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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/06/23 in all areas

  1. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  2. If you need to adjust the trim you're just asking for rubble
    4 points
  3. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
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  6. On a full length boat you sometimes need to put the rudder right over to be able to reverse up to the cill far enough to open the bottom gate(s). If the rudder travel is limited the rudder must be more vulnerable to damage when a surge carries the boat rapidly backwards in a lock.
    3 points
  7. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  8. Fazeley is an obvious ending point much ignored by the organisers
    3 points
  9. Slide the stem up the plate on the gate. The water movement holds the boat in place, just make sure you are touching before opening paddles and most importantly there's nothing sticking out of the plate!
    3 points
  10. It doesn't appeal to me for a couple of reasons in my view. 1 - once in position you have no way of checking whether ant rusting is taking place and if for any reason the area where the concrete is gets wet you won't be able to check that it hasn't found its way underneath. Boats can and do flex, and although it may appear to be a perfect sea, over time ot may move slightly allowing water ingress. 2 - If ever you need to remove some or all of the ballast to change the trim of the boat or if you add weighty items which may lead to a need to redistribute ballast it will be a major job to remove. In my view it is a quick way of adding ballast but for the reasons above it may be a problem in later years after purchase. Howard
    3 points
  11. That is true if the boat is moving forward but a stationary boat with a big rudder can turn in its own length by putting the rudder at 90deg using fwd an reverse. The rudder blocks the flow of the water to from the prop as well as pushing water out sideways. If you see what I mean
    2 points
  12. I don't. There are times when being able to put the tiller hard over is advantageous. A rudder stop is the equivalent of stabilisers on a bike, might be handy if you have no idea but prevents you using the full capabilities of the vessel.
    2 points
  13. Well the best news for this trip is not one single volockie encountered. No-one at Fradley, or Bratch, or any of the other locks including Stourbridge 16 and Delph. By some miracle we seemed to cope! And it was very relaxing!
    2 points
  14. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  15. The water doesn't evaporate, it becomes chemically combined within the concrete. Concrete doesn't dry, it goes off.
    2 points
  16. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  17. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  18. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
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  20. Confirmed that this solved the issue! Thanks everyone, definitely learnt something from this.
    2 points
  21. Could a mitigation for tiller injuries be as simple is reducing the arc through which the tiller can swing? In almost all NB designs the rudder can swing until the lifting eye on the top rear of the rudder hits the side of the counter, and that's close to 90 degrees. It's actually a far wider swing than is useful for steering: the maximum sideways force is generated when the the rudder is about 45 degrees (or maybe a bit more) from straight ahead. Moving the rudder further than that is pointless or even self defeating. If stops could added to the rudder mechanism, maybe in the top bearing, to control the rudder movement over a controlled arc rather that the arc that just happens to be allowed by the geometry of the rudder/lifting-eye/counter then it could be engineered to be less likely to toss a steerer over the side whilst still allowing enough movement for efficient steering. MP.
    2 points
  22. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  23. I've mentioned this before, but worth repeating. I was following a boat whose steerer was swept off the counter. She was fiddling with an umbrella, the rudder hit an underwater obstruction, it swung round and in she went. I always steered from the step with the tiller in the small of my back.
    2 points
  24. With hindsight it should have been left there so nothing other than narrow beam craft could pass through!
    2 points
  25. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  26. I’m meeting Paul Whitewick this week to make a video (for his channel) so will share when he uploads. Tonight I uploaded the Perseverance trip boat being the first to reach Stroud brewery in 70 years. The area is being dredged at the moment.
    1 point
  27. Well some of the BCN locks have multiple ground paddle outlets including behind the bottom gates. But otherwise (and I’m totally guessing!) it might be to do with the direction the water comes out of the paddle culvert. If the water comes out pointing across the lock, the flow will be turbulent, just thrash around as it bounces off the opposite wall etc, and so Bernoulli doesn’t really kick in. But if the flow is directed more along the bottom of the lock, then the flow will be more laminar and that is when you get the Bernoulli effect.
    1 point
  28. The top of a steel tank can be very corroded, but the bottom and sides are often "pickled" in that the tank contents have done no harm, but may have preserved the metal somehow. Check very carefully the state of the tank top, if it's not sound, then complete removal may be the only way to stop smells. Be aware the bottom of the tank may be the base plate of the boat, so don't cut it out! If it has an inspection plate, then it's in with a hose pipe and scrubbing brush, followed by pump out and rinse. This is the true meaning of D.I.Y! Bod
    1 point
  29. Pump it out, flushing if you can. Then dose it with Jeye's Fluid, a gallon will be ample, fill it completely with water and let it stand for a week before pumping out. If there is a port, vac it out with a wet 'n dry vac and let it dry out.
    1 point
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  31. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  32. I'm a bit concerned that the OP's wife 'no longer feels the love'. If that is love for all boating rather than simply the boat in question, then changing to a 'cheaper to own/run' boat won't address the whole issue. Apart from changing to a shorter steel or fibreglass boat, other potential options include both hiring and shared ownership. Hiring is great for exploring different parts of the waterway system and shared ownership can suit those with limited time for boating.
    1 point
  33. There is a danger of some misunderstanding here. Essentially, concrete offers good protection to the steel reinforcement (or baseplate). Something to do with its alkalinity. However, over time concrete is subject to carbonation arising from CO2 in the atmosphere, which reduces its protective properties and can lead to spalling following expansion of the reinforcement. It is then you have a problem, as the concrete hides the trouble and then obstructs the usual scrape & paint means of addressing the rust.
    1 point
  34. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  35. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  36. Episode eight also includes a section which shows the canal children's boarding school, Wood End Hall Hostel in Erdington. Information online shows that the Hostel operated from 1951 to 1968, and by the time of its appearance in 'Flower of Gloster' only a small number of children were resident there.
    1 point
  37. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  38. That looks possible. Maybe they did look that bad in 1967, but they're *miles* from Wolverhampton, they couldn't possibly have gone that way due to a mapreading mistake... Not complaining, it's a drama series not a canal-accurate travelogue -- I wondered if it was an arm somewhere that had since been closed, but it seems not.
    1 point
  39. I suspect the 2.5 minutes were just for up or down movement. I used to work the tripboat Lapwing for Peter Froud in 1972, with Charlie Atkins as steerer. Going down, we would reverse into the tank as we were approaching from Runcorn. Once in, the gates would descend, followed by several large handfuls of wet sawdust to ensure a seal. Charlie often used to walk down so he could have a chat with anyone who was around, and I would tell the passengers that he did that because he was sure the lift would collapse. I made sure they looked up at the gearing as it began to move, as if it had been raining, water would have filled the shrouded gears, and this would descend onto anything underneath. At the bottom, Charlie would get back on board so we could continue after winding in the lower basin. I learnt a lot in the time I worked with Charlie, particularly when I got to steer when we were travelling empty. He would spend much of the time telling me stories, which was the traditional way canal knowledge was handed down - the dead body stories were best!
    1 point
  40. By way of illustration, see diagram (yes I know I can’t draw!) current path 1 is the desired path, through the shunt. But the connections to hull via the prop shaft, exhaust and cables, plus your battery negative to hull wire, create a second current path 2. Which is bad. You can’t delete the the inherent connections between engine and hull so the only way to break circuit 2 is to remove the wire from battery negative to hull.
    1 point
  41. You need to have a single connection between battery negative and hull. Typically this will happen somewhere on the engine even if it only via the exhaust, prop shaft, control cables etc. Because the aforementioned things may be highish resistance, best practice is to have a dedicated cable from the engine block to the hull. But definitely nothing from the domestic battery negative to the hull because as I explained, it creates an alternative current path from engine negative to battery negative. This is bad on two counts, firstly it screws up the shunt reading (because current is bypassing the shunt) and secondly current is flowing through the hull which might be a source of corrosion. So delete the direct connection from battery negative to hull and replace it with a connection from engine casing to hull. Remember, with 2 or more connections to the hull a circuit is made. With 1 connection to the hull, there is no circuit. No circuit means no current can flow through the hull.
    1 point
  42. Charging around so much he had all five paddles raised at the same time on one of the Audlem locks. Interesting methods of getting to the lockside when entering from below too. I noted the working boat practice of opening the gate paddle first, I think as a means of holding the bow to the cill?
    1 point
  43. The only thing connected to the negative post of the batteries should be the cable to the shunt, every thing else connects to the other side of the shunt, it is then impossible for anything to bypass the shunt..
    1 point
  44. And I don't see why it needs an Adverc with Li batteries, if anything it will complicate things by excessive charging voltage. The start LA battery will always be all but fully charged until it starts to internally short, so no advantage from the Adverc.
    1 point
  45. So no markings but from Google images it seems to be a Leece-Nevil self exiting alternator so no need for any external excitement. From: https://cadencestoragecdn.azureedge.net/prestolite/Document Library/PartVideos/Videos/LBP2180_TSB-1028_WIRING_DIAGRAM_8LHA-BLD-LBP.PDF We can deduce that the terminal with the small red wire on it is B+ and the other one on the posit side is B- The three small terminals are AC phase taps so that explains the 7V, it will probably alter as the speed rises and falls. It is very likely that this is half wav rectified AC or even full AC. This is a quality alternator. Are you talking about a proper battery charger or something like a Sterling AtoB or BtoB. Never seen a proper charger that you can't turn on and off. I also don't understand why the rising voltage as the alternator energise won't control the charger.
    1 point
  46. A great challenge was enjoyed by all on Melaleuca and, at least for the Moomins, it continued on the way home. I left Melaleuca in the bridge-ole at the tail of lock 8 on the 21 to go back and close the gates and, as is my habit, I took the stern rope ashore and left it on the towpath., just in case the boat should drift a bit. I was delayed avoiding a chap on an electric bike coming through the bridge and by the time I'd closed the gates and got back to the bridge-ole, the boat had drifted off into the pound and I was just in time to see the end of the stern rope disappear into the water. Bad words may have been uttered at this point. The boat drifted to the middle of the pound and then the wind blew it gently onto the mud on the offside, in full view of the bin-lorry drivers queuing to drop loads at the waste incinerator. We tried running water through, but anything we did made a wave that just lifted the boat further onto the mud. The pound was on weir already so no way to increase the level. In the end there was nothing to do but get in. I have to say that the good folks of Wolverhampton were total unfazed by me wandering around on their towpath wearing boots and undercrackers only. No noticeable reactions at all. I grabbed the bow rope and tried pulling, but I couldn't get any purchase at all standing in 3ft of mud, so I had to go to the stern and climb up the skeg/swansneck/button to get back on board. Then it was easy to reverse off and take her into the next lock. Apart from that, it was a straightforward run: I'd say that the Wolverhampton 21 was by far the best lock flight on the trip. It's in a much better state than Famers Bridge or Aston. All the paddles work easily and none of the back gates leak. Diesel at Turners in Wheaton Aston is 83.9 pence per litre. MP.
    1 point
  47. Ah, but you would have seen a young me for about two seconds, so not all waste. That said, the Nairn programme is excellent and what he says still makes sense today.
    1 point
  48. I'm glad it's not just me...
    1 point
  49. Fancy not having "Black Safari" on that list... 1972 classic. Oops! Must read thread before posting, but at least I linked the film!
    1 point
  50. At least some path improvements do prioritise trees and nature.
    1 point
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