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Alan de Enfield

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Alan de Enfield last won the day on November 18

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  1. Fishing at visitor moorings At some visitor mooring sites, you will find signage that restricts angling activity. Naturally, the wording of official signage should be adhered to, not least because it could be a byelaw offence to ignore the instructions on Trust signage. In the absence of signage, the use of the towpath is on a first-come-first -served basis. Angling club agreements state ‘Licensees or permitted users should not actively obstruct or impede the mooring of craft at locations signed by the Trust as being for the purpose of mooring but for the avoidance of doubt nothing in this clause is intended to prevent fishing from signed mooring locations when there is no craft present at the mooring and there is no craft wishing to use a mooring.’ That being the case, then there would be no need for the "first come first served" statement. If you are correct : 1) A Fisherman arrives 1st, starts fishing and a boat comes, he must pack up as the boat mooring has priority. 2) A Boat is located where the Fisherman wishes to 'drown his worm' but it is a mooring so the boat has priority. And, yet, nowhere in the T&Cs, or guidance to boaters, or guidance to fisherfolk does it say that boats have priority - we may feel it should say that but that does not alter the facts that it doesn't state that.
  2. It is contradictory. A boater would say that, but a Fisherman would say it says "First come first served" Fishing at visitor moorings At some visitor mooring sites, you will find signage that restricts angling activity. Naturally, the wording of official signage should be adhered to, not least because it could be a byelaw offence to ignore the instructions on Trust signage. In the absence of signage, the use of the towpath is on a first-come-first -served basis. Angling club agreements state ‘Licensees or permitted users should not actively obstruct or impede the mooring of craft at locations signed by the Trust as being for the purpose of mooring but for the avoidance of doubt nothing in this clause is intended to prevent fishing from signed mooring locations when there is no craft present at the mooring and there is no craft wishing to use a mooring.’
  3. I posted this in Post No 18 (taken from C&RT's website Fishing at visitor moorings At some visitor mooring sites, you will find signage that restricts angling activity. Naturally, the wording of official signage should be adhered to, not least because it could be a byelaw offence to ignore the instructions on Trust signage. In the absence of signage, the use of the towpath is on a first-come-first -served basis. Angling club agreements state ‘Licensees or permitted users should not actively obstruct or impede the mooring of craft at locations signed by the Trust as being for the purpose of mooring but for the avoidance of doubt nothing in this clause is intended to prevent fishing from signed mooring locations when there is no craft present at the mooring and there is no craft wishing to use a mooring.’
  4. Correct - if he bought it from a private seller, or a broker (who did not own the boat) then he has no come back on anyone else but himself. UNLESS , he got in writing (or can prove otherwise) that the seller stated there were 'no problems' with the boat and specifically stated that there were no problems with the things the OP has identified. I doubt anyone would say "there is no problem with the mastic around the sink" etc etc. Second hand boats really are caveat Emptor !! I'm guessing that the OP did not employ a surveyor as it sounds as all of these 'problems' are glaringly obvious to anyone with any boat knowledge
  5. For those who have difficulty with links : While many of you will have been dreaming of a white Christmas, our Water Management team always look forward to a rainy Christmas, or at least one with prolonged, hydrologically effective rainfall in the right places to help refill our reservoirs for the next boating season!
  6. I have a pair of PRM 500s on my Ford engines. Not clunky or noisy. Maybe there is a fault ?
  7. You'd best ask C&RT, they write this stuff where every paragraph conflicts with another.
  8. It is still 'live' on their website. (I cut & pasted the above from there.) https://canalrivertrust.org.uk/enjoy-the-waterways/fishing/related-articles/the-fisheries-and-angling-team/sharing-the-space-tips-for-anglers
  9. It wouldn't surprise me, following on from C&RTs instructions (a couple of years ago) to leave 5 metres between moored boats to allow spaces for fishermen. Fishing at visitor moorings At some visitor mooring sites, you will find signage that restricts angling activity. Naturally, the wording of official signage should be adhered to, not least because it could be a byelaw offence to ignore the instructions on Trust signage. In the absence of signage, the use of the towpath is on a first-come-first -served basis. Angling club agreements state ‘Licensees or permitted users should not actively obstruct or impede the mooring of craft at locations signed by the Trust as being for the purpose of mooring but for the avoidance of doubt nothing in this clause is intended to prevent fishing from signed mooring locations when there is no craft present at the mooring and there is no craft wishing to use a mooring.’ Winter moorings The needs of angling customers are incorporated into the terms and conditions of the issue of these permits. A five-metre gap must be kept between one boat and the next for the purposes of permitting angling from the towpath. We are exploring whether this ought to apply more generally between moored boats. Do take special care when fishing within close proximity of boats. It would not be acceptable to lean your equipment up against the boat hull, for example. Fishing where you find moorings rings Unless so signed to the contrary, anglers are permitted to fish where there are towpath mooring rings present, in a similar way to boaters having the right to moor where there are angling club permanent peg numbers. Mooring rings might be present underneath powerlines or within 25 metres of a lock wall approach. Clearly, fishing would not be permitted in these locations.
  10. I used a standard domestic Mira shower unit. Works fine with 'standard' boat water pumps.
  11. That won't do much good, it was repealed in 2015. It was replaced by the Consumer Goods Act which if read will show that he has absolutely no come back. Under the Consumer Rights Act you have a legal right to reject goods that are of unsatisfactory quality, unfit for purpose or not as described, and get a full refund - as long as you do this quickly. This right is limited to 30 days from the date you take ownership of your product. After 30 days, you will not be legally entitled to a full refund if your item develops a fault, although some sellers may offer you an extended refund period. Second hand goods : When you buy from an individual (as opposed to a retailer), the Consumer Rights Act says that the goods you get must be as they were described to you by the seller. There's no obligation on the seller to disclose any faults, but misrepresenting goods isn't allowed.
  12. The OP did say that he bought it a 1 year old and with 35 hours 'on the clock' so unless the manufacturer had taken it back on a P/X or warranty claim it was not likely to be under any warranty.
  13. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  14. Presumably as it was second hand when you bought it, it was not purchased directly from Aintree. If it was purchased from a 'broker' who was representing / selling on behalf of an 'individual' and it was not sold as part of a business then you have no warranty. If it was owned by the broker selling it then you would be legally covered as long as you could prove 'it was not fit for purpose'. You have absolutely no come-back on Aintree and they were (legally) correct to tell you to 'go away'. This is why many people advise that you have a surveyor 'go-over' your potential purchase so you have someone to blame (rather than yourself) when the problems are not identified.
  15. I've got a workshop manual if you need a copy. Hang-Out (over the side)
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