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I would like to learn what various items were used for on the old working boats.  I have seen some beautiful photographs of the boats but not knowing the names or the terminology of the items I haven’t a clue what to search for!  Could anyone be so kind As to point me in the right direction of a suitable resource?

Thank you

Martin

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This list is quite reasonable 

 

https://www.iims.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Glossary-of-Narrowboat-and-Canal-terms.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwik5dTHharrAhUjQ0EAHe4-AwQQFjABegQIBRAB&usg=AOvVaw3xsEQkd9pW0knlVayQ6uII&cshid=1597935368407

 

Downloads a pdf from the IIMS (International institute of marine surveyors). 

 

ETA if I had known about "backering" twelve years ago I might have gone for that as an alternative to getting together with a woman and "bickering'. 

 

Horses which can do the towage by themselves sound pretty cool.

 

Edited by magnetman
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I'll add 3 bits of small but significant bits of lock ironwork. 

 

Butterfly - that cast iron part which holds the handrail vertical parts.3 bolts. Not all lock gates have them. Grand Union most locks have butterflies. 

 

Groove irons. The grooves where the stop planks go above and below locks. 

 

Breast irons. The vertical guard irons fitted to the lock gates where they meet to help prevent damage from boats breasting the gates. 

Edited by magnetman
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29 minutes ago, magnetman said:

This list is quite reasonable 

 

https://www.iims.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Glossary-of-Narrowboat-and-Canal-terms.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwik5dTHharrAhUjQ0EAHe4-AwQQFjABegQIBRAB&usg=AOvVaw3xsEQkd9pW0knlVayQ6uII&cshid=1597935368407

 

Downloads a pdf from the IIMS (International institute of marine surveyors). 

 

ETA if I had known about "backering" twelve years ago I might have gone for that as an alternative to getting together with a woman and "bickering'. 

 

Horses which can do the towage by themselves sound pretty cool.

 

 

Really good list, thanks for posting it. Tested it by looking up several of what I thought were obscure terms, sure enough they were all in there. Added to my favourites.

 

 

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1 hour ago, magnetman said:

This list is quite reasonable 

 

https://www.iims.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Glossary-of-Narrowboat-and-Canal-terms.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwik5dTHharrAhUjQ0EAHe4-AwQQFjABegQIBRAB&usg=AOvVaw3xsEQkd9pW0knlVayQ6uII&cshid=1597935368407

 

Downloads a pdf from the IIMS (International institute of marine surveyors). 

 

ETA if I had known about "backering" twelve years ago I might have gone for that as an alternative to getting together with a woman and "bickering'. 

 

Horses which can do the towage by themselves sound pretty cool.

 

Thank you very much, I appreciate it.

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Embarrassed to admit how long it took me to figure out “ trad stern “ is just short for traditional stern 😅

only a small thing but never heard it until recently , odd !
Thank you for making this post , the resources are helpful to me too : o)

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Image by Edward Paget Tomlinson.

18301717_10212484570645314_7994502199372215630_n.jpg

 

Water can on roof, sometimes called a "Buckby Can." Used for storing drinking / cooking / washing water.

Mop (rag mop), for cleaning the boat down.

Hand bowl, used as a washing up bowl, for washing, preparing food etc.

Cabin or side strings used to store cotton line and dry it from the heat of the stove.

Tiller strings used to keep the tiller in a central position in locks so it doesn't catch the lock wall.

Cross straps used for towing an unloaded butty close to the motor.

Snubber a longer line used for towing a butty astern.

Tipcat, button fender, swans neck, ellum, ram's head.

"Mate", steerer's wife. 

 

Many many more.......

 

Cross straps.jpg

23032524_1324344331028596_2380391318543707389_n.jpg

18893045_1933588333553820_1026584337311264463_n.jpg

c559808f-ad19-4942-b704-6efa4971f858[1].jpg

Edited by Ray T
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On 20/08/2020 at 16:00, magnetman said:

This list is quite reasonable 

 

https://www.iims.org.uk/wp-content/uploads/2014/03/Glossary-of-Narrowboat-and-Canal-terms.pdf&ved=2ahUKEwik5dTHharrAhUjQ0EAHe4-AwQQFjABegQIBRAB&usg=AOvVaw3xsEQkd9pW0knlVayQ6uII&cshid=1597935368407

 

Downloads a pdf from the IIMS (International institute of marine surveyors). 

 

ETA if I had known about "backering" twelve years ago I might have gone for that as an alternative to getting together with a woman and "bickering'. 

 

Horses which can do the towage by themselves sound pretty cool.

 

The real difficulty in attempting to put something like this together is that terminology changes from canal to canal, and region to region. For example, those operating boats on the eastern end of the L&LC were happy to be called bargemen, but it was something of an insult to those from the western end. Names for the various types of paddle gear - some are called 'types' in Yorkshire - are extremely varied, as are the names for specific details of lock construction. The list linked gives mainly modern and narrowboat, or is that narrow boats, terms.

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