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bizzard

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bizzard last won the day on June 5 2020

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About bizzard

  • Birthday July 16

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  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    bishops stortford
  • Occupation
    retarded mechanic
  • Boat Name
    lady olga
  • Boat Location
    R.Stort.

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  1. The LH150 box is about 3'' longer than the LM100 box, including the 2.1 reduction unit on either, in case this matters.
  2. Which gearbox ? The manual Lister LM100 will have a long change lever sticking up with a large sweeping arc to change from forards backards. The Lister LH150 is a much better choice, a hydraulic assisted change which only needs a short lightweight dual control lever which works both gearchange and engine throttle in one, Whereas the manual LM100 box would need a separate throttle control as well as the big gear lever.
  3. If it's an early Springer it could well have a Lister air cooled engine and so no skin tank to bother about.
  4. Air trapped inside hollow objects like Mikes rudder has nothng whatsoever to do with it's or giving it more buoyancy. It is purely it's displacement size and weight that determins it's level of buoyancy. If it's air was sucked out and it was put into a vacuum inside it wouldn't make any difference either as long as it retained the same overall size and weight.
  5. No. Sprites were BMC Austin Healey Sprite sports cars, called Frog eyed because of their after thought headlights stuck on top of the bonnet. Healey Sprite.
  6. Or the FES, Frog Eye'd Sprites.
  7. It's very good, two part epoxy putty. Ok on the steel hull below the water line because the temperature there is kept more or less uniform. Viagra is really only good for preventing you from rolling out of bed.
  8. I see, because the rudder is hollow you wouldn't want to drill more holes through it. Perhaps drill through and bolt through on one hole as accurately as you can, assembly on the ground keepin drill and or reamer as square and upright as possible, and retain pinch bolt as security on the other.
  9. Yes but you need to keep it perfectly square on or the hole may end up oval. Wouldn't cost much to take rudder and stock and bolt to a machine shop, they would machine ream it accurately.
  10. Reamers arn't expensive. Just drilling and bolting through. there will be a slackish fit which will wear and cause on going slop. reaming accurately for an interferance fit this cannot happen. If you don't ream them retain the pinch bolts as well.
  11. Inspect the inside of the existing tube first and if it looks badly deeply pitted might be worth doing. It might or will get between but believe me the double thickness will outlast the rest of the boat and probably a life time. A circular rubber or silicone disc slipped down the stock will help to stop water spilling over.
  12. Common on Liverpool boata and others. If drilling right through rudder and stock, the bolt needs to have a long unthreaded shank and fit with precision. Drill the hole slightly undersize and then use a reamer to size it accurately for the bolt, Any slop and if the other pinch bolts let go then the bolt and hole will wear quickly.
  13. Incidentally. If your worried about the rudder stock tube you could also while the rudder and stock are out poke another length of tube up inside as far as it will go up the existing one and weld around it's bottom, of course the top of it can't be welded but it's good insurance all the same, and providing of course that there will be enough room, clearance for the stock to pass through it.
  14. But how do your old rudder and the new one compare. Are the trailng part and balance part of similar sizes dimentions.
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