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cuthound

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cuthound last won the day on April 22 2020

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About cuthound

  • Birthday 01/19/1954

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Staffordshire
  • Interests
    Boating on Britains canals
    Motor sport (especially Formula One)
    Listening to music

Previous Fields

  • Occupation
    Retired (critical power & cooling project mgt)
  • Boat Name
    Delta Queen
  • Boat Location
    Staffordshire

Recent Profile Visitors

10267 profile views
  1. Here is a photo of Oberon (ex-Ownerships) in private ownership . It was taken at Fradley in 2018. Sorry it is upside down, even when I invert the original it appear upside down here.
  2. But surely what the broker gives you initially is an estimate of value.
  3. Isn't that the process by which most people get a value to insure their boat, by buying one in the first place?
  4. So how do hundreds of boats sell each year? I assume it goes like this. 1. Boater takes boat to broker, who values it and advertises it. 2. Prospective buyer see it and maybe makes an offer, possiblly subject to survey. 3. If surveyed and problems found price renegotiated and remedial work undertaken. 4. Buyer sails away in his new boat. Many boats sell at point 2 without a survey.
  5. I dont know yet, I'll see what the insurance company requires. If they require a broker valuation, then I will call each broker and ask them how much they charge for one.
  6. Actually with increasing boat prices that isn't a bad idea, although insurers might be reluctant to offer it because of the difficulty in valuing burnt out boats.
  7. Thanks everyone. I will contact the insurance company (Towergate) on Monday and ask them what they require for me to increase the value. If they require a broker to value the boat, I am fortunate in having two close by. Hopefully they will allow me to increase the value by £10k without the need for a valuation.
  8. As A de E says use spring lines, although on narrowboats it is more usual to have two lines at each end, each going at 45° away from the dolly (so there is a 90° angle between the two lines), rather than connected at differing points along the hull. Finally, never use the centre line to moor. It will dramatically exaggerate movement when a boat goes past.
  9. Yes I know that. My concern is that with the recent increase in purchase price, driven by increased demand for secondhand boats, my current valuation will not allow me to purchase a similar boat, should I suffer a total loss.
  10. I paid £65k in 2014. There is one Kingsground boat of the same age for sale on the Duck at about £60, but it doesnt look as well specified as mine, or to be in such good condition. I will ask at one of the local boatyards for a valuation and then approach my current insurer.
  11. Not a liveaboard but have £1k cover for personal items on board, plus my house contents insurance covers mobile phone, computing and photographic equipment when outside of the house.
  12. Next month my insurance is due. Today I received my renewal notification, which is a couple of pounds less than I paid last year. The insured sum is the same as the amount that I paid for the boat when I bought it in 2014. I am aware that boat values have increased sharply over tne past year or two. Looking on Apollo Duck boats of a similar age and length to mine (60 foot 2007 build, Kingsground fitout on an Alexander hull in excellent condition, epoxy blacked over Zinger from new and reblacked and repainted in 2019) vary from about £50k to £80k.
  13. Damn, when DQ was dry docked for her survey the base plate was covered in mussels. I was rather hoping they were protecting the bade plate. I'll have to take regular trips up the Ashby to scrape them off.
  14. So if the baseplate is covered in mussels would they prevent corrosion, or would you still need to black it? 😁
  15. If they critiscied the boats, then the builder wouldn't offer them any more to test. Be honest, have you ever read a critical boat review in one of main boating magazines?
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