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1 hour ago, Alan de Enfield said:

School lunch 2/6

Ours was 174446

 

Late 50s / early 60's

 

Comparing Co-Op numbers it must have been a few years prior to yours.

We didnt have a Co op

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Before fire was lit in the morning when I was little mum used to light the gas oven and hang my clothes on the open door. 

Paralised throat when swigging school milk just above freezing. 

School dinners were 1 shilling but compared to mum's were crap, preferred a 15 min run home instead. 

Quite a few poor kids with minimal clothing in winter, got their meals free and they were better than what was on offer at home. 

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We had nothing-- use to live in a tiny old, tumbled down house with great holes in' err roof.

A house? You were lucky to have a house! We used to sleep in one room, 26 of us. And half the floor was missing. We were all huddled in one corner, for fear of falling.

You were lucky to have a room. We used to live in corridors.

Oh...We used to dream 'a livin' in a corridor. Woulda' been a palace for us. We used to live in an old watertank on top of a rubbish tip. Got Woked up every mornin by havin the lot of the rotten fish dumped all over us.

House? Why woulda say house? It were only a hole in the ground, covered by a couple foot o torn canvas. But they were house to us!

We were evicted from our hole in the ground. We had to go live in lake.

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12 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

Our neighbour used to collect those bins from the Schools, Hospitals etc etc for their pigs.

They had many 100's of pigs and had a contract with Walls (the 'sausage' people, not the Ice cream)

Swill-boiling day was a day everyone for 'miles' around kept their windows closed as the black greasy smoke would sit in the valley.

 

Walls used the fat to make the ice cream, that's why they made sausages and ice cream.   The pork fat wasn't a lot different composition-wise to the cream now used to make dairy ice cream.

 

Used to get 1s a day for school lunch.  I preferred to go down the shops for 6 pen'oth of chips, a thrupny apple and a Mars Bar.

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I remember taking 5/- "dinner money" (up North, dinner was what you ate at lunchtime, perhaps still is) which was, I think, collected by the form teacher each Monday morning. I don't remember the price going up during my schooldays. I suppose modern pupils pay for their school dinners by direct debit.

   At junior school I got 9d a week pocket money. I'm not sure how my parents arrived at that figure. When I passed my eleven-plus, they doubled it to 1/6d a week. I felt rich.

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6 minutes ago, Athy said:

I remember taking 5/- "dinner money" (up North, dinner was what you ate at lunchtime, perhaps still is) which was, I think, collected by the form teacher each Monday morning. I don't remember the price going up during my schooldays. I suppose modern pupils pay for their school dinners by direct debit.

   At junior school I got 9d a week pocket money. I'm not sure how my parents arrived at that figure. When I passed my eleven-plus, they doubled it to 1/6d a week. I felt rich.

I recently asked my daughter who lives in the proper south as in Cornwall who was bemused when I asked if my grankids still took dinner money. She said of course and what else would you call it. 

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14 minutes ago, Athy said:

 I don't remember the price going up during my schooldays. I suppose modern pupils pay for their school dinners by direct debit.

 

I paid 5/-  a week for my school meals as a kid and when I started teaching I was collecting 5/- per child and issuing 5 "dinner tickets".   Perhaps purely a Cumbria idea but we had them at school as a kid as well.

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26 minutes ago, Jerra said:

I paid 5/-  a week for my school meals as a kid and when I started teaching I was collecting 5/- per child and issuing 5 "dinner tickets".   Perhaps purely a Cumbria idea but we had them at school as a kid as well.

I shudder to think what proportion of your form had lost the rest of their tickets by Tuesday! In my experience, any such loss - pen, ruler, football boots....-was accompanied by a plaintive cry of "Please Sir, somebody's stolen my....."

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7 minutes ago, Athy said:

I shudder to think what proportion of your form had lost the rest of their tickets by Tuesday! In my experience, any such loss - pen, ruler, football boots....-was accompanied by a plaintive cry of "Please Sir, somebody's stolen my....."

Strangely dinner tickets did not go missing.  You knew no ticket no dinner.    Yes "Please Sir, somebody's stolen my....." was common for everything else.

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1 hour ago, Athy said:

I remember taking 5/- "dinner money" (up North, dinner was what you ate at lunchtime, perhaps still is) which was, I think, collected by the form teacher each Monday morning. I don't remember the price going up during my schooldays.

 

Pretty sure it was 5 Bob a week for me at junior school in the second half of the 60s. And yes it was called "dinner money" even though we were in Solihull.

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15 minutes ago, David Mack said:

 

Pretty sure it was 5 Bob a week for me at junior school in the second half of the 60s. And yes it was called "dinner money" even though we were in Solihull.

Perhaps that usage was common to schools throughout the land. Come to think of it, when I lived in London there was a restaurant on the next street called 'School Dinners', which I believe served bangers & mash, jam sponge and custard, etc, as a kind of antidote to fancy London food.

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1 hour ago, Athy said:

Perhaps that usage was common to schools throughout the land. Come to think of it, when I lived in London there was a restaurant on the next street called 'School Dinners', which I believe served bangers & mash, jam sponge and custard, etc, as a kind of antidote to fancy London food.

assuming it wasn't the sort of school dinners that Boris and his ilk enjoyed in their various clubs?

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3 hours ago, Hudds Lad said:

assuming it wasn't the sort of school dinners that Boris and his ilk enjoyed in their various clubs?

It was designed to pander to their fantasies!  The School Dinnergirls (waitresses) were one its main attractions when it opened (reputedly).

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6 minutes ago, Batavia said:

It was designed to pander to their fantasies!  The School Dinnergirls (waitresses) were one its main attractions when it opened (reputedly).

You knew of it too, did you, or perhaps there several of them around the country? The one I'm referring to was in Baker Street, London; I lived in the next street from 1978 to 1982, so it would have been operational during that period. I never went in (well, I got real school dinners, at least during term time, so I didn't need to!) so I don't know what it was like inside.

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16 minutes ago, Athy said:

You knew of it too, did you, or perhaps there several of them around the country? The one I'm referring to was in Baker Street, London; I lived in the next street from 1978 to 1982, so it would have been operational during that period. I never went in (well, I got real school dinners, at least during term time, so I didn't need to!) so I don't know what it was like inside.

I think that the first one was in the City, but the one I knew was in Baker Street.  One visit was more than enough - primarily due to the other patrons, rather than the food.

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Our school got ‘progressive’ .

They started with a tick register if you had paid for meals you got marked off.
Free school meals went last. 

They decided this was unfair as everyone knew who the free school dinner kids were. So instead we got the ticket system issued weekly.

However being teachers they decided that paid meal tickets should be blue , and free ones pink.

I can still remember the shouts of ‘pink ticket pink ticket echoing round the queue.

As a monitor I had to then go and sort it out...

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On 09/01/2021 at 14:30, Ray T said:

At my youngest daughters wedding reception I was banned from telling jokes as I am renowned within the family as being good at bad jokes and bad at good jokes.

I did however get a joke in at the end of my speech. 

 

"It has been a very emotional day, even the cake is in tiers."

Tell us about the jokes at your older daughter(s) weddings, and we might understand the reason for this ban.

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45 minutes ago, Scholar Gypsy said:

Tell us about the jokes at your older daughter(s) weddings, and we might understand the reason for this ban.

@Scholar Gypsy

 

Did you hear about the girl who married a second lieutenant

No, why what happened?

The first one got away.

 

Getting married is a bit like being in a restaurant queue to pay for your meal.

You look at the man's tray in front and think I wish I'd had some of that.

 

Just for information I told the first one but thought better of the second comment.

 

Edited by Ray T
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12 hours ago, pig said:

We had nothing-- use to live in a tiny old, tumbled down house with great holes in' err roof.

A house? You were lucky to have a house! We used to sleep in one room, 26 of us. And half the floor was missing. We were all huddled in one corner, for fear of falling.

You were lucky to have a room. We used to live in corridors.

Oh...We used to dream 'a livin' in a corridor. Woulda' been a palace for us. We used to live in an old watertank on top of a rubbish tip. Got Woked up every mornin by havin the lot of the rotten fish dumped all over us.

House? Why woulda say house? It were only a hole in the ground, covered by a couple foot o torn canvas. But they were house to us!

We were evicted from our hole in the ground. We had to go live in lake.

Lake? Luxury mate! We lived in a bramble bush with a Woolworth's biscuit tin for a bed.........................

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