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Boy dies after attempt to jump lock goes wrong

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16 minutes ago, cougie said:

Oh yes. Common sense is exclusive to the older generation. And each generation talks down the next generation. 

Sad to say that the youth of today are particularly dense and think the world is some computer game in which no harm can come to them....as this case proves life can bite you on the arse 

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10 minutes ago, frangar said:

Sad to say that the youth of today are particularly dense and think the world is some computer game in which no harm can come to them....as this case proves life can bite you on the arse 

If it's any consolation, substitute drinking for computer and they seem to feel exactly the same way about boomers.

 

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5 hours ago, BWM said:

Which end of the lock at Denham?

The 'bottom gate' is at the bottom end   😀

 

Tam

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1 hour ago, frangar said:

Sad to say that the youth of today are particularly dense and think the world is some computer game in which no harm can come to them....as this case proves life can bite you on the arse 

I think that the 'youth of today' are a lot more aware of the big issues which face them, perhaps due to social media.

 

Unfortunately I agree with Frangar that many of them seem oblivious to actual immediate risks. I tried to reason with two lads doing something physically stupid (doesn't matter what or where) and their whole attitude was "you can't tell us what to do".

 

I absolutely agree with them, I can't, but their whole focus was on my interference not on the inherent danger to themselves.

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OH FFS.

 

I'm all for this being an open forum but child mortality was higher in 'the good old days'. A relative of mine died in what were then tragic, and what would possibly now be 'child endangerment/neglect' waterway circumstances.

 

By all means be offensive, and upset the (hypothetically reading) grieving parents. But at least be statstically correct!

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1 hour ago, TheMenagerieAfloat said:

OH FFS.

 

I'm all for this being an open forum but child mortality was higher in 'the good old days'. A relative of mine died in what were then tragic, and what would possibly now be 'child endangerment/neglect' waterway circumstances.

 

By all means be offensive, and upset the (hypothetically reading) grieving parents. But at least be statstically correct!

Of course it was, so was adult mortality. It was mainly down to poorer public health and after that, to poorer access to good medicine.

 

The "grieving parents" of today probably have not lost half their children in their first year of life and they have been conditioned to believe that stupidity isn't actually dangerous. Their kids have a "right to life" no matter the idiocy of their actions.

 

 

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My husband, born 1962, has regaled us with many stories of the ridiculous and dangerous things he did as a boy. A country boy he tested out an aerial roadway that spectacularly gave way as soon as he put his weight on it - dropped on his arse and was lucky not to be paralysed. The dynamite he and his brothers made up. The hay barn where they dared each other to jump from ridiculous heights. They survived by luck, not judgement.

Nothing new, especially if showing off in front of girls is concerned. That's when they get REALLY silly!

 

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Graded exposure to risk by being outside messing, about taught some risk assessment skills. Falling off your scooter/ bike meant you learned it hurt, so you avoided it. Falling off ladders onto the gym floor playing british bulldog meant more pain.

I suspect  indoor activity health and safety and helicopter parenting means poor learning skills.

Sad to learn the hardest way for the family.

 

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1 hour ago, roland elsdon said:

Graded exposure to risk by being outside messing, about taught some risk assessment skills. Falling off your scooter/ bike meant you learned it hurt, so you avoided it. Falling off ladders onto the gym floor playing british bulldog meant more pain.

I suspect  indoor activity health and safety and helicopter parenting means poor learning skills.

Sad to learn the hardest way for the family.

 

Indeed....now you just buy an extra life in your digital worlds.....

8 hours ago, Cheshire cat said:

It's on the local news. Residents want the locks making safer!

That’s a shocker...maybe educating their kids might be a start....

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1 hour ago, frangar said:

Indeed....now you just buy an extra life in your digital worlds.....

That’s a shocker...maybe educating their kids might be a start....

Blame the parents, kids start out as a blank canvas.

We all did daft things as kids but those that survived had a sense of danger instilled by parents and were allowed to take calculated risks. That's how we learnt to deal with the world.

Now kids learn from games on screens and think that they can just call up an extra life.

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Here we go: declining rates of accidental death in children since the 70s

 

It is simply untrue to say there used to be fewer accidental deaths of children when they had less supervision/more access to risk taking and so forth. 

 

There are plenty of studies which show a high correlation (and at least some causality) with poverty, parental education levels and so forth.

Edited by TheMenagerieAfloat

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6 hours ago, Ange said:

The hay barn where they dared each other to jump from ridiculous heights.

 

I used to do that. Or I did until I broke two bones in my wrist as well as my elbow. That arm still gives me problems 50 years later. So I stopped jumping off stacks of bales and graduated onto setting fire to petrol while pouring it from a can and, later, to touching the bar of an electric fire to see if it was heating up. I don't think kids today do anything much more stupid than I did back in the day.

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It happens. There's nothing to be done about it. Young people are adventurous, always have been always will be and the human race would be diminished if it were not so. Unfortunately there is a casualty rate goes with that. Look at the number of adults winched off of boats, cliff faces, hillsides. Do people like Ranulph Fiennes (spelling?) Really need to put themselves at risk for no good reason but the ability to claim "first"? Yet he and his ilk are lauded. Without "idiot" kids no one would grow up to be Jacques Cousteau or Yuri Gagarin.

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6 hours ago, Ange said:

My husband, born 1962, has regaled us with many stories of the ridiculous and dangerous things he did as a boy. A country boy he tested out an aerial roadway that spectacularly gave way as soon as he put his weight on it - dropped on his arse and was lucky not to be paralysed. The dynamite he and his brothers made up. The hay barn where they dared each other to jump from ridiculous heights. They survived by luck, not judgement.

Nothing new, especially if showing off in front of girls is concerned. That's when they get REALLY silly!

 

I agree, me and my friends did extremely dangerous things as youngsters. I survived by luck but lost two friends.

:(

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1 hour ago, TheMenagerieAfloat said:

Here we go: declining rates of accidental death in children since the 70s

 

It is simply untrue to say there used to be fewer accidental deaths of children when they had less supervision/more access to risk taking and so forth. 

 

There are plenty of studies which show a high correlation (and at least some causality) with poverty, parental education levels and so forth.

Quite so, less open  fires, car seats in cars, swimming pool fences. These are passive safety devices.

However if you are uneducated in risk assessment  decisions , by denial of access to risk assessing situations, you are likely to make a bad decision when it counts.

This is exactly why the driving test now involves simulated events in a simulator.

it improves decision making skills, which with the reduction in walking and cycling have not been honed early.

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3 hours ago, Proper Charlie said:

I used to do that. Or I did until I broke two bones in my wrist as well as my elbow. That arm still gives me problems 50 years later. So I stopped jumping off stacks of bales and graduated onto setting fire to petrol while pouring it from a can and, later, to touching the bar of an electric fire to see if it was heating up. I don't think kids today do anything much more stupid than I did back in the day.

Maybe your name was enough of a warning to everyone else to keep an eye out for you?

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14 hours ago, frahkn said:

Unfortunately I agree with Frangar that many of them seem oblivious to actual immediate risks.

According to a lady on Radio 4 recently, who appeared to be an expert on such things, the human brain isn't fully developed until the age of 25. One of the last things to develop is the ability to forsee the consequences of our actions. 

 

Lower the voting age to 16 anyone?

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7 minutes ago, Sea Dog said:

According to a lady on Radio 4 recently, who appeared to be an expert on such things, the human brain isn't fully developed until the age of 25. One of the last things to develop is the ability to forsee the consequences of our actions. 

 

Lower the voting age to 16 anyone?

Does beg the question, how old was the Radio 4 lady?

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Just now, Boater Sam said:

Does beg the question, how old was the Radio 4 lady?

As a gentleman, I wouldn't deign to ask such a question - particularly of lady on the wireless: it would be akin to shouting at the telly.

 

She did sound mature enough to be a proper expert if that helps you to judge her credibility... 

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15 hours ago, Tam & Di said:

The 'bottom gate' is at the bottom end   😀

 

Tam

Doh! Missed that. 

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40 minutes ago, Sea Dog said:

According to a lady on Radio 4 recently, who appeared to be an expert on such things, the human brain isn't fully developed until the age of 25. One of the last things to develop is the ability to forsee the consequences of our actions. 

 

Lower the voting age to 16 anyone?

Personally I think there are a good number who vote now who haven't foreseen the consequences of their actions.

 

So would you agree with raising voting age to 25?  If we are looking at things like foreseeing the consequences of their actions we might have to raise the age for being in the military, police, driving, getting married, giving consent etc.

 

It always strikes me as odd that you are considered old enough to consent to sex at 16 but not old enough to vote.   There is a very real noticeable consequence possible from sex but from voting, not so great a consequence as the thousands over 25 would water down the 16 year olds votes. 

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