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Derek R.

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Everything posted by Derek R.

  1. And another tanker load of Windolene . . . It's a bit heavy on the 'Henley regatta' look.
  2. Terrifying. Nobody volunteers for submarines.
  3. There are dozens of books on waterways history, the engineers, the boats themselves and the 'folk art' that surrounds life on the cut from the early days onward. With regard specifically to the art work, I would recommend Tony Lewery's 'Flowers Afloat', ISBN 0-7153-0145-4. Tom Chaplin's 'The Narrow Boat Book' is also good on the overall history including the boats, ISBN 0-905483-05-7 For more on how horses were used on the cut: 'The Horse on the Cut' by Donald J. Smith. ISBN 0-85059-514-2, might be difficult to find a copy. Mine was ex-library. Many pictures of 'nostins' (nose tins) in use along with harness.
  4. Two that stick in my memory from my despatch riding days (and not canal oriented). On the wall beside the Northwick Park roundabout in Harrow; NICHOLAS PARSONS IS THE NEO OPIATE OF THE WORKING CLASSES Must have been sixty feet long. And a short and sweet one on building site hoarding in Newman Street W1; DON'T TELL THEM MICHAEL No idea who Michael was, or what he was not to tell. In 1983, just about every balance beam and bridge on the Ashton had EGGY scrawled on them.
  5. Salmon's Lane Lock. The bridge below the lock was a footbridge and beyond was Salmon Lane road bridge (barely visible), beyond that still, the railway bridge or possibly viaduct carrying the London & Blackwall Railway, which may have a train crossing from right to left (carriages appearing). https://maps.nls.uk/geo/explore/#zoom=18&lat=51.51480&lon=-0.03521&layers=168&b=1 David Mack beat me to it!
  6. Mount Pleasant, Trafalgar Square, or the headquarters in St Martins Le Grand? I would plump for St Martins Le Grand. It fits the time span being built in 1829 until demolition in 1912.
  7. https://tinyurl.com/ymjrhvtc Next door.
  8. Another gem I watch now and then is 'The Maggie'. Tales of a disreputable 'Puffer' and crew working a load from Glasgow to the Western Isles. 'Events' and characters abound. Black and white as you would expect.
  9. The West Watford link for Lady Capel's https://www.westwatfordhistorygroup.org/2019/07/the-canal-at-watford.html And a bit on Lady Capel https://reedprepub.org/capel-of-hadham-and-cassiobury/
  10. I doubt the BCN boats had much in the way of colouring. It was after all a Navigation Company first and foremost, and most of their boats were open day boats - with a few having very short cabins amounting to little more than shelters, with at best a bottle stove. Fore ends might have got some red along the top bend, a yellow crescent at each end of the red, and a number in white on the red. Tony Lewery's 'Narrow Boat Painting' depicts some examples on 123. Even the BCN Blue Book makes no references to colours, and the few line drawings are in B & W, and of long distance boats. Hardly a good example of a livery, but rather typical of very basic elements.
  11. BW (as was) recognised YARMOUTH (1914) as qualifying for historic discount, though it was originally a horse boat and ten feet longer. I can't remember how much of the boat (any boat?) claiming historic discount had to BE part of the original, I thought it might have been about two thirds, but I might be wrong. Certainly all the hull sides and fore end were original, the cabin and engine were not.
  12. Ex-hire boats - 'historic'? Any motor vehicle over 40yrs old can be officially classified as 'historic', whether it carried commodities or people. A hire boat could be called a working boat, as it earned income for its owner. Same can be said for a hire car - "It's an ex-Hertz!" But I doubt it would make it any more desirable to own or drive. Lot of fuss over not very much.
  13. The Army/NATO launch - took the image years ago, can't remember where from. It may have been parked up in the gravel pit marina below Widewater. I feel certain it's an image I took, maybe 12 - 15yrs ago. I seem to recall mooching around the bits and pieces while TYCHO was being sign written.
  14. Must have been a life-saver for some down'd crews. Not so sure about this one though . . .
  15. Seriously unimpressed. Think of the condensation! Impractical in so many ways. Where it once lived (and briefly most like): https://tinyurl.com/mpz8e8zs
  16. Unless for display purposes, most maintenance boats were kept plain and simple. Not even a yellow tunnel band. You will of course be familiar with this one: Notice the chain around the pile driver is painted.
  17. That was Carbodies Ltd. in Coventry, later called LTI.
  18. Industrial grade flip-flops.
  19. For some species, possibly. I like it. Can't be more that 3' 6" in width. Can't see much point in having a brass tiller when the wooden one seems more practical. What's the engine? Any one know? Think I would prefer a motorised skiff with overnight canopy. Must be fun though.
  20. Bottles are good. Of all the home brews that get made, how many are stored in tins? And who would want to?
  21. I've heard it can be put in tins . . .
  22. The Mill at Atherstone. The Maid of the Mill at the far end. Looks a bit sorry for itself nowadays: https://tinyurl.com/5e9xnuzu
  23. Went down the Rufford arm (branch?) in 1983, no such warning sign back then. Lots of floating reed islands though. Ring any bells?
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