Jump to content

Alan de Enfield

Member
  • Posts

    33807
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    122

Alan de Enfield last won the day on July 17 2021

Alan de Enfield had the most liked content!

About Alan de Enfield

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Y felinheli

Previous Fields

  • Occupation
    Porn Star
  • Boat Name
    Bezimeni & Sea Wolf

Recent Profile Visitors

29394 profile views

Alan de Enfield's Achievements

9.4k

Reputation

1

Community Answers

  1. It is quite acceptable to use the 'old' 5a round-pin plugs / sockets for your Dc circuits and use '13 amp' plugs and sockets for your AC circuit. AS LONG AS the plugs / sockets are not interconnectable.
  2. Whilst there are a hard core on here who will say "F**K the rules, who will know, who will care anyway, who will enforce it", there are wiring regulations for "Small Boats" both for AC and Dc wiring, here is what is says about plugs/sockets for DC wiring : 11 Receptacles/sockets 11.1 Receptacles/sockets and matching plugs used on d.c. systems shall not be interchangeable with those used on a.c. systems on the craft. 11.2 Receptacles/sockets installed in locations subject to rain, spray or splashing shall have a minimum protection of IP 55, in accordance with IEC 60529 when not in use, e.g. protected by a cover with an effective weatherproof seal. 11.3 Receptacles/sockets installed in areas subject to flooding or momentary submersion shall have a minimum protection of IP 67, in accordance with IEC 60529, including when in use with connecting plugs Whilst "you" may not care, I'm sure your insurers would be grateful for giving them good reason not to pay out ................... For the 'Alternating Current' (230v AC) requirements it says : 13 Receptacles/sockets 13.1 Receptacles/sockets and matching plugs used on a.c. systems shall not be interchangeable with those used in the d.c. system on the craft. 13.2 Receptacles/sockets installed in locations subject to rain, spray or splashing shall be able to be enclosed in IP 55 enclosures, in accordance with IEC 60529, as a minimum, when not in use. Receptacles mated with the appropriate plug shall also remain sealed, in accordance with IEC 60529. 13.3 Receptacles/sockets installed in areas subject to flooding or momentary submersion shall be in IP 56 enclosures, in accordance with IEC 60529, as a minimum, also meeting these requirements when in use with electrical plugs. 13.4 Receptacles/sockets shall be of the earthing type with a terminal provided for the protective conductor. 13.5 Receptacles/sockets provided for the galley area shall be located so that appliance cords may be plugged in without crossing above a galley stove or sink or across a traffic area. 13.6 Receptacles/sockets shall have a voltage rating in accordance with the voltage supplied by the power sources
  3. Yes. When you say you have 230v sockets, do you mean the 'normal' 3-pin (square pins) in a triangular shape aka "13 amp socket". If so that would be very very unusual and against all wiring regs. Before connecting up your 12v appliances it may be worth just checking that non of these '230v sockets' are indeed 230v, if they are you will release lots of magic smoke and many swear words. You can of course replace the magic smoke but it is not easy.
  4. And folks thing they are being green - talk about deluded !
  5. Ahhh - I see inches - Doh. I blame the man-flu and thae fact I've taken every rmedy kniown to manking in the last 24 hours I cannot stay awa....zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz
  6. That is certainly a problem when you 'get off the housing ladder' it is extremely difficult to get back on - particularly over the last couple of years whilst house prices have escalated at a phenominal rate (some 20%) . This is why it is often recommended that if you are not 100% sure about adapting to boating life, you rent out your house / flat and let the rent pay for the loan on your boat. You at least then always have your bricks and mortar to return to. Have you considered some of the local Council supported schemes, where you are as independant as you want to be, but one 'pull on the string' and a warden comes and sorts out any problems. Mother in Law had a lovely little 1 bedroom detached bungalow, on a small 'estate' of similar houses, with regular bus pick-ups and even a 'community hall' for party / bingo / old time music hall etc etc.
  7. Yes there are differences within part 2 and each application (house, caravan, motorhome, boat) must be applied for and tested individually.
  8. Or she may have done what she said she did and just brought a 6 month licence. Its not rocket science.
  9. Think about the gas safe engineers - they have to qualify separately to be able to work on LPG, and then separately again to work on domestic LPG, and separately again to work on caravan LPG and separately again to work on Boat LPG systems. The part 2 specification for the alarms is similar, there are certain criteria the manufacturer can choose to meet and in this case the manufacturer had decided that the market for boat CO alarms is so small he is unlikely to recoup the cost of submitting samples and paying for 'boat approval' - hence the boat symbol is X'd thru and the alarm is not approved for boat use. He has had the alarm tested to whatever the caravan tests require and it has passed.
  10. But you have land and composting heaps to 'do it properly' I wonder if the OP does ? I'd suggest that very few CCers can properly work a composting system purely on their boat.
  11. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  12. Are you sure about the composting toilet ? How will you handle the 'waste' ? Here is one of the numerous discussions on the subject :
  13. The video earlier in the thread shows a powder extinguisher being 'let-off' inside a boat galley, and the engine room.
×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.