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Mike Adams

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Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Woking

Previous Fields

  • Occupation
    Engineer
  • Boat Name
    White Heather
  • Boat Location
    Woking/Brinklow

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  1. I had one of these twin tubs and mine had two separate motors, one for the washer and one for the spinner. I never tried using them both at once but it worked fine on a 500W 24v inverter using the spin drier after the washer. The current will be large running from 12v say 50A so you need the battery close to the inverter or with large diameter cables otherwise the voltage drop to the inverter will make it shut down. Easy to measure with a multimeter.
  2. I was just thinking about when we leave the EU and importing a boat what the charges might be - I remember importing a car from Japan and the Import Duties and VAT were very significant and might well outwiegh the saving by purchasing in Holland. In about 1987 I went looking for barges/ boats in Holland, Germany and France. The cheaper ones always had some drawback i.e too deep , horrible fit out etc. In the end I bought a GRP boat in the UK and had ten happy years cruisng around the continent. I think it must be an expensive nightmare trying to find a mooring for a dutch barge in the UK and in my last couple of years in France/Germany anything over 15m is often difficult to find a mooring while cruising. If I were to do it again I would probably go for ex hire GRP cruiser.
  3. What I forgot to mention was of course that the engine was moved to the rear underdeck during Jason's ownership/fitout. Some years before that the bare hull was lying at Norwood Top Lock and I tried to buy it from the owner without success, the engine wasn't present but I was told there was one for it. I assume this was the one that went into Iona. So the FR3 would have been the last engine in the original engine room. Positioning the smaller ford engine under the rear deck made most of the boats usable accommodation.
  4. I am sure the engine put into White Heather by Jason was a lowline Ford 6D. When I swapped the boat for Coronis that was still in it but I took that out because it was blelching smoke and leaking oil everywhere and fitted a Dorman 3LB. Unfortunately that increased the draught too much so after an attempted trip up the oxford canal I took it out and installed the Toyota engine which it still has today. That was supposed to be a temporary solution but since it has run for some 20 years now with only oil and filter changes I haven't done anything about changing it out. That makes 6 engines in 88 years if it had a Petter at some stage.!
  5. Thanks Pete. I have never seen this picture before and at 1967 it probably predates the one below which shows the boat, above Camden lock I think, and you can just make out the BW wave logo on the side. It also shows the very large cut out ventilator on the port side. I thought the FR3M was a water cooled engine so I am not sure if there was another engine fitted between the Robey and the FR3. The first photo I posted shows the boat with what looks like the original engine and funnel removed and judging by the waterline quite empty but still with the Marylebone council shed wheelhouse that was fitted to both White Heather and Tyburn (ex W and B Birmigham). Maybe it was during a BTW refit. When I first can about the boat in the 1970's it was derilict at the top of Norwood locks when it had been disposed of by BW and without engine.
  6. Now I have some forced time on my hands I am trying to put together as much history as I can on my GU Paddington Arm canal tug 'White Heather' . I remember ther was a photo in an old Waterways World(when it was in black and white) showing a view of Hanwell Yard(Norwood Top) where the boat was based with White Heather in what appeared to be BTC or BTW colours of blue with yellow coach lines and a BTW logo on the funnel. If anyone is browsing through old WW's please let me know if they find it. Unfortunately I threw all mine out some years ago. Here is picture of the boat when it was rather sad and without its funnel.
  7. Try a ISSPRO R8585M programmable tachometer. Works on the alternator or magnet on flywheel.
  8. You will be fine. I went around the Paddington Arm with 8'6" air draught and drawing 4'6".
  9. New rules on MOT testing for light vehicles Due to the unfolding COVID-19 situation, cars and vans and motorcycles due their MOT from 30 March 2020 will have their MOT extended by 6 months. This will continue until confirmed otherwise. Let us hope the same will apply to the Boat Safety Certificate
  10. I installed my system using Speedfit some months ago, using a central backbone under the floor with tees up to the radiators in copper because of tight bends and tidyness when pipes are in view. Speedfit is much quicker but I did have to allow for expansion of the pipes and used expansion sleeves which I think made it more time consuming. I have easy access to all the joints so I am hoping it will work out over time. In retropect I wished I had used copper throughout as when it gets up to full temperature the plastic becomes quite soft and if you had an overheat I am not sure what would happen. I used 22mm rubber hose from the engine room webasto to the underfloor pipes. I didn't consider just using automotive water hose for the main system but in hindsight that could be a good option if you hava an awkward route. Not exposed to sunlight it would last a good many years.
  11. If they are the very heavy ones like they use on pavements I would break them into two or three pieces first by hitting with a large hammer, mark them so they can fit back together - stops you getting an injury trying to lift them.
  12. I've got some glulam beams in my house but they are just softwood. I dont think they would last more than a few weeks under water. If you don't want a steel bottom why not laminate say a 40mm thick GRP plate and bolt it on to the bottom -you could do it in sections and laminate them together.
  13. I had some experience of a composite boat in the 1990's. My understanding was that during the working life of these boats the bottoms would wear out and need to be replaced depending on the usage and it was easier for a canal boatyard to do this where no shipyard facilities were available. I guess when they were working nobody cared much about a bit of a leak as you would always have some rainwater in the bottom. Much the same for all of us that had wooden cruising boats - some water was inevitable in the bilge. In my case the boat had been re-bottomed with poor quality elm and in places it always leaked a bit and with a replaced softwood keelson it had a very limited life. the boat was fully converted with inaccessible floors so it was very difficult to see what was going on below the floor. Also and inexperienced helm misjudging a lock could easily cause a leak. The bottom was eventually replaced by steel. The lifetime of the bottom in this case was about 15 years. I am sure that using tropical hardwoods results in a much better performance and a longer life and I might be tempted to buy a unconverted boat with that construction and keep its historic status. I can't see that it would be a good investment for anyone wanting a converted boat.
  14. Thanks Dreamer. I thought I had a complete manual but I didn't have that page for some reason that gives the base engine types. I've bought the engine now and it looks as new with 110 hours on it. Always nice to have a spare lump then you are bound not to need it! Going on along cruise this year so it maybe gives a bit of piece of mind as all I need it a bit of solid bank to swap over an engine.
  15. Great! I have found a 4LE1 on ebay which I will try to get. Thanks again.
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