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Historic Boats for sale online


alan_fincher

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13 minutes ago, sparrowcycles said:

Exactly. 

I'm no expert but I do have a keen interest in the pleasure boats of the mid 60s to mid 80s and this looks like a boat built by the West Riding boat company.. 

 

They have very distinctive stem posts

 

Yes I was thinking the stem post was a strange design, but one I've seen before. The comment about it being a shallow V hull made me wonder if it was some sort of Springer but the stem post rather ruled that out....

 

But it looks a very fine example of a leisure boat from that era!

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
6 minutes ago, matty40s said:

Ah, yes, a £40k project boat...

 

I note the advert specifies "no time wasters".

 

Always puzzles me when people put that in adverts, as it sort of implies they only want people to respond who are definitely going to buy it. Whereas my own style of buying a boat (or anything) is to want a good close look at it to assess a) whether I want to buy it at all and b ) if I want it, how much it is worth to me and what to offer. 

 

So I imagine this makes me a time waster in their eyes, and I find myself reluctant to respond to the ad in the first place.

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4 minutes ago, MtB said:

 

I note the advert specifies "no time wasters".

 

Always puzzles me when people put that in adverts, as it sort of implies they only want people to respond who are definitely going to buy it. Whereas my own style of buying a boat (or anything) is to want a good close look at it to assess a) whether I want to buy it at all and b ) if I want it, how much it is worth to me and what to offer. 

 

So I imagine this makes me a time waster in their eyes, and I find myself reluctant to respond to the ad in the first place.

Much depends on whose time, in the seller's opinion, is being wasted.

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5 minutes ago, Athy said:

Much depends on whose time, in the seller's opinion, is being wasted.

 

I have to agree, in this case the advertiser could be argued to be the one wasting people's time by asking £40k for an unconverted butty of little historic value, having had the back cut off and a counter stern stuck on by Malcolm Braine. 

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When I was selling Owl I had a good number of what you might call non-serious enquiries.  I got the impression that they simply wanted a good old nose around the boat but were not interesting in buying.  My solution was to refer them politely to my website which gave a detailed history of the boat and its restoration and invite them to ring me again when they had had a look.   They never got back to me.  This reduced the potential purchasers to three: one who couldn't raise the money; one who couldn't make up his mind and one who clearly loved the boat and bought it immediately.

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18 minutes ago, matty40s said:

Ah, yes, a £40k project boat...

I note no internal photographs are provided, but the advert states 'a blank canvas'.

 

There is a world of difference between a fully sorted hull and cabin where a weekend with some sandpaper and a paintbrush, plus a dry-docking and blacking, will give you something to fit out as you wish (essentially a sailaway with some historic interest) vs. a hull which is nearly perforated along the waterline and needs blast cleaning inside and out before extensive weld repairs, a cabin which needs ripping off and re-starting and an engine which needs rebuilding or replacing.

 

There is no way of knowing from that advert which of the above you are looking at, so somebody's time is going to get wasted in finding out.

 

Alec

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1 hour ago, agg221 said:

I note no internal photographs are provided, but the advert states 'a blank canvas'.

 

There is a world of difference between a fully sorted hull and cabin where a weekend with some sandpaper and a paintbrush, plus a dry-docking and blacking, will give you something to fit out as you wish (essentially a sailaway with some historic interest) vs. a hull which is nearly perforated along the waterline and needs blast cleaning inside and out before extensive weld repairs, a cabin which needs ripping off and re-starting and an engine which needs rebuilding or replacing.

 

There is no way of knowing from that advert which of the above you are looking at, so somebody's time is going to get wasted in finding out.

 

Alec

 

 

Yes, all this. Which kinda makes the "No time wasters" statement doubly ironic! 

 

 

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7 hours ago, koukouvagia said:

When I was selling Owl I had a good number of what you might call non-serious enquiries.  I got the impression that they simply wanted a good old nose around the boat but were not interesting in buying.  My solution was to refer them politely to my website which gave a detailed history of the boat and its restoration and invite them to ring me again when they had had a look.   They never got back to me.  This reduced the potential purchasers to three: one who couldn't raise the money; one who couldn't make up his mind and one who clearly loved the boat and bought it immediately.

Clever!

5 hours ago, MtB said:

 

 

Yes, all this. Which kinda makes the "No time wasters" statement doubly ironic! 

 

 

I think "no time wasters" puts off certain potential serious buyers too.

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If I saw 'no time wasters' in an ad, I would totally ignore it and go look anyway if I was interested. How would the seller know I was a time waster until I had wasted his time? And at that point if I decided I didn't want to go further with the purchase I wouldn't give a damn what the seller thought!

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  • 2 weeks later...
8 hours ago, James Owen said:

I wonder which 'conversion' they refer to, that from 1880's horse boat to butty or perhaps from butty to powered butty?

It might never have been a butty. 

 

I briefly owned an 1884 Bantock "type 1" motorised horse boat. It had been converted from being a horse drawn barge to a motor barge.

 

This boat is the one I had:

https://www.nationalhistoricships.org.uk/register/2087/orianne

Lovely old thing but I didn't want to ruin it by putting a steel cabin on it.

 

I think Rayleigh might be the same type and could have been motorised a long time ago.

 

 

 

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1 hour ago, magnetman said:

It might never have been a butty. 

 

I briefly owned an 1884 Bantock "type 1" motorised horse boat. It had been converted from being a horse drawn barge to a motor barge.

 

This boat is the one I had:

https://www.nationalhistoricships.org.uk/register/2087/orianne

Lovely old thing but I didn't want to ruin it by putting a steel cabin on it.

 

I think Rayleigh might be the same type and could have been motorised a long time ago.

 

 

 

Did’nt Jim Mcdonald end up with Oriagne and convert it. ( Eileen)

Lovely boat 

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35 minutes ago, roland elsdon said:

Did’nt Jim Mcdonald end up with Oriagne and convert it. ( Eileen)

Lovely boat 

Yes he had Eileen, I tried to buy it but he wouldn't sell it to me ☹️ 

Very fast and swam like a fish 😱

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I remember EILEEN at Chertsey. Chap named Paul lived aboard with his dog, a long haired collie called 'Toby'. Early eighties.

The boat had a full length cabin in wood, the engine was in the stern, ahead of which was a cabin in the traditional back cabin layout, but reversed with side hatches and access through to the front (from distant memory). Very atmospheric and very comfortable. I dare say it was pretty rotten too, hence the start of several changes. Much later she was with Jim at 'two bridges'.

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3 hours ago, magnetman said:

It might never have been a butty. 

 

I briefly owned an 1884 Bantock "type 1" motorised horse boat. It had been converted from being a horse drawn barge to a motor barge.

 

This boat is the one I had:

https://www.nationalhistoricships.org.uk/register/2087/orianne

Lovely old thing but I didn't want to ruin it by putting a steel cabin on it.

 

I think Rayleigh might be the same type and could have been motorised a long time ago.

 

 

 

I was being facetious. The advert reads 'converted butty'.

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