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Can I visit my boat to winterise it?


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15 hours ago, john6767 said:

That is fine for the marina to say that, but in that case what is your reasonable excuse for leaving the place where you live.  I can’t creativity come up with something that would work for the purpose of checking the boat.

 

Given that the rules 'allow' a short drive so that one can take exercise, have a short drive to your marina / place of mooring and then walk to the boat to carry out essential winterisation maintenance. Creative enough??

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Just now, Alan de Enfield said:

 

Much of the problem we have is people trying to find a loop-hole to allow then to continue doing what they want.

If folks actually applied not only the 'words' but the 'spirit' of them we would be in a better situation.

Its only another 26.5 days until it ends, for some that will be the rest of their lives

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7 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

To seek medical assistance, including to donate blood, attend medical trials or take Covid tests or a vaccine.

 

Interesting. "Seeking medical assistance" implies dealing with an unexpected health situation, but there is nothing in the list about attending a routine/prebooked medical (or dental) appointment. So is that still permitted?

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17 minutes ago, David Mack said:

 

Interesting. "Seeking medical assistance" implies dealing with an unexpected health situation, but there is nothing in the list about attending a routine/prebooked medical (or dental) appointment. So is that still permitted?

Yes it is allowed, and it is allowed for someone to accompany you there.  I was concerned about that, as my wife has an appointment where she is not allowed to drive afterwards (eyes), and I was concerned if it was allowed for me to take her or if she would have to get a taxi.  Don’t use interpretations look at at actual legislation, whilst it is not the easiest to read it is the only way of getting the real situation.

Edited by john6767
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21 minutes ago, Col_T said:

 

Given that the rules 'allow' a short drive so that one can take exercise, have a short drive to your marina / place of mooring and then walk to the boat to carry out essential winterisation maintenance. Creative enough??

The legislation does not, as far as I can see, put a limit on how far you can travel for exercise, or to visit a public open space.  So distance is not the issue, but checking on a boat is not exactly exercise, and once you go inside the boat then that is a clear no no as far as I can see.

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I'm always suspicious of these lists from newspapers. They tend to be no more reliable than social media, and usually make no distinction between advice and law. I do find it interesting that apparently you can go sailing as it's exercise, unlike narrowboating when you've just got to do locks...

But this is only for a month, not even the coldest one, so can't see why leaving it till December is going to be a problem. There was enough notice of this to get a fair bit done before lockdown, surely?

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4 minutes ago, Arthur Marshall said:

But this is only for a month, not even the coldest one, so can't see why leaving it till December is going to be a problem.

Oh no it's not just November!

My suspicion is it will be renewed in December until for 3weeks and then resume on January 2nd.

It appears that people are not doing what is needed so it will be there for longer.

Still once the fines start to ramp up the treasury might make some money back?

 

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1 hour ago, Col_T said:

 

Given that the rules 'allow' a short drive so that one can take exercise, have a short drive to your marina / place of mooring and then walk to the boat to carry out essential winterisation maintenance. Creative enough??

Depends upon the rules of the marina where your boat is berthed.

 

Castle Marina's say:

To remind you of the new rules that are relevant to us all -

  1. You should stay at home where possible
  2. You should avoid travelling in/out of your local area
  3. Although you can visit outdoor public spaces with family, the marinas are private property not public spaces.
  4. You cannot travel to your boat unless essential
  5. You cannot stay overnight on your boat - unless your boat is your home (primary residence).
  6. Holidays on your boat are not allowed.

Visit and risk being asked to leave and take your boat elsewhere?

 

 

Edited by Ray T
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Even if we didn't live about 300 miles from our boat, I don't think we would visit even for a short while to winterise it.  I think most of the boats moored near us just now are liveaboards and as the pontoons are quite narrow  it would be virtually impossible to keep even 1 metre apart from anyone else. Better for the safety of our boating neighbours and ourselves that we stay away from the marina. Visiting would just be selfish on our part. 

 

haggis

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We winterised our boat a week ago. After all, plenty of notice was given and even before it was officially announced, it was pretty obvious where Englandshire was heading. Cases in Tamworth, where our boat is, had taken quite a surge.

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5 minutes ago, nicknorman said:

We winterised our boat a week ago. After all, plenty of notice was given and even before it was officially announced, it was pretty obvious where Englandshire was heading. Cases in Tamworth, where our boat is, had taken quite a surge.

yes, we did the same but if  we hadn't, I don't think we would go down and do it any time soon.

 

haggis

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Exercised  on the bike to the boat 14 miles. Exercised from the locked gate to the boat.

More exercise moved ton of coal unexpectedly  found on the tug deck. 
Did stretches afterwards due to damaged back, ( shake that broom, make mopping motions, polish that paint) 
Exercised 18 miles home.

Finger exercise to pay for coal.

 

Roads heaving with Audi’s and Wang Wovery type vehicles, no doubt doing charitable or essential work,  ( essential workers get paid more than I ever did as a nurse, a 6 year old car was my best ever) 

Good days exercise.

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1 hour ago, Loddon said:

Oh no it's not just November!

My suspicion is it will be renewed in December until for 3weeks and then resume on January 2nd.

It appears that people are not doing what is needed so it will be there for longer.

Still once the fines start to ramp up the treasury might make some money back?

 

I find it significant that Furlough has been extended until March.    You can't help but wonder why if we aren't going to be locked down.

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A relative has a 17 year old son. He has found that a girl is more important than playing, quite successfully, football.

 

He spends a lot of time at his girlfriends parents house. Sometimes on their own. Not ideal. Now with the lockdown sonny boy has a dilemma. Stay at home or go against mum and dads wishes and stay with girlie.

 

Opinions please.

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We winterised our boat on Tuesday. Our boatyard have asked us not to visit until the lockdown is over. However that are going to do an end of season engine service for us. I could have done it but its an awkward engine to work onand I'm not as lithe and supple as I used to be!! So I prefer to pay to get it done. I know that the yard will atke good care of our boat whilst we can't get to it especially if the river goes into flood.

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4 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

Maybe this will help focus the mind :

 

 

People in England now face £200 on-the-spot fines for leaving their house without a ‘reasonable excuse’.

New laws to enforce the month-long lockdown include the power for police to impose the penalties across the land.

Under the law, in force until December 2, no person may “leave or be outside” the place they are living without an excuse set out in law.

The place where you are living includes your home, garden, passages, stairways, garages and outhouses.

But it doesn’t include second homes or holiday homes, and the law has an exemption for people who are homeless. Protests are also not allowed.

 

If the fine is paid within 14 days, it halves to £100. For repeat offenders it doubles each time, up to £6,400.

Police don’t need to prove you broke the law to give you a fine - only to suspect you did so. That means you could find yourself fighting a fine in court.

 

If you do go down this route, you’d have to prove you had one of the following reasonable excuses.

And if you lose a fight in court, you’d get not just a higher fine, but also a criminal record.

So it’s important you know the law. Here’s the list of reasonable excuses in full:

  • If it is ‘reasonable necessary’ to “buy goods or obtain services from” businesses that remain open - either for yourself, household members, or a “vulnerable person” or their household member.
  • To withdraw or deposit money in a bank or building society or similar business.
  • To “take exercise outside”, either alone, with members of your household or support/childcare bubble, or with one person from another household. Under this exemption, there must just be two of you in total - though kids under 5 don’t count towards the limit.
  • To attend a place of worship (though they’re only staying open for private prayer).
  • To attend a Remembrance Sunday event.
  • To visit estate or letting agents or show homes; view properties to buy or rent; prepare a property to move, buy, rent or sell; or move house.
  • To visit someone in your support bubble or childcare bubble. A childcare bubble is when two households join together for informal childcare for a child under 13.
  • To pick up takeaway food or drink.
  • To visit a waste disposal or recycling centre.
  • To attend work, education or training, or provide voluntary or charitable series, if it’s not reasonable to do so from home.
  • To provide care or assistance to a vulnerable person.
  • To provide emergency assistance to any person.
  • To fulfil a legal obligation, including attending court or satisfying bail conditions.
  • To access social services, DWP services, victim of crime services, and asylum and immigration services and interviews.
  • If you’re an elite athlete, to continue training or competition.
  • To seek medical assistance, including to donate blood, attend medical trials or take Covid tests or a vaccine.
  • To avoid injury or illness or escape risk of harm.
  • To be with a mother giving birth, at her request.
  • To visit a household, close family member or friend who is being treated in hospital, a hospice or care home (local rules on visits permitting).
  • To attend a support group, including for domestic abuse victims, addicts and LGBT people, or provide or receive respite care.
  • To visit a household, close family member or friend you reasonably believe is dying.
  • To attend a funeral or wake, or burial ground or garden of remembrance, though there are limits on the numbers who can attend.
  • To attend a marriage or civil partnership, but again there are strict limits on numbers.
  • To allow children with separated parents to move between those two parents’ homes.
  • There are also certain exemptions for children in care and those preparing to be adopted.
  • To visit a vet.
  • To walk or otherwise exercise your pet.
  • To return home if you were on holiday before the lockdown came into force.
  • To visit a close family or friend in prison.

I read this site a lot, but, as I am based on the Broads, rarely post. But I can't let this pass without comment. It is incorrect in so many ways, being someone's loose interpretation of guidance from who knows whom. I won't list the inaccuracies, but urge members to read the regulations for themselves. They're written in plain English and are simpler to understand than some of the convoluted guidance that's doing the rounds.

 

Just two particularly important points from the quoted guidance:

 

1. "Police don’t need to prove you broke the law to give you a fine - only to suspect you did so." Totally wrong -  the regulations say:

 

"21.—(1) An authorised person may issue a fixed penalty notice to anyone that the authorised person reasonably believes—
(a) has committed an offence under these Regulations, and
(b) is aged 18 or over."

 

"Reasonably believes" is a far stronger requirement than "suspect".

 

2. The guidance totally ignores a very important (to boaters) exemption, "to visit a public outdoor place for the purposes of open air recreation". A public waterway is considered to be "a public outdoor place", and all forms of boating, from paddleboarding to motor boating, are considered to be "recreation".

 

 

Edited by Paladine
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1 hour ago, Paladine said:

The guidance totally ignores a very important (to boaters) exemption, "to visit a public outdoor place for the purposes of open air recreation". A public waterway is considered to be "a public outdoor place", and all forms of boating, from paddleboarding to motor boating, are considered to be "recreation".

But as been previously mentioned Marinas are not 'public spaces' so how can you justify visiting a "private outdoor place to winterise your boat", hardly :

 

a) Public space

b) Recreational activity

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13 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

But as been previously mentioned Marinas are not 'public spaces' so how can you justify visiting a "private outdoor place to winterise your boat", hardly :

 

a) Public space

b) Recreational activity

I wasn't particularly trying to justify going to a marina to winterise a boat. I was pointing out that the guidance you quoted was so full of flaws as to be unreliable.

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