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Rcr helped us and we will never forget how good knowledgeable they are


Glynda joyce

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Only had one bad experience with RCR early on before I realised I could do engines. He was just a kid though, so I forgave that. Other than this, all good. I Trust them more than I do the independent call out guys.

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1 hour ago, Neil2 said:

Unless the tube is within a sealed compartment there's every chance a perforated tube could cause a nb to sink.  

I believe it has happened.

If you want to protect against it you need to properly paint both the outside and the inside of the tube. The inside can only be done with the boat out of the water. The outside can in theory be done afloat, but the front and bottom faces of the tube are all but inaccessible in the bottom of the bows on many boats, so probably don't get properly painted.

Edited by David Mack
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38 minutes ago, Loddon said:

Why would anybody design a BT system where the tube wasn't in a "sealed" compartment up to deck level?

Gas lockers are like that so why not BT?

 

Well it seems like a good idea but it sounds as though the OP's boat wasn't designed like that, otherwise it wouldn't be "life threatening".  

 

I've certainly seen at least one installation where the tube was buried away right down in the bilge with no obvious access to it.  

 

I guess having a gas locker type compartment is seen as a waste of space on the modern narrowboat.  

 

Incidentally I've noticed a couple of boats for sale recently - older boats - where the bowthruster tube has been sealed from the outside.

 

 

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Any mention of RCR always produces a catalogue of responses such as this one. As an emergency rescue service, they operate in exactly the same way as auto rescue services eg AA,RAC, & Green Flag. much of the problem that RCR seem to face stems from the fact that owners do not have a satisfactory service regime which would eliminate many of the problems they are called to. Also, lots of owners don't carry basic spares such as filters drive belts or Morse cables, but rely on the engineer to bail them out.

I have Bronze membership, but carry a good supply of basic spares and tools so that in the event of minor troubles, I don't have to wait for an indeterminate length of time for an engineer, but if disaster strikes, I need only make one call and not take pot luck on an independent that I do not know. If RCR send out such an individual, then at least I have some recourse. Also, Bronze gives me insurance cover for items up to £1000. If I have one big claim in 10 years, then membership has paid for itself. 

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7 hours ago, Arthur Marshall said:

I've been a member for years now. I've had one callout when the bloke just shrugged and walked away, another who did his best but failed to sort a broken fuel pipe, one who replaced a bust starter, another who sorted out a gearbox problem in half an hour. On top of that, they've contributed £2000 to gearbox repairs and their service engineer had a fallout with the owner of my mooring site which got RCR banned from the farm and for which they never apologised.

So a mixed bunch, but as a person of a certain age and inflexibility with no expertise in engines, I wouldn't be without them as a safety net. When disaster strikes, panic sets in and an expert on the end of a phone call is very reassuring. And to know they'll always get you to a boatyard if necessary is also handy.

And to slag off a new poster, who in good faith put a useful report on here,  as some members have done, is a disgrace and they should be ashamed of themselves. Sadly, it's typical of some, but luckily not the majority.

 

Will they though? When I queried that on my first call out, (the oil warning light coming on) the impression given by the guy who turned up was that there is a false sense of security on that one. Their terms and conditions state,"....If the vessel cannot be repaired at the scene of the Breakdown within a reasonable time at your request, we will tow the vessel safely to a marina (within a maximum of 2 hours cruising), or – failing that – tow the vessel to a safe haven (advice and locations will be given)....." that 2 hours includes the time it takes them to get a tow boat to you, so you are looking at a maximum distance from a marina of 3 miles (if they can tow you at 3mph), but probably a lot less than that. It was realising that which made my mind up to just call out a local marine engineer as and when needed and not bother with RCR. With 8 cruising seasons on the canals and only 1 as a RCR member that equates to about £1,000 that I haven't spent on membership (based on Bronze Level) that would buy me a 3 day's labour from a Marine Engineer.

 

I would say that for anyone with no idea of engines they are probably a good idea, but they are not the same as Green Flag/AA/RAC on the roads.

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I looked into getting RCR but decided I could either do, or would learn to do, the basics they covered. 

This has paid off so far. In 10 years I’ve paid £50 for help. 
Otherwise I’ve manage to sort things which would not have been covered by RCR. 
 

Now if RCR offered to get me home, like me roadside recovery does if they can’t fix the problem on site, then I might be tempted. 

 

 

Edited by Goliath
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1 hour ago, StephenA said:

 

Yes, I'm a seriously sad, bitter and twisted person.


Are you the one who does that canal planner ?

 

Hats off to you matey !

 

from one seriously sad, bitter and twisted person to another 

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1 hour ago, Wanderer Vagabond said:

Will they though? When I queried that on my first call out, (the oil warning light coming on) the impression given by the guy who turned up was that there is a false sense of security on that one. Their terms and conditions state,"....If the vessel cannot be repaired at the scene of the Breakdown within a reasonable time at your request, we will tow the vessel safely to a marina (within a maximum of 2 hours cruising), or – failing that – tow the vessel to a safe haven (advice and locations will be given)....." that 2 hours includes the time it takes them to get a tow boat to you, so you are looking at a maximum distance from a marina of 3 miles (if they can tow you at 3mph), but probably a lot less than that. It was realising that which made my mind up to just call out a local marine engineer as and when needed and not bother with RCR. With 8 cruising seasons on the canals and only 1 as a RCR member that equates to about £1,000 that I haven't spent on membership (based on Bronze Level) that would buy me a 3 day's labour from a Marine Engineer.

 

I would say that for anyone with no idea of engines they are probably a good idea, but they are not the same as Green Flag/AA/RAC on the roads.

What they told me when the gearbox died was that they'd happily tow me home (probably about four hours plus Bosley locks) but they'd charge me for over 2 hours, and that would come out of the money they'd pay towards the gearbox. So I'd be better off making my own way home and keeping the whole of the £1000 for the rebuild. Which is what I did - got a tow to Bosley from a friendly boater, pulled it through myself and hitched a lift from a hire boat home.

Luckily, they used my favourite engineer as a consultant, so they usually sent him anyway, as none of their usual guys know anything about Listers. I reckon the two grand I've had from them, plus a new starter and the gearbox problem sorting, keeps me ahead even if I never need them again.

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17 minutes ago, Goliath said:


Are you the one who does that canal planner ?

 

Hats off to you matey !

 

from one seriously sad, bitter and twisted person to another 

 

Half of it - all the bits hanging off the side and the maps and all the server config and support.

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3 hours ago, Arthur Marshall said:

What they told me when the gearbox died was that they'd happily tow me home (probably about four hours plus Bosley locks) but they'd charge me for over 2 hours, and that would come out of the money they'd pay towards the gearbox. So I'd be better off making my own way home and keeping the whole of the £1000 for the rebuild. Which is what I did - got a tow to Bosley from a friendly boater, pulled it through myself and hitched a lift from a hire boat home.

Luckily, they used my favourite engineer as a consultant, so they usually sent him anyway, as none of their usual guys know anything about Listers. I reckon the two grand I've had from them, plus a new starter and the gearbox problem sorting, keeps me ahead even if I never need them again.

I would be genuinely interested in just how many times they actually tow anyone anywhere (even though it is suggested in their T's & C's that they will). If your tow would have been 4 hours, and assuming they sourced the tow boat from your destination (otherwise they'd have to charge you for returning it somewhere else) that would work out at something like 8 hours recovery time (I would guess that your 'free' two hours would be more than used up in Bosley Locks). At the usual rate for such workers of £45 per hour that would be something like £360.

 

Compared to what I haven't had to spend on RCR membership (circa £1000) I'm also probably well ahead. I've replaced the water pump (that I foolishly caused to fail by overtightening the drive belt), replaced the engine isolator switch and changed about 3 alternators, only one of which RCR would cover since the one that fails most is the domestic alternator. So 3 alternators (about £270) an engine isolator switch (can't remember for sure, but somewhere about £20) and a water pump which I think was about £120 including carriage)  so circa £400 in total all done with my own labour so no labour charges. Oh, and I've just remembered the recent £45 to Ed Shiers for stopping my slipping alternator drive belt, but once again that probably wouldn't have been covered by RCR since it was maintenance not breakdown.

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12 hours ago, ditchcrawler said:

Well I guess that's another new member well pissed off because some didn't like their first posting. I am surprised anyone joins if they lurk a bit first and see how new members get treated

I wonder if we could have some equivalent of an 'L' plate for new members, pinned to their first few posts, so old timers are reminded to cut them some slack.

A new member may well be totally unaware of just how much of a bear pit this forum can be.

 

I still can't wrap my head around why anyone would have a problem with a new member posting about a good experience from a canal business.  We need more positivity on here.

 

I note those members have not apologised.

9 hours ago, Wanderer Vagabond said:

I would be genuinely interested in just how many times they actually tow anyone anywhere (even though it is suggested in their T's & C's that they will). If your tow would have been 4 hours, and assuming they sourced the tow boat from your destination (otherwise they'd have to charge you for returning it somewhere else) that would work out at something like 8 hours recovery time (I would guess that your 'free' two hours would be more than used up in Bosley Locks). At the usual rate for such workers of £45 per hour that would be something like £360.

 

 

You could buy a used outboard and get yourself home with that for less than that.

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9 hours ago, Wanderer Vagabond said:

I would be genuinely interested in just how many times they actually tow anyone anywhere (even though it is suggested in their T's & C's that they will). If your tow would have been 4 hours, and assuming they sourced the tow boat from your destination (otherwise they'd have to charge you for returning it somewhere else) that would work out at something like 8 hours recovery time (I would guess that your 'free' two hours would be more than used up in Bosley Locks). At the usual rate for such workers of £45 per hour that would be something like £360.

 

Compared to what I haven't had to spend on RCR membership (circa £1000) I'm also probably well ahead. I've replaced the water pump (that I foolishly caused to fail by overtightening the drive belt), replaced the engine isolator switch and changed about 3 alternators, only one of which RCR would cover since the one that fails most is the domestic alternator. So 3 alternators (about £270) an engine isolator switch (can't remember for sure, but somewhere about £20) and a water pump which I think was about £120 including carriage)  so circa £400 in total all done with my own labour so no labour charges. Oh, and I've just remembered the recent £45 to Ed Shiers for stopping my slipping alternator drive belt, but once again that probably wouldn't have been covered by RCR since it was maintenance not breakdown.

Your figure for the tow was, I think,  more or less what their bloke told me. But there are still odd occasions when it could be useful, although there are usually boats passing that will tow you somewhere if you ask.

For those of us with no engineering knowledge and who are intrinsically cack-handed, having an engineer always available is worth the money. If you are capable of doing your own maintenance, it probably isn't. I presume, like any insurer, they make their money from those who pay but never use them.

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12 minutes ago, doratheexplorer said:

I wonder if we could have some equivalent of an 'L' plate for new members, pinned to their first few posts, so old timers are reminded to cut them some slack.

A new member may well be totally unaware of just how much of a bear pit this forum can be.

 

I still can't wrap my head around why anyone would have a problem with a new member posting about a good experience from a canal business.  We need more positivity on here.

 

I note those members have not apologised.

All social media is like that. Some only come on to sneer or pick a fight. There's enough positivity to keep the newbies here though - I'm seeing a lot of names I don't recognise lately, and they can't all be once banned Thunderboaters under alternative identities.

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1 hour ago, doratheexplorer said:

I wonder if we could have some equivalent of an 'L' plate for new members, pinned to their first few posts, so old timers are reminded to cut them some slack.

A new member may well be totally unaware of just how much of a bear pit this forum can be.

 

I still can't wrap my head around why anyone would have a problem with a new member posting about a good experience from a canal business.  We need more positivity on here.

 

I note those members have not apologised.

You could buy a used outboard and get yourself home with that for less than that.

There are several old British Seagull outboards for sale on e bay very cheaply. One type (the Silver Century I think) was known as "The Barge Pusher"

You will need earplugs and a gas mask too!

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15 minutes ago, Mad Harold said:

There are several old British Seagull outboards for sale on e bay very cheaply. One type (the Silver Century I think) was known as "The Barge Pusher"

You will need earplugs and a gas mask too!

 

 

 

And 'gallons' of 2T oil.

Up until 1978 the Seagul was designed to run on a 10:1 ratio mix (1 litre of oil to every 10 litres of petrol). Post 1978 they managed to improve it to a 'better' 25:1 ratio

 

All motors manufactured from January 1978 are designed to operate on a 25:1 petrol (gas)/oil ratio.

Motors manufactured since 1967*** can satisfactorily use this ratio, providing the following modifications are made:

  • FORTY FEATHERWEIGHT and FORTY PLUS MODELS - F & FP series fitted with the Seagull - Villiers carburetor. The No. 3 taper needle at present fitted should be replaced with a No. 2 needle (Part No. V654/2)... taper needle adjustment setting is standard... please see Service Sheet No. 7
  • FORTY FEATHERWEIGHT and FORTY PLUS MODELS - GF & GFP series fitted with the Seagull - Bing carburetor. No modification required.
  • SILVER CENTURY and SILVER CENTURY PLUS MODELS - WS & WSP series fitted with the Seagull - Amal carburetor. The No. 45 power jet should be replaced with the slightly smaller No. 40 jet (Part No. S7/062/40).

***Motors built prior to 1967 should retain the 10:1 petrol oil ratio.

 

They never managed to achieve the economical oil mix that Yamaha did (100:1), or even the Mercury / Mariner at 50:1

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2 hours ago, doratheexplorer said:

I wonder if we could have some equivalent of an 'L' plate for new members, pinned to their first few posts, so old timers are reminded to cut them some slack.

 

That's what the "hand up" new member flag over the avatar is for.  The OP still has it displayed after 14 posts but it doesn't seem to have helped much ...

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13 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

snip

 

They never managed to achieve the economical oil mix that Yamaha did (100:1), or even the Mercury / Mariner at 50:1

 

I think that was because Seagulls, or at least mine, used plain main bearings that need more lubrication than roller or ball bearings.

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2 hours ago, TheBiscuits said:

 

That's what the "hand up" new member flag over the avatar is for.  The OP still has it displayed after 14 posts but it doesn't seem to have helped much ...

Well I never, maybe I should pay more attention. 

 

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