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OldGoat

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Everything posted by OldGoat

  1. Hmm - is the OP talking about using 3 pin 13A 240v sockets to distribute 12 facilities ? If so bad practice, but on your own boat...... (Mebe of no interest, but I decided many years ago that 12V caravan type sockets were "not the best" so I used 3 pin mains sockets instead - in the hope that visitors would have to stop and ask how/why to run 12v kit from said 3-pin kit. It also meant that I could wire my snall 12v kit into the 3-pin setup Has worked fine for xx years...
  2. 1. Because they can 2. Market forces 3. cost of holding stock for items that (may not) fail. Mine is 30+ years old and still works (I hope)....
  3. You may jest but - I'vw had no interest in my well specified boat - I thin k it's because it doesn't have a white interior. Lovely carpets and acres of best quality machined oak panelling...
  4. Yes - an adjustable plummer block (dunno correct term) but widely (!) available from companies who suply industrial belts / transmissions. Must go Dinner gond has sounded.
  5. All the experts (including me) have fixed the problem over the years -and probably forgotteh what they actually did. The challeng is that the rudder and stock (shaft) arn't balanced and trying to trplace the bottom end shaft into the cup requires a certain amount of torcision coulped with brute force - these are mutually exclusive. Overtanging trees or bridge structures can help - but both you / the boat/ the water flow / conpsire to make your efforts in vain. IIRC I fixd mine with some G-cramps and a pair of chassis stands (neither of which you may not have to hand...). This is where the native British inventiveness comes int play.... FWIW my solution was to replace the trusty welder's fixed upper bearing with a swivel type so that NEXT TIME it was more a matter of just angling the whole assembly. Not a lot of use to you now - but maybe food for thought next time...
  6. I don't 'really' know - but to get the 'discussion' going - No - it was a basin for working boats to load / unload, then whe there was no working traffic - somebody (ABC ?) saw a business oportunity. Now I wait an inrush of locals to disagree....
  7. We like to see the world go by - and The Management (who is a dab hand with a sewing machine made heavy lined curtains to keep the heat in!
  8. One of the (many) challenges with narrowboating is that you have to compromise with fittings / components. Caravan windows just don't look right - but they do let the light in!
  9. May be - but the power consumption is low anyway so the PF not a major consideration?
  10. Agree - you're right. I was really trying to suggest to newcomers that sometimes/ often a boat that's nearly optimum can merely be modified with a bit of 'lateral thinking' to give what is needed, rather than bemoaning a lack of suitable craft. It's what people did with cars many years ago...
  11. As usual / often this thread has drifted away from the original request (and so have I). Might I suggest that - presented with a vessel that the OP decides - maybe on a whim - it's the one for him / her - that it's worth considering maximising the internal usable space, becaus for most new-comers, comfortable interior space for all UK conditions suggests as long a steel cabin as possible is best. The steering position on a trad can be adapted DIY to be steered from within the hatch; sitting on the top of the roof using a mix of carriage folding steps and extending /lifting the tiller so that it can be steered from aloft. The advantage is that a used boat can be modified to achieve that on a DIY basis - rather than searching for the complete article from the outset. Your ultimate / target boat probably doesn't exist BUT something that can be modified with a Birmingham Scredriver and a 'leccy drill is more achievanle than waiting for the Holy Grail to fall into your lap. Hone what skills you have and mebe extending them is better than being stopped at the starting point.
  12. I would go for a 'full trad' hull type -for why:- A semi-trad IME suffers from an uncomfortable seating area at the rear - not the least because the hull sides and top make it uncomfortable to sit at the rear and makes working on the engine awkward at the best OTOH A full trad makes use of the space above the engine to store 'stuff' / somewhere to put a washing machine (etc) and other bulky stuff. A more practical compromise would be to have a cruiser stern with a pram hood which covers the steerer and guests in inclement weather - but less for storage as it's insecure... For liveaboard / CCing a full trad hull is best...
  13. As a retiring Thames and canal boater might I add some extra points - Most canal boats venturing onto the Thames are underpowered for "yellow - stream increasing" boards. No huge problem while you are moving with or against the stream. However the problems start when you have to change direction (pick up a mooring, etc) or navigate through a restricted opening - for example Sonning bridge upstream or downstream. I built our boat with a 50 HP engine 2'3" draught and a Crowther propellor, but still go carefullly (or not navigate at all...)
  14. Very droll - brownie points fo humour....
  15. Depends where you touch it! If you touch on the sheet metal casing when running the casing and the more solid parts of the engine will be cooled by the fan. Whan the engine stops, there's no more cooling, but the heat from the engine block convects to the casing - whis presumably is where you feel the heat. Anywhichway - that's perfectly normal. At the seme time (if you're silly enough) touch the engine block - you'll fnd that's a lot hotter (ouch) - be careful....
  16. 'They' made some changes to the 160 and relaunched it as the 260. IIR the mods: were for heavier dity proper marine boats (as the 160 is well over spec: for canal boats - even for a changed National engine....
  17. The only time(s) we've had problems anywhere on the canal system were 'around the corner' from Worcester bar where our head lilne was untied at aroud 04:00 and we were awakened by the bow hitting the wall of the flats opposite. On the second occasion the head line was untied - but we had added the security of a chain and two padlocks....
  18. If the Basingstoke is your first 'proper canal' then - apart from the scenery, you might be disapointed in that - AFAIK - wild moorings are few and far between as it is shallow and the profile is more V than U shaped. If you enjoyed the Wey, then the 'stoke is similar, but narrower. We spent our first five years on out own boat (having cruised the canal system for many years) on the Wey and enjoyed it - especially as Pyrford - two or three owners ago was a great place to moor. Just as well as there were not many overnight moorings on the Wey. We moved to the Thames and had a mooring on a island which was great unitl that was sold... We used our current marina bankside mooring as a stepping stone to the canal system - two days up to Oxford with its access to the rest of the canal system - where we originally cut our boating teeth. Happy to answer questions. ps: The Thames above (say - Reading) or mebe Oxford where the big boats can't go is peaceful with 'proper' manual locks that area joy to operate and friendly lockies. Lots of places to moor and walk. Mebe a scaled up version of the Wey, without the restrictions.
  19. Possibly a fresh-out-of-training-surveyor doing everything by the book Or there's too much stuff on board, including ballast?? Being a small boat it's easy to over ballast...
  20. Yes, indeed M'lud. I was too lazy to dig out it's name. It can be a bit of a pig to navigate as the flow from the Wey stream can pus you off course if thgere's some flow from the river.
  21. We launched our boat (60 ft) some considerable time ago and spent 5 years on the Wey. Hopefully you may have done some research before considering these two river / canal locations. The following is not intended to diminsh your selection but you might care to consider - Being a (mostly) river navigations, there are very few 'wild' moorings available (shallow bankside) There is only one hire base (subject to correction) The locks are heavy and for best results need a long windlass (available for hire) Facilities are sparse - but sufficient if you plan ahead On a more positive side, the RHS gardens at Wisley is a centre of horticultural excellence and both Guildford and Godalming are good to visit. If you can work out how to get there on foot, Brooklands Motor museum is worth a visit ( As a school leaver I undertook a short works course in the days of the ill fated TSR2 project and the porduction of the VC10 passenger aircraft. BArnes Wallis (of bouning bomb fame) worked there and you can see his office). The National Trust staff were magnificent and helpful I know nothing of the Basingstoke 'canal' as the access lockks were being restored during out stay. I see young Mr. Brooks has made a comment about a log bridge on the Basi: and there's a very low bridge a the beginning of the Wey - I have to duck down from the helm on our boat and remember to remove the lifebuoy before passing through. Great to cruise if you want to visit some of the 'sites' along your trip (avoiding a pun...), but as a specfic cruise, I have my doubts. Now, if it's part of a holiday on the Thames - then that's another matter....
  22. I discovered that from my hiring days, sooooo whenI biut our boat I fitted NiFe batteries They've been working solidly for 20 years in my ownership. (Blurry heavy , lots of cells, take loads of space. Designed for low maintenance they have a large water reservoir and can be left for ages without needing a charge, though they will discharge slowly when left.
  23. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  24. 'Proper' engines have clear markers (some with text) across the dipstick. Some less proper have nicks in the side of the dipstick. Is yours of this type mebe?
  25. My (big brother) MX60 has a filter built in to a sleeever / tube which also contains a filter - This did get blocked some years ago. Migh be worth having a look if all else fails?
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