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dave moore

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dave moore last won the day on June 20 2016

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About dave moore

  • Birthday 01/06/1949

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    West Midlands
  • Interests
    boating history and heritage
    working boats and boaters
    traditional music
    real ale and red wine
    all in no particular order!
  • Occupation
    boat decorator/signwriter
  • Boat Name
    Was Resolute

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  1. Some forum members may also be interested in “ The Life of LTC Rolt” by Victoria Owens. I was aware of his time with Cressy but this covers his complete life. Fascinating reading, to me at least.
  2. A friend of mine makes top quality traditional style fenders. I can put you in touch if you may be interested.
  3. It was not unknown for the boats carrying phosphorus waste to be pumped out en route to the Rattlechain pit. I recall boating past the site of Clayton’s yard in the late 60s with Tay, one of the gas boats. The prop wash stirred up the waste and fumes and small flames danced on the surface of the cut. Different days…..
  4. I sourced Creocote from Tool Station several years ago to re proof our fenders and had no issues at all. Different formula?
  5. I’m certain that the painter is Frank Nurser of Braunston. In these modern times, he is regarded as a master of traditional boat decoration, his apprentice Ron Hough carried the tradition in to the pleasure boating age. The work is prized by collectors, I have several examples of his work among mine. The two cans mentioned earlier were painted by him for the film “ Painted Boats” made in the late 1940s, the current owner also owns the boat featured in that film. I would keep it as it is, personally..on the auction market it might raise a sizeable sum…but that’s only money…..I’m not bidding, by the way.
  6. Many of the painters I work with use Kleen Edge tape, or Tesa 3434. Either way, it is important to thumb the contact edge well down. Ordinary masking tape is a waste of time in my experience. Wrights of Lymm, signwriters merchants, also offer an American plastic tape, the Edge, which I use on lettering and other jobs. Super stuff!
  7. I’m sorry, but I can’t help with identifying the painter. I’m inclined to agree with David that it is probably the work of an amateur, possibly a boater, seemingly painted carefully rather than with the practised ease of a dock painter. It would appear that early work carried a wider variety of flowers than are usually painted today. Some of the other stuff on display looks much more recent and the crockery and mug seem to have been influenced by the Ann Young book.
  8. Alvechurch experimented with the bulbous bow in the 80s.
  9. That’s the Kevin plaque, I think, rather than the gear change wheel. We got ours from Dick Goble and attached it to the side wall lining of our engine hole. Can’t recall how much we paid but it wouldn’t have been a fortune. Maybe he still has one knocking around? I have his numbers. Great bloke!
  10. Phil formulated Grand Union Pale Blue, which should be available from Craftmaster. It used to be available from Atex paints in Brierley Hill but they no longer manufacture paints in small quantities. Bear in mind that the original blue will have faded, this might not sit too well with the new paint. I guess my lettering is a bit faded by now, too!
  11. Tunnel bands is a modern term for them. Since the 60s, I’ve always known them as counter bands. I don’t think the waterways press help in this respect, I’ve seen what I know as a stop beam referred to as a “ boatman’s beam” , likewise a cabin stool called a “ boatman’s stool”. Side doors called swan or duck hatches make me wince….
  12. Indeed. I have one surviving older relative, my uncle who married dad’s youngest sister. We celebrated his 92nd birthday last summer. Back in early January, I had a call from my cousin, his daughter. After several falls, he had been hospitalised…..weeks on, he has lost the use of both arms, back home in a hospital bed with carers 4 times a day. After a long life of public service, from scouting, local politics, school governor and local law, it is heartbreaking to see a physical shell housing a still active mind. Awful.
  13. Back in the 70s as an avid folkie, I used to help out at a local music shop, Modern Music in Dudley. The owners, former professional musicians, set up the shop not only to sell stuff but also to offer repair services to touring musicians, based on their own working experiences. Jack, one of the owners, was a superb jazz guitarist and would sometimes leave the rear office to shoo off the time wasters in the shop, playing lots of notes but little music, in his opinion. He retired many years ago and I bumped into him shortly afterwards in our local shopping centre. We chatted for a while and then he admonished “ Dave, don’t get old” ” Why, Jack?” ” Well” he added….” All the bits that used to work don’t any more. And the ones that are left…hurt! “ I now know only too well the wisdom of his words.
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