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Goldfish


Jerra
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During a recent visit to the Erewash Canal we were tied up on the visitor moorings near the Steamboat Inn at Trentlock. Standing idly watching the world go by through the side hatch I noticed some colour in the water near the boat. Looking more closely it was n 8 inch Goldfish.

 

Obviously this was either an escapee from a pond during a flood or a deliberate release. How it had survived Pike Zander, herons etc. I don't know it rather stood out like a sore thumb.

 

It made me wonder has anyone seen any other goldfish (or for that matter other exotics) round the canal system?

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I've seen what was either a koi or a bloody large goldfish in Braunston marina, again, not sure how as it is also full of hugenormous killy fish as well!

 

There are areas of South London that are rife with wild parrots, it's a well known "thing..." When I worked in practice in Richmond, periodically we'd have one in the wildlife/isolation section that a member of the public had brought in.

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When we were based at Etruria, about five years ago, I was astonished to see a terrapin a mile or so north of the Marina on the T&M. It was basking on a large, mostly submerged rock on the offside of the cut and it was about 9 inches long. I reversed back to get another look (partly in disbelief) when a local on his bike pulled up: "Oh, you've seen him then, people have been trying to catch him for ages". Never saw it again, despite looking in the same spot when we passed.

You want green parrots, we've got thousands of them in N. London, bloody noisy things!

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The "Parrots" people are mentioning around London are actually Ring Necked Parakeets.

 

They are noisy buggers!

 

When we were on board Python at The Rickmansworth Festival (sleeping under cloths) I got woken up very early by them and their raucous call!

 

It is a call I am more used to when we holiday in Goa where their cousns have a slightly more rose tinted hue to heir plumage

 

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This is going back to the days of my youth so memory may be a bit hazy. We were visiting relatives who lived at Radnor Park, Glasgow, at the time. There was a stretch of canal that Singer used as cooling water. In this area were masses of goldfish, which I assume a few had been released and had bred.

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I've seen terrapins

There was a massive terrapin below Stamp End Lock, Lincoln for a long while. Not seen it this year though.

 

Also some big goldfish in our marina. They go into the shallows around the edge of the lakes to bask in the sun during the summer. Again our lakes are full of monster pike so not quite sure how they manage to survive.

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There was a massive terrapin below Stamp End Lock, Lincoln for a long while. Not seen it this year though.

.

There a whole family of terrapins at barrow on soar on the island.

 

Returning to the op. it was goose fair last weekend. There always use to be an increase in goldfish in the cut at Stanton the week or so after goose fair.

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This is going back to the days of my youth so memory may be a bit hazy. We were visiting relatives who lived at Radnor Park, Glasgow, at the time. There was a stretch of canal that Singer used as cooling water. In this area were masses of goldfish, which I assume a few had been released and had bred.

yes Ray, your memory is correct. There were a lot of goldfish in the Forth and Clyde outside the Singer Sewing Machine factory. The water was warm from the cooling system and I think many Glaswegians dumped thier goldfish there. There were some pretty big ones.

 

haggis

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Lots of old houses had fish ponds for food over winter so there may be species of carp that thrive in cold UK waters.

 

Lots of new houses have ponds full of ornamental carp, the cold weather doesn't bother them at all.

 

Their only disadvantage in the wild is their bright colours which provide no camouflage.

 

Perhaps, because they do seem to survive in spite of this, their gaudiness acts in a similar way to brightly coloured insects and acts as a "I don't taste very nice" warning.

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