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Bee

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Bee last won the day on September 12

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Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Ironbridge

Previous Fields

  • Occupation
    retired
  • Boat Name
    Bee
  • Boat Location
    France

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  1. Last time I was asked what the money was for I was in the bank drawing out £750 or so. Said it was to pay for a quantity of dope. Oh how we laughed! Then I told them a really big lie - said it was to pay for a second hand car. Hee hee!, They believed the lie! (please don't dob me in to Priti Patel anybody, I might just have embroidered the story a little)
  2. Funny thing airflow. Used to live in a small terraced house, the roofspace had been boarded out and was a tiny bedroom, there was a Velux window in the roof and if you opened it the rest of the house immediately smelt of soot. The normal airflow was reversed, the airflow out of the velux overcame the usual flow up the chimney and the chimney pulled sooty air into the house. If you had tried to light the fire it would have smoked like hell and if the fire was glowing nicely it would have filled the house with nasty gas. I recommend using the draw up the chimney to pull low lying cold damp air out of the boat to provide combustion air.
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  7. A boat is chock full of systems, frequently everything that a house has but smaller, more inaccessible, of rare and unusual design and on my boat no professional has had a hand in putting it all together. It also runs on 12 volt with a bit of 240 here and there , the heating is unusual - paraffin - and the engine is nearer the front than the back. Crammed into most boats is an ex automotive or plant engine and coupled to the propeller by a frequently poorly installed gearbox and various couplings. All this is contained in a hull that is impossible to inspect on the inside and not easy to interpret on the outside. Also in this challenging structure is enough gas to destroy a medium sized house, enough amps to melt big chunks of metal and enough diesel to make a very hot thing even hotter. Pity the poor old surveyor who inspects this expensive assemblage and misses a corroded jubilee clip or missing split pin that sinks the whole lot. As MrsM says, check as much as you can and it really is in our own interest to familiarise ourselves with our boats. There, That'll put everybody off buying a boat and make a bit more space on the cut.
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  10. Well its a better project than many, better project than the old wooden joey boat I started on , A couple of weeks really hard work would make a really big difference, its got stern gear, prop, gearbox (engines probably not worth the bother) and as for that big dent in the stern just fit a ladder in it and say its deliberate for reboarding if you fall in.
  11. Seen it done but towing a bucket from the stern. The Riqueval Tunnel in France, An electric tug (overhead wires so don't thrash around with a hookshaft) hauls a train of boats through with engines off, we were tied behind a Belgian boat and behind us were other boats so the Belgian boat must have had 50 tons on its bollards . As soon as we entered the tunnel he flung the bucket off the back on a rope presumably to keep it going straight. Can't imagine it made a lot of difference somehow. As for dragging a chain along from the front I've never done it but I must try it sometime as Bee goes backwards like an omelette in a pan.
  12. You're right, Its the final bit of prep before painting that a quick (!) flick over with the sander that I'm really thinking of and also, a slightly different situation, epoxy paint is hard stuff, I,ve never used a wire disc on mine but a wire brush seems to polish it. Hard to tell really, Paint gets tested in laboratories then used by some lazy so and so in a cold wet dock.
  13. Other people might think that's a silly idea but I think its a really good plan, after all GRP boats (with various chemistry) use that sot of stuff to keep the thing afloat.
  14. I haven't got a handy electron microscope to see what the surface of steel looks like after attacking it with wire wheels but a wire brush can make a surface shiny and a sanding disk can make it matt so I think I will carry on with a big heap of sanding discs to key the steel after more aggressive treatment to shift rust, scale and old paint, Sanding discs clog too quickly for the initial treatment and if there are traces of bitumen they can melt the old covering and make a right mess.
  15. !0 m3 of air to burn I litre of oil? Hmmm, that's quite a lot but our little paraffin heater (loosely based on the incredibly expensive Taylors heater, £1500 ish !!!!!) will run for ages on a cupful. Works very nicely and is flued to the outside. draws air from the cabin though. I reckon it uses about two Tesco carrier bags of air an hour.
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