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Marina entrances


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4 minutes ago, Steph H said:

There is probably an explanation for this but I can't think of it.

 

Why are marina entrances so narrow?

Because normally the marina is dug out before connection to the canal. When the final removal of the bund takes place, it is normally only a diggers stretch from both sides wide.

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7 minutes ago, matty40s said:

Because normally the marina is dug out before connection to the canal. When the final removal of the bund takes place, it is normally only a diggers stretch from both sides wide.

That sounds like it could be true, but in reality its so people can watch you try to navigate in. Some Marina's I swear have score cards that they hand out...  :)

 

I'd love to see a new Marina when they let the water in - it must be up there with one of the best parts of a job!  I presume they have to do it slowly though so the local canal doesn't run dry ... maybe have people at any locks also to open paddles??

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It is generally done very slowly usually by pump , and the bund is left in place whilst it fills.

Then 2 weeks minimum with no water being let in to test the waterproofness of the construction.

Only then is the bund removed...very unspectacular.

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Just now, matty40s said:

It is generally done very slowly usually by pump , and the bund is left in place whilst it fills.

Then 2 weeks minimum with no water being let in to test the waterproofness of the construction.

Only then is the bund removed...very unspectacular.

ok i take it back, sounds like its a bit boring.... i had visions of having a surfboard handy!!

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And CRT require that before the marina is finally connected, a leakage test is carried out to show that it is watertight. To do this two sets of stop planks are placed across the entrance and the space between them is pumped out (so it is clear no water is leaking through the planks). This is maintained for a period of time, and the drop in level of the marina has to be less than a certain amount.

So a marina entrance is needed which can take two sets of stop planks. And that will be relatively narrow.

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3 hours ago, David Mack said:

And CRT require that before the marina is finally connected, a leakage test is carried out to show that it is watertight. To do this two sets of stop planks are placed across the entrance and the space between them is pumped out (so it is clear no water is leaking through the planks). This is maintained for a period of time, and the drop in level of the marina has to be less than a certain amount.

So a marina entrance is needed which can take two sets of stop planks. And that will be relatively narrow.

No, completely wrong. Here is a picture of how the stop planks for a new marina are usually "removed" and the marina filled. 😀

dambuster.jpg.a9acdf8972524c94a65d21fa06c8c1f3.jpg

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When Peter Topping had Cowroast Marina dug out he bought a rather nice historic bridge to span the entrance.  I can't remember where it originally came from.  This determined the width of the entrance. 

A few years ago we nearby moorers watched a widebeam get well and truly stuck in the entrance, because the then owner of Cowroast gave the boater the wrong dimensions.  Oops!

 

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Some great replies thank you. 

 

As a fairly new boater I've just found it difficult getting into a marina at times and its rather off putting when marina staff look at you like your an idiot, so just wondered what the reasoning was.

 

Now when I go into one I'll be marking myself out of 10 and humming the Dam Busters music 🤣🤣

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17 minutes ago, Steph H said:

>>  As a fairly new boater I've just found it difficult getting into a marina at times and its rather off putting when marina staff look at you like your an idiot, so just wondered what the reasoning was. <<

 

Don't worry about it. I've seen boats with bow thrusters making a pig's ear of our marina entrance.

 

It takes practice, and there is only one way to do that!

 

 

Edited by Machpoint005
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When I in the RN and the ship was in dry dock, always interesting to see the sea stopping the dry dock not being a dry dock. Intensional of course. Then the gradual movement of the ship becoming a ship again.

 

I get the same enjoyment with narrow boats.

 

Is it just me?

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2 minutes ago, Nightwatch said:

When I in the RN and the ship was in dry dock, always interesting to see the sea stopping the dry dock not being a dry dock. Intensional of course. Then the gradual movement of the ship becoming a ship again.

 

I get the same enjoyment with narrow boats.

 

Is it just me?

 

It's certainly good to feel the boat float again, after an odd still week on the blocks in a dry dock.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Steph H said:

Some great replies thank you. 

 

As a fairly new boater I've just found it difficult getting into a marina at times and its rather off putting when marina staff look at you like your an idiot, so just wondered what the reasoning was.

 

Now when I go into one I'll be marking myself out of 10 and humming the Dam Busters music 🤣🤣

Speaking as an ex marina worker, we aren’t much better at it, especially when there’s an audience of co workers. Some entrances are worse than others, but the only suggestion I could make would be to go as slow as is practical, depending on the strength of the wind or any other factors such as current. Ignore any other boater who wants you to hurry up and do it at your own pace.

There’s one marina I can think of that can only be got into bows first from one direction, if you boat is over 55 ft. We found that out when we got there....

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53 minutes ago, Nightwatch said:

When I in the RN and the ship was in dry dock, always interesting to see the sea stopping the dry dock not being a dry dock. Intensional of course. Then the gradual movement of the ship becoming a ship again.

 

I get the same enjoyment with narrow boats.

 

Is it just me?

It's just you 🤣

Iirc when lifting in dry dock in Gibraltar after repairs and new props there was little movement. Also I was on the first frigate ever to dock in the new frigate complex at devonport in 77 on HMS Galatea and again smooth as silk. However I spose its to be expected unlike the toy boats we now own lol. 

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9 hours ago, robtheplod said:

That sounds like it could be true, but in reality its so people can watch you try to navigate in. Some Marina's I swear have score cards that they hand out...  :)

 

I'd love to see a new Marina when they let the water in - it must be up there with one of the best parts of a job!  I presume they have to do it slowly though so the local canal doesn't run dry ... maybe have people at any locks also to open paddles??

There used to be a video of one the newer marinas being filled, but this is the only one I can find now.

 

 

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9 hours ago, mrsmelly said:

All wrong so far. It's actually to stop numpties with wide beams escaping out of the marina when moored in stupid locations like the North Oxford etc. 

And Dunchurch Pools had to get special permission to have a wide entrance and long stop planks (to get the fat ones in and out)

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6 hours ago, Steph H said:

Some great replies thank you. 

 

As a fairly new boater I've just found it difficult getting into a marina at times and its rather off putting when marina staff look at you like your an idiot, so just wondered what the reasoning was.

 

Now when I go into one I'll be marking myself out of 10 and humming the Dam Busters music 🤣🤣

Lovely - remembering folks of the past, who tend to get forgotten (B.W.'s daughter was in a snall music group in which we sang - thus a more related reminder)

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