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Showing content with the highest reputation on 05/06/23 in all areas

  1. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  2. If you need to adjust the trim you're just asking for rubble
    4 points
  3. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
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  6. On a full length boat you sometimes need to put the rudder right over to be able to reverse up to the cill far enough to open the bottom gate(s). If the rudder travel is limited the rudder must be more vulnerable to damage when a surge carries the boat rapidly backwards in a lock.
    3 points
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  8. Fazeley is an obvious ending point much ignored by the organisers
    3 points
  9. Slide the stem up the plate on the gate. The water movement holds the boat in place, just make sure you are touching before opening paddles and most importantly there's nothing sticking out of the plate!
    3 points
  10. It doesn't appeal to me for a couple of reasons in my view. 1 - once in position you have no way of checking whether ant rusting is taking place and if for any reason the area where the concrete is gets wet you won't be able to check that it hasn't found its way underneath. Boats can and do flex, and although it may appear to be a perfect sea, over time ot may move slightly allowing water ingress. 2 - If ever you need to remove some or all of the ballast to change the trim of the boat or if you add weighty items which may lead to a need to redistribute ballast it will be a major job to remove. In my view it is a quick way of adding ballast but for the reasons above it may be a problem in later years after purchase. Howard
    3 points
  11. That is true if the boat is moving forward but a stationary boat with a big rudder can turn in its own length by putting the rudder at 90deg using fwd an reverse. The rudder blocks the flow of the water to from the prop as well as pushing water out sideways. If you see what I mean
    2 points
  12. I don't. There are times when being able to put the tiller hard over is advantageous. A rudder stop is the equivalent of stabilisers on a bike, might be handy if you have no idea but prevents you using the full capabilities of the vessel.
    2 points
  13. Well the best news for this trip is not one single volockie encountered. No-one at Fradley, or Bratch, or any of the other locks including Stourbridge 16 and Delph. By some miracle we seemed to cope! And it was very relaxing!
    2 points
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  15. The water doesn't evaporate, it becomes chemically combined within the concrete. Concrete doesn't dry, it goes off.
    2 points
  16. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
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  20. Confirmed that this solved the issue! Thanks everyone, definitely learnt something from this.
    2 points
  21. Could a mitigation for tiller injuries be as simple is reducing the arc through which the tiller can swing? In almost all NB designs the rudder can swing until the lifting eye on the top rear of the rudder hits the side of the counter, and that's close to 90 degrees. It's actually a far wider swing than is useful for steering: the maximum sideways force is generated when the the rudder is about 45 degrees (or maybe a bit more) from straight ahead. Moving the rudder further than that is pointless or even self defeating. If stops could added to the rudder mechanism, maybe in the top bearing, to control the rudder movement over a controlled arc rather that the arc that just happens to be allowed by the geometry of the rudder/lifting-eye/counter then it could be engineered to be less likely to toss a steerer over the side whilst still allowing enough movement for efficient steering. MP.
    2 points
  22. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  23. I've mentioned this before, but worth repeating. I was following a boat whose steerer was swept off the counter. She was fiddling with an umbrella, the rudder hit an underwater obstruction, it swung round and in she went. I always steered from the step with the tiller in the small of my back.
    2 points
  24. With hindsight it should have been left there so nothing other than narrow beam craft could pass through!
    2 points
  25. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  26. One of the Birmingham booklets is now for sale here: https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/175758581192
    1 point
  27. Well some of the BCN locks have multiple ground paddle outlets including behind the bottom gates. But otherwise (and I’m totally guessing!) it might be to do with the direction the water comes out of the paddle culvert. If the water comes out pointing across the lock, the flow will be turbulent, just thrash around as it bounces off the opposite wall etc, and so Bernoulli doesn’t really kick in. But if the flow is directed more along the bottom of the lock, then the flow will be more laminar and that is when you get the Bernoulli effect.
    1 point
  28. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  29. The Dutch barge I brought in Belgium had concrete ballast. The barge was built in 1917 and the build was 5.5mm steel, it was converted to a pleasure boat in 1985 when the concrete was put in. At the time this was very common and the inside of the hull was covered in what they called bilge grease a very thick black grease and the concrete was poured on top, looking at it from the top it appeared to be well compacted and not a large aggregate mix. They left a hole against the rear bulkhead for a bilge pump. We had the boat surveyed before purchase and the expert was not worried about the concrete and some of the bottom was still above 4mm after70 years. During our ownership we had some doubling done and the shipyard was used to working on boats with concrete ballast and knew how to proceed. In my former life I owned a precast concrete company and amongst our products we made pre stressed bridge beams and all the beams for west ferry circus at Canary Wharf. To lessen the problem of the so called concrete cancer the mixes were designed to be as low alkaline as possible which involved cement from a certain plant, large aggregate from the Trent valley but the local sand was ok. We also made paving slabs using granite and the manufacturing method made them very dense and they would absorb very little moisture once fully cured. Many of you with paving ballast in boats from the 70s to 95 could well have our product.
    1 point
  30. Telemachus has a good reverse so we sit very near the back of the lock and just open one paddle then the other. The important thing is to engage reverse as soon as you feel the bow dip and before it starts to move forward, then not much revs needed to hold station. If you are dozy and let it get a few feet forward, then it can be difficult to get it back again. I think it’s important to realise that the boat moves forwards because the flowing water suffers a decrease in pressure (Bernoulli’s effect) so the level at the front of the lock drops, putting a slope onto the water, and the boat slides down the slope. So the first thing that happens is the bow dips, second thing is the boat starts to accelerate, third thing is it’s moving forward significantly. If you catch it at the first thing, all is sweetness and light but if not… If I’m doing it single handed, which is rare, I use a line/bollard to hold the boat back. I am not keen on the riding the gate thing for the reasons already mentioned.
    1 point
  31. I agree. Concrete ballast and integrated water tanks are both no-no's for any reputable builder so being told by one builder they do both of these would have me running for the hills. Unless you want the narrowboat equivalent of a Trabant car. Water tanks should be in a material that needs no internal maintenance e.g. stainless steel or PVC. Mild steel is just daft for a £200k new boat.
    1 point
  32. Having never seen the series I am enjoying it very much, not least to see the attractive Ann (Annette Robertson) whom many young (male) viewers fell in love with. Although portrayed as an older teenager I was surprised to discover she was in fact around 27 when she played the role (the same age as Richard O'Callaghan) and had many film roles to her credit before this including Barbara in 'Summer Holiday'
    1 point
  33. Don't fancy the idea. Sounds like a convenience solution. Not sure of the cost differential between that way and using engineering bricks.
    1 point
  34. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
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  36. The resultant Safety Flyer is still on the MAIB website at https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/safety-lessons-narrow-boat-propellers. But it really needs to be somewhere more accessible if the safety lessons are to be available to current newbie boaters.
    1 point
  37. I would advise sticking to Wolverhampton 21, this is only their second trip, and there’s just the two of them. The other thing with the Wolverhampton 21 is the water is crystal clear on upper locks at least which is very pleasant to see. Birmingham Wolverhampton Lichfield are all good places to visit these days in the right areas, art galleries for the first two, plus theatres. The jewellery quarter for Bham and nearby shopping and the Cathedral area in Lichfield is great. The bridge over the Trent at Great Hayward is lovely too, IIRC it’s the way to Shugborough. Disappointingly it was pretty weedy last year which is probably not ideal for the mortar or structural integrity
    1 point
  38. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  39. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  40. That's a bit of canal history I wasn't aware of. Amazing what you can find by watching kids TV, isn't it? 🙂 Now waiting for Episode 9 to see Chocolate Charlie teaching them how to get a boat and butty through a flight of narrow locks, you could see the towline being laid out at the end of Episode 8. I predict some kind of mild peril will follow... 😉
    1 point
  41. That looks possible. Maybe they did look that bad in 1967, but they're *miles* from Wolverhampton, they couldn't possibly have gone that way due to a mapreading mistake... Not complaining, it's a drama series not a canal-accurate travelogue -- I wondered if it was an arm somewhere that had since been closed, but it seems not.
    1 point
  42. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  43. Just watched all the way up to Episode Seven -- fascinating stuff... 🙂
    1 point
  44. Modern 'elf and safety, innit
    1 point
  45. I like the bit where that chap said the Anderton Lift took I think two and a half minutes, it took me forty five a couple of weeks back
    1 point
  46. MajorDolby'sCat has now uploaded episode seven, which includes an interesting scene at (what the film says) is Spon Lane Locks. It includes shots of a disused boatyard which may be Clayton's.
    1 point
  47. Dismissed by who I wonder? Now it's a timepiece. A look into a world some of us knew but know we'll never see the likes of again. So some of the continuity is up the spout, that's tv production for you, still the same today. And the charging round the boat and the locks definitely dodgy. I noticed Richard O'C nearly slip and fall in, in one clip. Wonder if eventually he did get a ducking? Perhaps we'll find out in future episodes if ever Major Dolbys cat ever gets back from mousing excercises. Right on cue I see episode 5 has arrived......
    1 point
  48. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  49. Was the canal made for broad beam boats? Everything I read says it was, so who is the interloper?
    1 point
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