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Showing content with the highest reputation on 07/09/20 in all areas

  1. This - and I'm a long-time cycle commuter. The petition calls the towpath a 'safe, fast route'; if anyone is riding fast down a towpath, they need chucking off it. Towpaths are too narrow for riding fast.
    3 points
  2. Nothing is the answer because CRT would just use the extra money to invest in building instead of their core business which is navigations. You clearly have never dealt with them my mate does as his Bar is rented from them they are useless, thieving, lying wasteful T*****s I when I converted my boat from diesel to electric had nearly 6 months of hassle before I got the license this is the norm for them! The phone for Tinsley flight has broken and has been for months its not been replaced why? because it means they dont have to fix or allow use of the flight! This stuff is constant they arnt all like my comments but a lot are, now I really have done I asked some boaters about your ideas and they are still rolling around on the floor laughing, my suggestion is buy a boat and then discover how expensive it is before having silly ideas
    3 points
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  6. Staged payments with ownership of vessel at each stage paid for needs to be in contract......and contract needs to be legally sound. Colecraft have survived more than one crash, Tyler wilson similar.
    2 points
  7. Differential licence pricing was put forward by British Waterways back in 2006 following a ruling by the waterways ombudsman that shared ownership boats were being treated unfairly being charged almost 2.5 times the fee paid by other private boaters. The consultation failed to gain boater support and so the idea was not implemented. I suggest you read up on the many consultations that have taken place over the last 20 years.
    2 points
  8. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  9. 15mm, 22mm and some imperial sizes?
    2 points
  10. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  11. But as a timber Ash is very strong, and perhaps more importantly very flexible and shock resistant, which is why it is used for things like hammer, axe, spade, and chisel handles, it is also used for sports equipment like hockey sticks, baseball bats, rowing oars, archery bows, etc.
    2 points
  12. Seriously, you can find outliers for anything. Making a safe gas installation is a lot easier than a full electrical system. That fitter neglected to do one thing; test the gas system with pipes cold. This is much easier to do on a boat (if you use bubble testers) than in household installations. Manometers are really not great. I don't want to encourage anyone who has limited mechanical skill from working on a gas system (getting mechanical joints tight enough but not too tight requires some feeling for the use of spanners). However I'm tired of the demonization of gas. The same people who act terrified of gas are quite happy to get work done on their car by an apprentice who is paid £3.50 ph; then get in that car and drive at 70mph on the motorway. Car brakes, steering, etc are a lot more complicated than a boat gas system!
    2 points
  13. Mine is a Mastervolt, its so good I have never got round to putting it into power save mode
    2 points
  14. Mains equipment every time. Ensure u have a good quality inverter that uses very little power when switched on and sleeping. Some are terrible such as Stirling which use far too much power. Master volt are very good just for one. Mains equipment is humungously cheaper to buy and vastly more choice at the drop of a hat. Mains uses a very little more than 12 volt but that is far outweighed by other factors.
    2 points
  15. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  16. Yes U570 when it was captured and became HMS GRAPH. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Graph Also a couple surrendered in the Thames https://www.britishpathe.com/video/VLVA55TW3CHXVGGJE6UJI059JG0H5-U-BOAT-SURRENDERS-IN-THE-THAMES/query/U+776 WW I as well: https://historyhouse.co.uk/articles/uboats_in_british_ports.html U570 - HMS Graph. Gunther Prien also entered Scapa Flow and sank The Royal Oak.
    2 points
  17. https://shop.canalrivertrust.org.uk/ Canal & River Trust Key £7 or https://www.midlandchandlers.co.uk/products/bwb-sanitary-keys-ag-023 £5.90 DO NOT buy from eBay, i bought one in the past and so far it has worked in one out of about ten locks tried, the key is just too thick for most of the CRT locks. I ended up buying two or three direct from CRT so i know they'll work and the cash has gone direct to where it matters* *board meeting biscuits and director's new car
    2 points
  18. Often people don't need a financial incentive. Just the desire to help keep our canals going or to learn new skills and get some fresh air may be enough. I'm sure many live aboards wouid be happy to act like lengthsmen in return for being allowed to moor in the same place. All year round CC'ers are in a good position to report issues and do basic repairs. I wouln't want anything financial in return.
    2 points
  19. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  20. Let me just check that I've understood the argument against CaRT increasing the annual license fee to pay for much-needed canal maintenance... -- CaRT doesn't spend enough on canal maintenance and hasn't for many years -- this is causing the system to deteriorate and we don't want this to continue (or get worse) -- we like paying a tiny amount to cruise/live on the canals just like we have for many years, it's a really cheap way to live innit -- we don't want to pay more 'cos it's not fair and some people couldn't afford it (and/or don't want to / can't ask welfare to pay) -- so somebody else (e.g. walkers, cyclists, Joe Public) should cough up, not us, even though we get by far the biggest benefit from the canals Is that right? Really? Boat license fees are currently in the region of £1000 which is £20 a week. To increase the overall CRT budget by 25% (£50M) -- probably what is needed make a big enough difference to fix the problem -- it would need to increase to about £2500 which is £50 a week. For what this gets you and compared to the other costs of buying/running a boat -- and certainly compared to the costs of living on land -- this is an increase from ludicrously cheap to very cheap... CaRT wouldn't be able to make such a big change overnight anyway because they don't have the maintenance staff or equipment to suddenly use up another £50M a year, this would have to be built up over maybe 5 years -- and it would be better value to do this in-house instead of subcontracting it, that way money isn't creamed off to service company shareholders and CaRT build up a skilled workforce who maybe even care about the canals a bit. So the fee might go up by about £300 a year for 5 years, by which time we could have a properly maintained canal system that works in the long term. This increase is gradual enough that it wouldn't immediately throw people out onto the street, and if it makes them change their lifestyle it gives enough time to do it. Could anybody who really loves the canals -- presumably, most people on this forum -- honestly object to this? ?
    2 points
  21. Ye I guessed that but it's freshly painted and has a bond so should be ok for the sikaflex
    1 point
  22. They do a few products that would do it. Including a 100% waterproof contact adhesive. That would be my choice.
    1 point
  23. They're close enough together that you're forgiven.
    1 point
  24. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  25. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  26. 14 years and still going, but then it is a 48V 24 cell traction bank. 2 x 3000va Victron inverters, on 24/7. All domestic 230V equipment apart from pumps and some led lights and fans. But...... 5Kw 48V dc diesel gen to keep it all going when not on shore power. Runs for a couple of hours every day or two depending on usage. System not very tolerant of neglect, so would not recommend if not live aboard. If you want to have all the functionallity of a house afloat, this is the sort of (expensive) kit required. For just camping aboard, go low voltage + small inverter and expect to wear out leisure batteries every few years.
    1 point
  27. Sorry to drag this off topic but not completely, decay resistance is as much structural as a product of the living processes in the tree, practically a tree is a thin smear of living cells surrounding a functionally dead core.
    1 point
  28. 1 point
  29. Shot blast and powdercoat. I had 2 cast iron park bench frames done about 8 years ago. They are outside in all weathers and still perfect. Cost about 20 quid for cash if I remember correctly.
    1 point
  30. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  31. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  32. Just posted on the BCNS Facebook page: https://player.bfi.org.uk/free/film/watch-rope-maker-1976-online?fbclid=IwAR0QgydcUImVff3Tx9L7zLBhrd2XRANCTvO5YWERhoBwtqk9q8FDv415iwI Alf was a well known figure on the BCN in the '70's and '80's.
    1 point
  33. Neither will a means tested increase No one here has shot down any sensible suggestion Yawn!
    1 point
  34. I would go for 240AC for nearly everything (not water pumps, as there are good, compact DC pumps). Advantages: Cheap replacements sourceable nearly anywhere. Better quality for a lot of fittings (12v DC fittings are often poundshop quality, particularly lighting). No worries about voltage drop over long cable runs. No worries about voltage fluctuations blowing equipment (12V Battery DC voltage can vary by 3V)
    1 point
  35. You won't get a straight answer but I have one boat with 12 V and one with 230 V. When the 12 V one dies (which it shows no sign of doing although 25 years old) it will be replaced with a 230 V one. A decent inverter plus mains fridge is generally cheaper than a low voltage fridge. If cost is a key factor, there's not that much difference in energy consumption between A+ and A++ fridges but lots of £££. It is worth checking what ambient temperature a mains fridge is designed for, there are several bands. Our mains fridge is on a boat in France and only used in warmer months, and was chosen for higher temperature ratings. Most, but not all, fridges have a wide band of suitability nowadays. The key parameter is the quiescent current consumption of the invertor. Some go into "sleep" mode if there is no power demand, and it is said that they may be reluctant to start a fridge or low power lighting. I can't comment further, others doubtless will. An invertor for a fridge needs to be rated at several times the running power to cope with starting transients. We run a small domestic fridge (about 70 W measured power consumption when the compressor is running) off a 1 kW continuous rated invertor with no problems, and could probably go lower.
    1 point
  36. 240v every time. BUT - make sure that you have the electrical generating capacity to support a 'floating flat'. Unlike a house where you just 'click a switch' and the electricity is available, YOU are now the electric generating company, the electric storage company and the electric distribution company. You can only use what you have 'made'. Understanding and living with 'self supplied' electricity is the hardest aspect for new boaters to come to grips with.
    1 point
  37. I and others have already made that point. Tell it to Dora. I’m of the view that there are many forms of tunnel - and tunnelling techniques - and that there isn’t an absolute single definition between what constitutes a culvert, bridge, tunnel or viaduct. As a result I have concluded that what it’s custodian calls it is good enough for me, and I have pointed out why it matters to them. JP
    1 point
  38. I assume you mean cost of verification not enforcement? (enforcement is exactly the same as now i.e. have you got a license?) From your POV there's no point ever having any progressive tax system because it will always be fiddled, so the only solution is to charge everyone the same so the poor can't afford it and the rich laugh it off. I can't believe that you think that's a better solution... ? Verification of income/tax/expenditure is already done by banks, mortgage lenders, HMRC and others -- HMRC is the obvious channel since they already deal with income. It depends on how the numbers are crunched and whose particular pot the money goes in and out of; one option would be to charge everyone the highest fee (money goes direct to CaRT) and then poorer people apply for a rebate through some other channel that's already set up to do this (HMRC?) who then cross-charge this in bulk so CaRT doesn't know who pays what. The other option would be to tell CaRT how much to charge in the first place, but there could be data protection issues with this since they'd have to know about people's financial circumstances -- HMRC already knows about this. None of this is difficult, it's exactly what is already done with other tax reliefs and repayments, and the system is already set up to deal with it. It just needs the will to make it happen -- and the general agreement from boaters that a progressive license system (the rich pay more to keep the system going) is acceptable, not mass protests by people who don't see why they should pay more than they're been used to doing, even though they can afford it and it's necessary. I have a suspicion that "could pay but don't want to" protests from the selfish might derail this... ?
    1 point
  39. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  40. WE HAVE NOW RETIRED FROM ALL BOAT MOVING ACTIVITIES. THANK YOU TO ALL CUSTOMERS & FRIENDS. See you around the Inland waterways, enjoying retirement on-board our own nb. Always happy to mentor new boaters looking to research, 0r buy a first narrowboat. WE DO NOT RUN A BUSINESS & DO NOT CHARGE FOR SHARING OUR 43 years boating experience. Everything we discuss with you online is 100% confidential. Contact us by email (apaws4chat@gmail.com) Linda & Don
    1 point
  41. Restoring canals (e.g Wendover arm, Monty etc) are major projects and are being done mainly using volunteers. Maintenence of an existing canal probably isn't much harder.
    1 point
  42. Some years ago with our first boat a Chrighton narrow 32ft cruiser we exited onto the Trent from Keadby taking it steady as it was our first time on the Trent a Gin palace shot past us digging a big hole in the water and causing us to bob and sway about violently depite turning accross their wake. Not very impressed we arrived at Torksey just in time to see him go through the lock. on our way to Lincon we saw them havinf a BBQ at Saxilby going past at low revs I made a loud remark about hurry up merchants causing fear and inconvieiance to other craft on the river. Some time later I had a nice letter from him saying he was very sorry and as a member of the Stawbury island boat club they tried to be considerate of other boaters.
    1 point
  43. I think you have melted his brain. A terrible thing is cognitive dissonance. I read the words you posted and followed it quite well. I'd rather the fees didn't get too steep, but they would have to go up quite a lot before I stopped paying them. If nothing else, the prices of secondhand boats would probably come down quite a bit, attracting more people onto the water who would accept the higher ongoing costs.
    1 point
  44. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  45. The manual shows that there should be one (it is also an anode, and erodes away), so maybe whoever replaced the anodes forgot / didn't know about that one. Whilst you are 'out' get on put on, it helps to protect the leg.
    1 point
  46. The cyclists on the towpath where I am don't seem to treat it as a gentle way to get around. At "rush hour", (about 5 or 6 hours a day), it's like Silverstone on British Grand Prix day, and anyone other than cyclists take their life in their hands if they venture onto it at these times. It would be a bonus for almost everyone if cyclists were banished to the proper roads forever, never mind 4 or 5 months!! Just my Humble Opinion, but I dont think I'm alone in it.
    1 point
  47. What do you base this on? If boaters license fees are not paying for the product (i.e. well maintained, navigable canals) then clearly boaters aren't paying enough? Why should anglers, volunteers and general taxpayers be subsidising our navigation? If there was a massive locust swarm that came and ate half the wheat in the world and the bread price doubled, people say "oh, but we're paying too much for bread". But surely the price of the production of the bread needs to be reflected in the cost of the bread, otherwise why would anyone sell bread? As it stands it seems that we're benefiting from the investment made by the freight industry over 100 years ago, and that this has a time limit unless further investment is made - and the people who benefit from this are boaters. Anglers don't need deep water, people walking along the towpath don't need to have boats there (if anything they're competing for the space). I think it's fair to ask what would it cost for boaters to pay their way - and if it's genuinely too much for us to afford then to ask whether boaters navigating is enough of a public good that the taxpayer should cover it. Alan said "100's of millions needs spending". So can we say 200 million over the next 20 years? That's 10 million per year. According to CaRT website there are about 34 000 canal boats in the UK. 300 GBP extra per boat per year would raise that number. Why shouldn't boaters pay it? And if that's too much then perhaps CaRT does need to consider closing some of the canals so that we can afford to maintain the remainder. Let's be practical about this - not idealistic. Perhaps the truth of the matter is somewhere between "I won't pay more nor have any hand in helping - the canals will be closed in our lifetime" and "boaters can pay 1000s more and volunteer hard and the waterways will stay 100% open". I for one hope there is enough of a core following of boating that at least some of the major waterways (e.g. Grand Union) will survive pretty much forever.
    1 point
  48. Nothings being wasted - at 95% the batteries are taking a very small current that one controller is quite capable of providing all on its own. Yes, and yes. Otherwise the other controller wouldn't have dropped out
    1 point
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