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"Medium" length stern button


IanD

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10 hours ago, ditchcrawler said:

Isn't that a newish one

Yes it is, but because he is friends with some one then it is allowed to parade at Braunston Historic show

10 hours ago, ditchcrawler said:

 

 

10 hours ago, ditchcrawler said:

 

 

Edited by Tonka
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3 hours ago, Tonka said:

Yes it is, but because he is friends with some one then it is allowed to parade at Braunston Historic show

 

True (though it looks much more like a real working boat actually working than most of the unloaded trad ones around today) but that wasn't the point I was trying to make -- people going on about "real" boats with high T-studs (meaning deep hulls, like a Large Woolwich?) and lots of stacked tipcat/button stern fenders pulled up tight almost level with the deck are ignoring the fact that they're only built like this because they're designed to travel fully loaded, with low freeboard (and drawing about 4' so impossible in most places today) and the fenders just above the waterline where they're most effective (and not submerged) -- and the T-stud only a couple of feet above the waterline at most, like Hasty...

 

An unloaded working boat like this -- as most are today -- is very high out of the water, including the bow T-stud but also the stern fenders, which makes them rather less useful -- and less "real" (looking like in "the good old days"), unless you're a loaded fuel boat. Most boats nowadays -- including all modern ones, or replicas/trad boats that travel unloaded all the time -- would be better off with a lower-down fender where it's more useful, even though this doesn't look so "traditional"... 😉

 

Now expecting protests from those who think that a hull/T-stud looming 4' out of the water at the bow is how a "real" boat *should* look, as opposed to this which they were designed for... 😉

 

loaded.jpg

Edited by IanD
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26 minutes ago, Paul C said:

They're not even historic, most having engines. I believe canalmania occurred in the 1790s, well before engines. A good corollary might be, do you consider the Austin Maestro a classic car? A more accurate description would be, "fairly old".

 

They're historic as far as they go, meaning the 20th century -- few people really want to go back to pre-engine days, especially given that you can't use a horse on the towpath today.

 

At least Hasty looks very much how the boat is was copied from -- a tunnel tug -- would have looked when it was working, which makes it a bit strange that some people look down their nose at it because it's a replica and not an original "working boat" -- which nowadays rarely look like they did when they were working, which kind of defeats the point... 😉

Edited by IanD
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51 minutes ago, IanD said:

True (though it looks much more like a real working boat actually working than most of the unloaded trad ones around today) but that wasn't the point I was trying to make -- people going on about "real" boats with high T-studs (meaning deep hulls, like a Large Woolwich?) and lots of stacked tipcat/button stern fenders pulled up tight almost level with the deck are ignoring the fact that they're only built like this because they're designed to travel fully loaded, with low freeboard (and drawing about 4' so impossible in most places today) and the fenders just above the waterline where they're most effective (and not submerged) -- and the T-stud only a couple of feet above the waterline at most, like Hasty...

 

An unloaded working boat like this -- as most are today -- is very high out of the water, including the bow T-stud but also the stern fenders, which makes them rather less useful -- and less "real" (looking like in "the good old days"), unless you're a loaded fuel boat. Most boats nowadays -- including all modern ones, or replicas/trad boats that travel unloaded all the time -- would be better off with a lower-down fender where it's more useful, even though this doesn't look so "traditional"... 😉

 

Now expecting protests from those who think that a hull/T-stud looming 4' out of the water at the bow is how a "real" boat *should* look, as opposed to this which they were designed for... 😉

 

loaded.jpg

I assuming because there is only one emoji you are being serious 

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13 hours ago, IanD said:

Yes, but it's a fairly accurate replica of a steam-powered tunnel tug -- which many would say is far more "traditional" than ex-working boats with the holds converted to living space instead of being filled with cargo.

 

 

 

Considering that the original Hasty was built of wood and the "replica" is steel the word "fairly" is doing some heavy lifting there Ian. 😉

 

The tee stud and stem iron are old by the way, the stem iron having been salvaged from the wooden boat Clevanda.

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1 hour ago, adam1uk said:

None of this changes the fact that your boat would look much better with a tip at and button at the stern.

In your opinion... 😉

 

If I do go that way it'll because it does a better job as a fender, not how it looks. Which seems unlikely going by the resulting size and vertical position...

 

59 minutes ago, davidg said:

 

Considering that the original Hasty was built of wood and the "replica" is steel the word "fairly" is doing some heavy lifting there Ian. 😉

 

The tee stud and stem iron are old by the way, the stem iron having been salvaged from the wooden boat Clevanda.

That's why I said "fairly"...

 

I read up on the build years ago, hats off to the owner for putting all the effort in -- and using a few salvaged bits. Having hired a steamer many years ago I loved the silence, but practicality and running costs aren't so attractive -- a hybrid was the closest I could get today 🙂

Edited by IanD
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15 minutes ago, Tonka said:

Where do you put the Bukby Cans on a semi-trad ☺😉😉☺☺😉😉


You've got me there,

I was gonna say next to the chimney,

But there won’t be any of they either

 

 

A mop,

there has to be a mop?

every boat needs a mop,

with the colours of the boat painted in spiral fashion 👍

 

but if there’s no buckby can,

there’s nowt to rest mop on

 

I don’t think this has been thought out 

 

🥸🥸🥸🥸🥸🥸🥸🥸🥸🥸🥸🥸

 

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For the bow fender I cut a Pirelli P6000 tyre in half and bolted it to the stem. Treads were painted white. As you do. 

 

Obviously bow fenders are not needed but this one meant the boat could never get hung up on things and performed the function required in the byelaws. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, magnetman said:

For the bow fender I cut a Pirelli P6000 tyre in half and bolted it to the stem. Treads were painted white. As you do. 

 

Obviously bow fenders are not needed but this one meant the boat could never get hung up on things and performed the function required in the byelaws. 

 

 

You just have to have the front fender available for use, doesn't say you have to use it 😉

On one boat my front fender sat just in front of the gas locker lid for the 9 years I owned it. Looked like new 😂

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2 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

This just popped up on Facebook 

 

That'll be no coincidence. That'll be because Facebook snoops on you, tracking and recording everything you look at and read on the net to serve up stuff it thinks you will be interested in. Its seen you looking st discussions on here about Hasty and served you some more. 

 

I find it staggering that most people don't seem to mind it doing this!

 

 

 

 

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12 minutes ago, MtB said:

 

That'll be no coincidence. That'll be because Facebook snoops on you, tracking and recording everything you look at and read on the net to serve up stuff it thinks you will be interested in. Its seen you looking st discussions on here about Hasty and served you some more. 

 

I find it staggering that most people don't seem to mind it doing this!

 

 

If you seriously think Facebook reads/follows CWDF or people viewing it, you're even more paranoid than I previously thought...

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30 minutes ago, MtB said:

 

That'll be no coincidence. That'll be because Facebook snoops on you, tracking and recording everything you look at and read on the net to serve up stuff it thinks you will be interested in. Its seen you looking st discussions on here about Hasty and served you some more. 

 

I find it staggering that most people don't seem to mind it doing this!

 

 

 

 

 

I think most people understand and accept this as today's 'way of life'.

 

If you dont then its time to stop using the internet, loyalty cards, reward cards, mobile phones, in fact just live like a hermit and all will be OK.

 

Facebook will serve up adverts, posts and article's based on what groups you are a member of and/or what searches you do on there.

 

So a member of a group related to boating will get posts about boats in their feed. Thats just how it works.

Edited by M_JG
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52 minutes ago, IanD said:

 

If you seriously think Facebook reads/follows CWDF or people viewing it, you're even more paranoid than I previously thought...

 

Yes I'm paranoid. I know this because my doctor told me I am. 

 

Well he didn't actually say I am paranoid, but I could tell that's what he was thinking. 

 

 

 

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