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doratheexplorer

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doratheexplorer last won the day on September 29 2020

doratheexplorer had the most liked content!

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  • Boat Name
    Bright Star
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    Canal

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  1. You are right about permitted development height limits, and a narrowboat from hull to roof would be less than this. However, it's not quite that simple: 1. Some properties don't have permitted development rights. Especially those built within the last 30 years or so. You might want to check. 2. This boat/office would be an outbuilding. To be classed as permitted development, an outbuilding would need to be considered to be 'reasonably required'. This means that you may have to demonstrate that you are unable to provide office space within your existing house. I'd cont
  2. By "composting loo", I think she means she used to have 2 buckets.
  3. The main thing I can't get my head around, is why did she need to quit her job when she bought a boat? If she was earning £90k a year, she could have bought the boat, gone part time to half her hours and had the best of both worlds. None of it makes a shred of sense.
  4. https://www.thesun.co.uk/fabulous/13732300/quit-lawyer-job-live-boat-wee-bucket-shower/#comments
  5. I have the exact same solution on mine. It's been through at least one BSS with the switch fitted.
  6. As others have said, the issue is far more likely to be inadequate engine cooling than inadequate engine power. What are the cooling set ups of these boats? If skin tanks, then how big are those tanks? Is there any other way of dumping excess engine heat if needed? For example, if I needed to I could run the central heating pump to use the radiators as extra heat sinks. I've never had to do that though.
  7. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  8. Simple answer is probably yes. Many similar narrowboats do it every year. Refurbished or not, a 1.5 BMC will have probably lost more horses over the years than the Beta.
  9. We can eat plants all we want, but the carbon will eventually find its way back into the environment, much of it in the form of CO2. In the end, it's roughly carbon neutral though, much like burning biodiesel. The big menace has always been burning fossil fuels since takes locked up carbon and puts it in the atmosphere. If we stop burning coal and oil (and raise fewer cows), we can meet our emissions targets such that emissions remain within the Earth's feedback loops (unless we've already crossed certain thresholds). Burning biodiesel is part of that solution, so lets not demonise it.
  10. My thinking isn't at all what you're saying, I was simply pointing out the flaw in what you said. It's obvious that sequestering atmospheric carbon is a useful aim, but if we don't use those soybeans for biodiesel, then what else should we be doing with them (or anything else we grow)? There's not much evidence that the more traditional use of crops (eating them) is any more helpful in reducing overall levels of atmospheric carbon. Certainly using those crops for animal fodder is probably an even worse idea than burning them, since methane is arguably even worse than CO2 for dri
  11. Surely the whole cycle of biodiesel is not far off carbon neutral? Burning creates CO2 but presumably in similar quantiies to the CO2 absorbed by growing the crops in the first place. So the only net increase would be due to processing. Am I wrong?
  12. In some cases, too much nitrogen at the expense of other nutrients can be detrimental to the crop.
  13. I don't doubt it. But they're doing that because it's good business to sell their boats as quickly as possible. Some brokers don't get this. But no broker is going to say "I don't really have what you're looking for, but there's a broker up the road who does"
  14. This isn't a bad idea. Ultimately a broker acts on behalf of the seller. He gets his commission by selling as many boats as possible at the highest possible price. It's also true that many first time buyers are shockingly green when making their first purchase and can frequently dump tens of thousands of pounds on a lemon. If they're slightly more sensible, they'll get a survey, but that only really helps after they've selected a boat. Someone knowledgable who can help them make a selection could be a valuable thing.
  15. https://www.forbes.com/sites/erikaandersen/2012/03/23/true-fact-the-lack-of-pirates-is-causing-global-warming/?sh=23a3dc4a3a67
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