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Showing content with the highest reputation on 10/17/17 in all areas

  1. FIXED!!! Took apart again tonight, with the help of someone on this forum, and his blowing skills, that are far more superior to mine, a tiny bit of s**t was cleared from the pilot housing. Put back together and wowee we have a boiler. Didn't need a new thermocouple. Hey ho! Thanks for all the comments and suggestions, as usual all welcome.
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  4. I have 5 110 A flooded batteries, when battery watch says they are fully charged, just came out of marina after fortnight on land line, charger and solar 4 100 solar panels all fully charged batteries, within few hours batteries down to around 45% always had this prob. doesn't matter how much i charge batteries lose charge, only running fridge freezer at night, turning this off makes little difference, had boat one year and always been much the same, would you say batteries done change them or any other advice, boat had been lying for a few months when we bought it.
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  5. Sorry, taking the Michael out of the added E on Bridgwater .
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  6. Thats a hell of a lot of information you are looking for there
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  7. Which rather suggests this all a bit of a storm in tea cup. As I suggested above, there would appear to be any actual serious consequences for a boat getting 'nipped" between the gates? It might appear to be alarming if it looks like your boat might be, but is it a real danger?
    1 point
  8. If the flood lock at Sawley is in action I'd think again. Only because if the river is rising you might end up punching the narrows on the bend below Cranfleet Lock on your return, also when it rises they put the gates on at the top of Cranfleet under the railway bridge. Which leaves you with an enjoyable, long trek to recover your car. Sadly the weather in the Derby area is not always an indicator of what the river will be doing. Since the flood alleviation work was completed umpty years ago everyone in your area learnt that "alleviate" doesn't mean it reduces or makes it easier. It means hurry it down line, get it out of your area and let those further along the river deal with it. Consequently someone peeing into The Trent from behind a bush in Burton or a geezer washing his car on his drive up near Matlock seems to result in a sunny day rip tide at Sawley followed the next day by a Tsunami in Newark. Curiously the next day while the inhabitants of Cleethorpes are stacking sand bags against their front doors the EA will have announced a hosepipe ban spanning the area between Stoke on Trent and Leeds. That's how unpredictable it can be. I once poddled down from Shardlow to charge my batteries. The intention was to have a quick lunchtime pint at The Steamboat and be back in time for early doors at The Malt Shovel that evening. However in the meantime some irresponsible person watered his garden in Staffordshire and I became a temporary resident on The Erewash for over a week. So just check Sawley flood lock and if both gates are pinned back you'll be fine.
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  11. Also remember if you passed your driving test after 1st Jan 1997 then your licence does not allow you to drive a vehicle and trailer greater than 3500 kgs or a trailer exceeding 750 kgs unless you pass an additional test. Before that date you have grandfather rights which enables you to tow over the above weights ( up to 7500 kgs)
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  12. All underwear can be worn four times to save water. Normal, front-to-back then inside out and back to front once more. One more day commando.
    1 point
  13. Indeed, flatten the lower bit and it looks like a tunnel view. Flatten it, sit on it, twist it and straighten it out again......it a training run for Braunston
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  15. Tunnel vision can be practised at home by looking at the sky through a toilet roll tube for an hour or so.
    1 point
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  17. We stock them. see here here
    1 point
  18. On my sailaway (Colecraft 60ft with Beta 43, which is beauty boatyfied) I enjoyed: getting the windows finally in. It stopped the snow coming in. Involved drilling and tapping about 175 holes. Never again, I'd go for clip types. getting it sprayfoamed. At last it could be heated. getting the floor down. I no longer tripped over the ballast bricks. getting the water tanks in. I no longer used 5L bottles. getting the flush toilet in. I no longer had to use an insane portapotti and empty its stinking contents down a filth hole. getting the 1000 x 760 shower in. Sheer luxury! getting the fixed bed working. 2000 x 1400mm. Big enough to get lost in. getting the standard 60cm cooker, gas fridge, standard washing machine, and tumble dryer in. Sheer joy. getting the large dinette working. lately, fitting a cot shelf for a 18month old visiting granddaughter so that she could go to bed before the adults. I could have bought a ready-made but I'd have been bored with it within 2 years.
    1 point
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  21. I'll bet there are scores of boat owners on here who at some time have thought about fitting out a sailaway. But read the above comments from those who have done it and dismiss the thought. The problem is there are now a lot of shell builders producing sailaways that on the face of it look like cracking value for money, and that's the appeal. One builder I was talking to recently said there was a time when he couldn't build them fast enough. But I do believe there are now so many examples of half finished boats covered in rusty primer that the message has got through - it is not a cheap way to buy a narrowboat. The builder I was talking to says he has definitely experienced a definite fall off in demand for sailaways in the last 18 months by the way.
    1 point
  22. I have done a few boats and you need to have electricity on site, live within 20 miles of where the boat is and commit pretty much every spare hour to sourcing stuff, e bay, timber yards, boat jumbles, planning, designing, a car with a roof rack at the very least, a cheap welder and a bit of skill with it and not forgetting actually building it without making big mistakes. People always say things like 'You must be so proud of what you've done, Well, a little bit I suppose but mostly relief that its done, relief that my wife hasn't wandered off after never seeing me for two years and relief that there is some money left. So, unless you really want to build a boat I would look for a nice, straightforward boat to buy that someone else has sweated over. Having said all that I have been making little drawings of a wooden tug on bits of paper all over the house. I just can't seem to stop. I reckon I might still have another boat left in me. Oh dear.
    1 point
  23. If you want a boat, buy a boat. If you want a boat building project, buy a sailaway How much time do you have to commit to this? Richard
    1 point
  24. well slightly. If London is concerned about fuel pollution then having perused the post "Diesel Quality" then maybe what is being supplied should be looked at . Coal only smokeless should be available Wood only dry aged should be used Diesel proper grade for engines should be available and spec labelled.
    1 point
  25. If anyone called Mike actually lived on board instead of merely sleeping there at night then he’d probably have a little more luck
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  26. Beta JD 3 ,good Engine.MtB had one but it was Far too reliable so he sold it!
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  27. Rather like my answer to the question "what is England's longest tunnel" I replied "The London Underground" Phil
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  28. I just went to bed singing this song Nobody likes meEverybody hates meI think I'll go eat worms!Big fat juicy onesEensie weensy squeensy onesSee how they wiggle and squirm!Down goes the first onedown goes the second oneOh how they wiggle and squirm!Up comes the first oneup comes the second oneOh how they wiggle and squirm! I bite off the headsand suck out the juice,And throw the skins away!Nobody knows how fat I grow,On worms three times a day!Nobody likes meeverybody hates meI think I'll go eat worms!Big fat juicy ones Eensie weensy squeensy ones,See how they wiggle and squirm! :):)
    1 point
  29. Holy grail?? Why on earth would you want a vintage engine without the engine room that goes with it? Is this your first boat by any chance...?
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  30. Don't have gas in the house, but I certainly turn the water off after having a filter burst and flood the living room. I turn everything off on the boat, ticking off a list because I don't want to be away for a week wondering if I've left the gas on or a light to flatten the battery. Can't send a postcard 'cos I've only got counterfeit stamps.
    1 point
  31. Absolutely do not fit those wheels Dave. Terrible idea. Personally I love tunnels. Just calculated I have transited over 50 miles and spent over 16 hours in tunnels in the past two years. Not a scratch on the handrails. Judging by the quality of that photo in the first post what the OP actually needs is something to steady his hand on the tiller. 14 pints of lager is a medically proven remedy. JP
    1 point
  32. You’re obviously having a great conversation with yourself here Wayne, and I hate to interrupt... but to answer the question about the hairy bits, when rollered most of them lay down flat. You can then lightly sand the surface to remove any that haven’t and give it another coat. Have fun with your samples and feel free to continue your chat
    1 point
  33. I was the person the BBC contacted and asked to talk about the "boat graveyard" at Harefield. I took the view that all publicity is good publicity, and it was great that the Beeb felt there was an appetite for a canal history programme. Prime time on the BBC is a great spot for viewer numbers but its not the time when an in depth programme would get aired. The coverage by Gogglebox was probably the level Sat Night TV is aimed at http://www.channel4.com/programmes/gogglebox/on-demand/.... The BBC team doing the research and recording were genuinely really interested in the site and whole local story - from the first "Bricks by Boat"chapter (as featured in the latest Narrowboat mag), to the final chapter and the boats sinking in the Colne Valley gravel pits. I was supposed to be advising the crew behind the camera, so rocked up unshaven and in scruffy togs. I ended up being interviewed by Mary Ann Ochota in front of the camera, so all a bit impromptu... Having to say the same thing over and over as they filmed from different angles wasn't the easiest thing for my brain to cope with! Anyway, the main thing from my perspective is that the Harefield filming "made the cut", and so got some great airtime. The BBC were genuinely interested in the site and the story, and I spent a nice amount of time with Mary Ann, showing her other boat remnants off camera too. So, we have gained some good allies and the possibility of expanding on the story in the future.
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  34. The paint probably came away as the can if new hadn't been degreased. An awful lot of cans have been painted without primer and somehow I find it hard to hear the likes of Jess Owen shouting "Joe get us a tin of self primer" when your at t bookies". as he sat grinding up te ingredients for the latest "Sam Barlows green".!!!
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  35. You would never get upto any sort of speed in London, I believe the average speed is only 7mph and having lived in London for the first 40 years of my life I am in agreement. Phil. Happy birthday
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  36. I am very happy with both the disadvantages and advantages of my outboard, We live aboard for a month at a time during the summer months and have no problems with getting fuel or electricity, and we do not have to run our engine for hours when we are stationary. It's just a different way of doing it
    1 point
  37. Yes, but I have a very bad habit of replying to posts as I read them and not reading all the thread before replying,If I do I forget what I was going to reply to.
    1 point
  38. I don't quite see it it that way. All the OP has sought according to his postings, has been clarification of what the legal position truly is, and has objected fiercely to the public relying on mere say-so from the authority. Admittedly, in the absence of clear direction from their legal department, he has been somewhat precipitate and disproportionate in his visceral response to their obfuscation, but it takes people with passion for justice and with conviction to force things into the open - and whether the result is what one might have desired or not, it is desirable to achieve a result. Nearly 2 and a half centuries of applicable legislation containing several different private company Acts as well as relevant public Acts to sort through, and their own lawyers cannot come up with a straightforward answer to a simple yet cogent question as to why they do what they do? It brings to mind the comment by Hildyard J regarding the 'morass' of BW legislation - it cannot be right that the public should have to rely on BW's say-so as to what they are entitled to do. Same applies here.
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  39. It's hardly a new idea! From this link.
    1 point
  40. I can't see it being a problem. First bump will bend the cabin, next will tear the wheel off Richard
    1 point
  41. Well I ought not to have spent the time, but herewith my own hasty synopsis of the relevant Acts affecting PRN & pleasure boat charges on the Bridgewater Canal. Question marks denote legislation I do not have copies of. 1759 Bridgewater Canal Act s.29 - 2 interpretations possible respecting PRN: no mention of pleasure boats, but ambiguity could potentially support use of any boat at all. 1760 Bridgewater Canal Act ? 1762 Bridgewater Canal Act ? 1766 Bridgewater Canal Act Riparian owner/occupiers to have free use of pleasure boats without charge, so long as no lock passage without consent. Note: if riparians granted free use of pleasure boats, implication is that others have not been; but see erivers post re GJCC Act 1793 [& my response] 1794 Bridgewater Canal Act s.73 Riparian boats may pass locks if either: a) consent of company, or b ) pay tonnage equal to 6 tons. Note: combining this section with previous, would suggest that ‘consent’ in 1766 was an ex-gratia one, and that henceforward an alternative to such consent was payment of a fixed charge. It might seem from this that even if consent for something was needed from the company, they were free to give or refuse that consent, but not on the basis of charging for that consent – perhaps. 1795 Bridgewater Canal Act ? 1847 Harbour Clauses Act ? 1870 Bridgewater Rules - nothing relevant 1885 Manchester Shipping Canal Act Interpretation: “vessels” includes “craft of every class & description however propelled.” s.62 provides that any riparian owner/occupier may construct wharves, landing places, side basins and lay-byes with suitable access to the canal, free of wharfage rates. s.128 provides that the company may demand dues in respect of every vessel specified in 3rd schedule to the Act on entering or leaving the canal [relating only to commercial craft]. s.129 provides for charges for carriage of both passengers & cargo s.130 provides that “light or empty vessels shall be at liberty to pass one way between the extreme points before mentioned or any intermediate places toll free.” s.138 provides that charges may be made for any vessel using the ‘communications’ to be built at Barton, unless repairs interrupt passage. s.139 provides that use of the canal for conveying fertiliser for field within a mile of the canal is free. s.149 provides that the company may licence lighters s.196/7 provide that the company may licence steam powered tugs for towing s.196 added byelaw powers – for regulating use of wharves, landing places, quays, basins and lay byes, but not private ones; for regulating speed limits of steam-powered vessels of all sorts; for regulating the T&C’s and charges for the grant of any licences as aforementioned; s.213 provides that unless expressly provided in this 1885 Act, nothing is to extend to prejudicially affect the provisions of the Bridgewater & etc Canal Acts Note: there are 2 classes of commercial vessel that they get power to licence here [which is later extended to other classes] but not including pleasure boats. 1886 MSC Act 1887 MSC Act 1888 MSC (additional lands) Act 1888 MSC (alteration of works) Act 1888 Railway and Canal Traffic Act - qualifies MSC under Transport Act 1962 s.52. 1890 MSC (tidal openings & etc) Act 1890 MSC Act - s.19 extension of Byelaw powers – nothing relevant 1891 MSC Act - nothing relevant 1893 MSC Act - nothing relevant 1893 Manchester Corporation (ship canal) Act - nothing relevant 1893 MSC (additional capital) Act - nothing relevant 1893 MSC (surplus lands) Act - nothing relevant 1894 MSC Act - nothing relevant 1894 Canal Rates Bridgewater & etc Act General Schedule applicable to all listed canals s.7(viii) expressly excludes charges for the boat occupation of any private wharf on the canal, in any private lay-by or in any private canal basin. Also provides for free overnight mooring at any Company berth, and for any reasonable time when not at work [providing no impediment to navigation or the facility]. Amended later in 1960. s.25 provides that “nothing in this schedule shall apply to pleasure boats or affect the tolls or charges (if any) which the Company are authorised to make in respect of such boats under the provisions of any Act of Parliament”. Note: the company were authorised by the 1794 Act to charge for pleasure boats to pass through a lock Special section Applicable Only to the Bridgewater Canals s.(i) provides that any empty boat passing through one or more locks, or entering the canal from another navigation, may be charged 5 shillings [unless on a return passage having paid toll on cargo carried Note 1: on its own, this could be interpreted as applying to any pleasure boat - which will fit the definition of an empty boat so far as carriage of cargo is concerned. The query would arise: does the special section come under the s.25 exemption of the general section? It seems to me that it must, but it is possibly arguable, demanding more attention. IF it could be said to apply to pleasure boats, then a charge for entering or leaving the canal from or to an adjoining navigation is authorised. It would not affect the freedoms of riparian boats, so long as they remained at private berths, and when leaving those to navigate did not either use a lock or leave the canal. Note 2: – on reading the 1960 Act, it is apparent that the special section did not include pleasure boats, hence the remedy of the additional clause; it DOES now include them. 1896 MSC Act - extension of byelaw powers for Bridgewater – nothing relevant 1897 MSC Act - nothing relevant 1900 MSC Act - nothing relevant 1904 (finances) Act - nothing relevant 1907 (various powers) Act - nothing relevant 1907 MSC (Bridgewater) Act – nothing relevant 1911 MSC Act - nothing relevant 1912 MSC Act - nothing relevant 1913 MSC Act - nothing relevant 1919 MSC Act - nothing relevant 1920 MSC Act - increase of Bridgewater rates; nothing relevant 1924 MSC Act - nothing relevant 1925 MSC Act - nothing relevant 1926 MSC (general powers) Act - nothing relevant 1926 MSC (staff superannuation) Act - nothing relevant 1928 MSC Act - nothing relevant 1933 MSC Act - nothing relevant 1936 MSC Act - s.32 removal of sunk stranded or abandoned vessels – not relevant 1945 MSC Act - nothing relevant 1947 Transport Act - nothing relevant 1949 MSC Act - nothing relevant 1950 MSC Act s.18 increased Bridgewater rates; s.25 abandonment of Bridgewater lock; undertakings re: other locks [repealed 1975] 1952 MSC Act - increased Bridgewater rates - no longer relevant 1954 Transport Charges &etc (miscellaneous provisions) Act – applied national charges schemes to private undertakings – nothing relevant – abolished in 1962 1956 MSC Act - ? 1960 MSC Act s.3 - application of Harbour Clauses Act 1847 – not relevant s.4 – additional canal tolls s.6 – company can charge any boat at all that remains in Runcorn Dock, and for use & occupation of any berth in Runcorn Docks s.6( b ) – extends definition of vessel in special section of the 1894 Rates Act applicable to Bridgewater, to embrace every type of craft, however propelled [hence pleasure boats]. Hence the entry & exit toll now applied to pleasure boats. s.9 – powers of removal of Bridgewater boats left therein without consent Note: consent not required for boats at private property/moorings, but is required for longer than overnight on company premises &/or towpath, for lock passage if not paid for, & for entering and exiting the canal. Schedule 3 – articles to be carried by pleasure craft in the harbour 1962 MSC Act - nothing relevant 1962 Transport Act - applies s.43(1)( b ) (2) (3) (5) & (6) to the charges of the Bridgewater 1966 MSC Act - nothing relevant 1970 MSC Revision Order - extension of byelaw powers 1975 MSC Revision Order - nothing relevant 1976 MSC (black bear canal) Act - abolished PRN, but nothing relevant to Bridgewater Note: I have not seen the original Act for the waterway affected; if couched in the same terms as the Bridgewater, might affect the interpretation of PRN there. 1983 MSC Revision Order - nothing relevant 1984 MSC Revision Order - nothing relevant 1987 MSC Revision Order - nothing relevant 1990 MSC Revision Order - nothing relevant 1992 MSC Revision Order - nothing relevant 2012 Bridgewater Canal (Transfer of Undertakings) Order s.4 - affirms existing byelaws, extends byelaw making powers to include registration, T&C’s etc, subject to a penalty not exceeding level 3 on the standard scale. s.7 – affirms power to make reasonable charges, though that subject - s.7( c ) - to any prior enactment which “expressly or impliedly provides for freedom from charges or otherwise prohibits the making of any charge.” Note: that last respecting “reasonable” is odd, given the TA 1962 which had specifically removed the need for reasonableness in charges – maybe government were having a change of heart? Apart from the missing Acts, there will be sections bearing on consent for berthing at private premises which I have skimmed over and which I don’t feel like going back to look for at the moment. So far as PRN is concerned, it is now irrelevant, given Parliamentary sanction for transit charges to be levied has been discovered.
    1 point
  42. no need, you will never get creases with this method, in fact you will never need to worry about emptying it, or ironing again. And you can run it from a cheap Chinese invertor, outdoors of course for when both set on fire.
    1 point
  43. What a joy to wake up to all these helpful, kind, funny and practical answers. To summarize so far (in no particular order) 1. Slow down, especially when passing moored boats. Slow down to enjoy the canal. Slow down (this is my goal for the trip) 2. Read the Nicholson guide (downloaded and read it last night) 3. Don't waste the water in the locks by emptying without a boat in it, unless there is no-one in sight 4. Don't moor in places where others need to go - such as water stops, winding holes 5. Take turns at bridges and tunnels (notify waiting boats if you have a boat immediately following) 6. Be prepared for some humiliation on keeping the boat going straight (I've read the zigzag thread) 7. Do the homework - watch the canal trust videos https://canalrivertrust.org.uk/enjoy-the-waterways/boating/a-guide-to-boating/boaters-handbook (done) 8. Learn how to use and protect the locks - paddles etc. 9. "Drive" on the right 10. Pay Mike the Boilerman 10 Pounds per lock + 20% VAT and hope that he buys everyone some warm beer when he gets back from the Seychelles Thanks again - can't wait to get out there in June 2018. We'll warn you before we get going
    1 point
  44. If it’s something like a Pressure Jet it will use electric, something like a large fridge. The old drip fed ones used no electric but weren’t automatic.
    1 point
  45. So why say it then if it's not relevant? It's the automatic use of such language that shows your intrinsic racism. Actually, it may be time for you to stop digging - why is colour so important to you (I detect a pathology here)... and why a tenant? Are homeowners just a better class of people and so unlikely to be nasty to you? Racist, classist... unable to argue without abuse... no wonder Peel don't bother with you - it's got nothing to do with the legalities, they just don't think you matter much. And nor do I.
    1 point
  46. Fancy new Kabola or fancy old Kabola. New may mean power hungry, old means inefficient!
    1 point
  47. Always best to have two independent sources of heat, hot water and electricity to charge batteries on a boat. Stove & Kabola; engine & Kabola; 2 alternators. It's called "redundancy and minimises your pain when one inevitably fails. Ideally the boat would have two engines, but that's not practicable on a canal boat.
    1 point
  48. I agree that unless they are very old, the boards will have been planed by machine, but that does not mean they cannot be planed manually. A Jack plane, or Jointer, can leave tramlines, but if a smoothing plane is sharpened correctly ie:- slightly convex, it will not leave tramlines, and will not leave a mess as you suggest. At one time (in the past) the boards would have been given a final overplaning with a toothing plane and then palm sanded to remove any planing marks, but that stage is rarely undertaken these days, except in the most traditional workshops. You may have gathered that I still do all my woodworking by hand using traditional tools and, having been taught by a Cabinet Maker, can use and maintain them correctly. With the demise of almost all paractical training in schools theses days, the traditional skills will, sadly, be all but lost in another couple of generations
    1 point
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