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Ok I messed up I need a battery key


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42 minutes ago, Tracy D'arth said:

He may have more important things to do. Not everyone spends all day on the computer/tablet/phone waffling on forums.          Thankfully.

Its a bit pointless asking for help and asking a question and not logging back in to look at the answers.

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23 minutes ago, mrsmelly said:

Its a bit pointless asking for help and asking a question and not logging back in to look at the answers.

He may be walking dejectedly along a muddy towpath towards the nearest chandlery.

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4 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

 

Or, just take the 'key' out of the domestic battery bank master switch and start the engine.

 

Simples !

 

That gets the engine started but prevents charging the domestic batteries, which is probably the reason for starting the engine in winter in lockdown.

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4 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

 

Or, just take the 'key' out of the domestic battery bank master switch and start the engine.

 

Simples !

Sounds too simple or may be just too difficult to try and work out on your own when you can ask on a forum and save thinking about a solution.

  

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11 minutes ago, TheBiscuits said:

 

That gets the engine started but prevents charging the domestic batteries, which is probably the reason for starting the engine in winter in lockdown.

Not if the alternator is wired directly to the batteries, it may however prevent him from using his 12v system. We don’t know how his boat is wired so no point in assuming anything. He may have one of those 1,2, both,off rotary isolation switches on his domestic who knows? 

Edited by PD1964
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9 minutes ago, PD1964 said:

He may have one of those 1,2, both,off rotary isolation switches on his domestic who knows? 

 

If that's the case he won't have another key to put in the engine isolator anyway.

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Exactly,  Who knows? As with your post not everyone wires their alternator via the isolation switch.  Every boat is different so no point in assuming or over thinking his need for a spare isolation key.

  Hopefully he has learnt to have a spare.👍

Edited by PD1964
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1 hour ago, ditchcrawler said:

It use to be very common 30 years ago

 

It had to be done that way as the forerunner of the BSS stated there was to be one isolation switch for both sustems.

 

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34 minutes ago, Loddon said:

It had to be done that way as the forerunner of the BSS stated there was to be one isolation switch for both sustems.

 

I never knew that after all the years I have been building and using boats. What reg was that under?

 

I have never wired a boat with one common isolator but then many old boats had a 1,2,both,off switch.

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23 minutes ago, Tracy D'arth said:

I never knew that after all the years I have been building and using boats. What reg was that under?

 

I have never wired a boat with one common isolator but then many old boats had a 1,2,both,off switch.

Cant quote the reg, I just remember it was part of the Certificate of Compliance in the early 90s  as I had to comply with it :(

C of C was the forerunner of the BSS.

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2 hours ago, Tracy D'arth said:

I never knew that after all the years I have been building and using boats. What reg was that under?

 

I have never wired a boat with one common isolator but then many old boats had a 1,2,both,off switch.

We still do.

Only fitted a few years ago.

High tech. Removed the unreliable silly split charge garbage, that was messing up the electrics.

our first boat didnt even have an isolator, one battery for engine start and domestics on a 45 ft colecraft, as supplied by them.

Gas lights too.

Kiss.

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There is actually a lot of sense in having an isolator in the negative, from a safety aspect. Apart from the fact that just the one switch disconnects everything, it means that once it's been disconnected you can work on the batteries knowing that accidental shorting of either terminal to hull by a spanner will not cause a big bang. There are many spurious reasons for it being in the positive, many of them invented by Gibbo (once of this forum) because his Smartgauge didn't like it being in the negative; the only good reason I know of for using the positive is that an engineer now would expect it to be there.

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13 hours ago, Keeping Up said:

There is actually a lot of sense in having an isolator in the negative, from a safety aspect. Apart from the fact that just the one switch disconnects everything, it means that once it's been disconnected you can work on the batteries knowing that accidental shorting of either terminal to hull by a spanner will not cause a big bang. 

Only if you have moved to the recent fascination with negative earth.

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19 hours ago, roland elsdon said:

We still do.

Only fitted a few years ago.

High tech. Removed the unreliable silly split charge garbage, that was messing up the electrics.

our first boat didnt even have an isolator, one battery for engine start and domestics on a 45 ft colecraft, as supplied by them.

Gas lights too.

Kiss.

We are of the same ilk having had a split charge relay failed due to stuck contacts, and a blocking diode catch fire. The off,1,both & 2 switch is far more safer and reliable.

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On 22/01/2021 at 19:20, LadyG said:

I have those all over my boat, and a spare, but I'm not near you, is that the only one you have? No invertor? 

They must be a key feature. :)

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On 22/01/2021 at 19:20, LadyG said:

I have those all over my boat, and a spare, but I'm not near you, is that the only one you have? No invertor? 

 

 

I think you may be getting confused over the function of an Inverter.

 

Edited by Alan de Enfield
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2 hours ago, ditchcrawler said:

Some inverters are wired in with their own master switch

Yes I’ve seen this on boats where they have a 3pin plug attached to the 240v power out cable of the inverter and when on shore power it’s not used, but plug contacts exposed. Then when your disconnected from shore line you unplug the shoreline 3pin and insert the inverter 3pin into the ring main socket and switch on the master switch between inverter and battery bank. Not the best system IMO.

Edited by PD1964
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2 hours ago, ditchcrawler said:

Some inverters are wired in with their own master switch

As is mine but I think Alan just meant could op not use the key from the inverter to get by? Not that it matters as the OP hasnt been arsed to look back at his post :banghead:

Edited by mrsmelly
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I wonder why the original poster hasn't been back, especially as Matty offered to take a key to him. I see from his profile that he is an electrical installer and if that is the case it seems odd that he didn't have a spare key on board. 

Puzzling 🙂 

haggis

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