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Alan de Enfield

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Alan de Enfield last won the day on October 17

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  1. As previously noted I have had 2800 litres of fuel in my tanks for the last 5 years (due to family problems), Having eventually 'got some cruising in this Summer' with no starting, running, or fuel problems I remain in the "keep your tanks full" camp. From the link : I guess what I'm saying is that it doesn't really matter as you can't effectively stop the water from getting into the tank. If you keep the tank level low, you'll get more condensation from the air due to a greater area of cold, exposed tank wall but the water dissolved in the relatively small amount of fuel won't be as big a contributor to the problem. If you keep the tank level high, you'll get more water out of the fuel when the temp drops but you won't have as much exposed tank wall to condense water out of the air. If I had to pick one, I'd probably keep the tank full to minimize the tank wall area that'd allow condensation from the air every time the dew point drops below the tank temperature. Over the course of months, this could happen quite a number of times. Theoretically, even a full tank of diesel could draw water from the air directly into the fuel but in practice I doubt that the fuel can equilibrate with the moisture in the air very quickly via a vent line so the majority of the water in the tank would come from the initial fuel fill. As always, the otherside of the argument using 'sound logic' will be expounded so we are no nearer a conclusion. Cassette or pump-out ?
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  3. But the fuel boat will deliver, unload and stack your 20kg bags of smokeless - do you want him delivering 20kg containers of 'poop' for you ?
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  5. On a previous NB the owner had 'plumbed in' a schraeder valve into the cauliflower, putting a bike pump onto it (and pumping) built up the pressure and forced the water out. The only other way I have been successful (blowing back up the hot water on the shower doesn't seem to empty the cauliflower) is to 'break the circuit' by removing one of the pipes, allowing air in and water out. With me leaving the engine room heaters on I do not bother draining the cauliflower (it is in the engine room), if it wasn't, I would.
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  8. No, it needs phyically removing as the water will not run out unless some runs in (a vacuum) Out of the taps and down the plug hole.
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  13. No its not a full drain down - it only takes a couple of continuous days of zero degrees for the small amounts of water 'above canal water level' to freeze and 'pop joints'. It takes no more that 5 minutes to 'drain down' and when you return to the boat you simply close the taps and switch the pump back on (1 minute job ?) I now have 6 foot long greenhouse heaters running down each side of the engine room which I have on timers so the come on 3 x a day for about 4 hours each time (Evening, middle of the night/early into the morning and again mid day) this keeps all the pipework, calorifier filter, engines etc from freezing and costs roughtly £1 per day in 'leccy. Obvioulsy only practical if you are on a shore-line. I'm planning on trying a 2kw oil filled radiator this year switched by a 'frost' thermostat, as the problem with the 'timers' is that they come on even if the temperature is 'in the teens'.
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