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Advice please, we have always painted outside cabin sides with International. Painting looms again this summer and is very over due. Recommendations for make of paint would be appreciated. Would we better using one of the makes known that are used for boats or would something like Leyland be just as good. Thanks 

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You're naming one of the most expensive brands of paint.

It doesn't matter whose paint you buy, you're only lending it, it's not there for very long. 

Your preparation, application, the bushes and trees on the offside, whether you store your boat inside over Winter and how many pairs of Bri-nylon socks you own are more important.

Paint is initially a preservative, if it is decorative too then all well and good, the longer it lasts is probably down to you.  In eighteen months time a company in the midlands will be launching a service to vinyl wrap boats.

zenataomm

PS I might have got carried away a tad there and completely made up the bit about vinyl wrapping, in fact I did.

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39 minutes ago, zenataomm said:

It doesn't matter whose paint you buy, you're only lending it, it's not there for very long. 

Borrowing, please!

40 minutes ago, zenataomm said:

PS I might have got carried away a tad there and completely made up the bit about vinyl wrapping, in fact I did.

It exists as a service.  Any of the firms that can wrap cars and vans can do it, but at a price. 

You also need to have a sound paint layer underneath it, or it bubbles horribly.

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3 minutes ago, TheBiscuits said:

Borrowing, please!

It exists as a service.  Any of the firms that can wrap cars and vans can do it, but at a price. 

You also need to have a sound paint layer underneath it, or it bubbles horribly.

Also, as far as I understand, one of the issues is that repairing damaged vinyl wrap (as inevitably damage will occur on a boat) is not as simple as slapping a bit of paint on.

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13 hours ago, Tonker said:

Advice please, we have always painted outside cabin sides with International. Painting looms again this summer and is very over due. Recommendations for make of paint would be appreciated. Would we better using one of the makes known that are used for boats or would something like Leyland be just as good. Thanks 

What are you hoping to achieve?  If you want to be ahead in the shiny baot stakes then you will want to get back to steel and build up a coach-paint scheme.  International is one of these and, as said, they are all pricey.

If on the other hand you are more interested in boating and keeping the rust at bay is the main aim then any decent exterior paint designed for steel will do.

Whatever you buy it wants to be oil based and you must apply it in accordance with the instructions either in the Technical Data Sheet or on the tins. 

 

Preparation is everything.

 

N

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11 hours ago, TheBiscuits said:

Borrowing, please!

y.

No, you have bought it outright, so you aren't borrowing it, but you're lending it to the boat for the nonce, as after a while the boat will start to return it to you in strips and flakes.

 

We use Craftmaster which covers well and is quite long-lasting. Cheap it is not.

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I have tried a variety of different makes of paint for the boat including "marine" brands and so called coach painting brands.  I am very much an amateur in the painting lark and have found that some of the "marine" brands seem to be very poor at flowing out after laying off where as Leyland oil based gloss flowed out well on my 3" red coach stripe. I await the result of trying to paint the main cabin side with Leyland green gloss paint in a month or two.

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11 hours ago, TheBiscuits said:

It exists as a service.  Any of the firms that can wrap cars and vans can do it, but at a price. 

You also need to have a sound paint layer underneath it, or it bubbles horribly.

Didn’t I see a leopard print boat at Crick one year?

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4 minutes ago, Tony Brooks said:

I have tried a variety of different makes of paint for the boat including "marine" brands and so called coach painting brands.  I am very much an amateur in the painting lark and have found that some of the "marine" brands seem to be very poor at flowing out after laying off where as Leyland oil based gloss flowed out well on my 3" red coach stripe. I await the result of trying to paint the main cabin side with Leyland green gloss paint in a month or two.

On a typical commercial paint job, the paint is only 10% of the total cost with the other 90% the surfact preparation and application. Doubling the cost of the paint therefore is not as bad as it seems. For us mere mortals, where we are doing the prep and application, the paint cost is the only thing we see. Going for a cheap option may work, but paints sold as 'marine grade' will have been tested to a higher level so should work. A cheaper grade may not work as well. Tony, though, hits the nail on the head. How easy is it to apply? I've not used many of the current marine coatings so cannot comment but some will be easier to apply and flow out, especially where you have a hot metal surface - 40°C is common in summar - and that plays hell with brushability and subsequent flow.

Personally I would buy a pucker marine coating, to ensure the paint should perform the best, but try and get recommendations on how they perform when you brush them on a sunny day in summer (not this week). You spend a bit more but it should last longer. As said earlier, surface prep and application is more important than the coating. Follow the manufactures advice to the letter.

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1 minute ago, Dr Bob said:

have a hot metal surface - 40°C is common in summar - and that plays hell with brushability and subsequent flow.

Its never that cold where we spend summer, but the rest of your post all makes good sense

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4 minutes ago, rusty69 said:

Its never that cold where we spend summer, but the rest of your post all makes good sense

Quite right, I wouldnt paint at minus 40 either (no need for units). Whata mistaka to maka.

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I am fully aware of the heat thing so get up very early in the summer to leather off, wait for the dew to dry, light rub down with 400 paper de-dust & degrease so I can still put the next coat on while it is cool and before too many flies get around. Usually completed by 7.30.

The professional repaint used Masons and it started to fail within a very few years. After a few years of polishing to keep oxidisation at bay the undercoat was showing through in some places and the sign writing was also patchy. If I am to keep the boat looking presentable It seems I nee to repaint every few years so its a "Forth bridge" type job doing a little each years so in my view the longevity of the paint finish only has to be adequate for my needs.

 

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Folk on ere don't like Rylard, but I do. I find that it doesn't bloom as easily as other oil paints if the atmosphere is a bit damp. It does seem to take longer to harden through than other oil paints though, but that seems to make it last longer anyway. and its cheaper than most other marine oil paint.

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1 hour ago, Athy said:

No, you have bought it outright, so you aren't borrowing it, but you're lending it to the boat for the nonce, as after a while the boat will start to return it to you in strips and flakes.

 

Thanks, it's exactly what I meant, I do know the difference between Borrow and Lend

It's Your Round and My Round I have difficulty with.

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7 minutes ago, zenataomm said:

Thanks, it's exactly what I meant, I do know the difference between Borrow and Lend

It's Your Round and My Round I have difficulty with.

:D

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54 minutes ago, bizzard said:

Folk on ere don't like Rylard, but I do. I find that it doesn't bloom as easily as other oil paints if the atmosphere is a bit damp. It does seem to take longer to harden through than other oil paints though, but that seems to make it last longer anyway. and its cheaper than most other marine oil paint.

I am a poor amateur when it comes to painting, but I keep trying. Rylards appears to mostly dry quite quickly but then stays a little bit tacky for a couple of days which is a pain, I also feel that it does not cover as ell as most other paints so will need an extra coat but it does brush on very nicely, so its a bit of swings and roundabouts.

.................Dave

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Thumbs up for Bailey's coach enamel from me.  Me and mrs did the whole boat last summer on the shropshire underneath the M54. Great finish with just a Harris brush and some sandpaper.  It does dry fast though so you have to be well prepared before you start.  But that means you can paint a coat on, and by the time you have cleared up and had some breakfst  the paint is dry enough foy you to set off on your travels again!

 

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