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howardang

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howardang last won the day on December 20 2018

howardang had the most liked content!

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Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    East Yorkshire
  • Interests
    Anything to do with boats, ships and the sea.

Previous Fields

  • Occupation
    Retired
  • Boat Name
    58ft semi trad Winthorpe (Share)
  • Boat Location
    Wigrams Turn Marina- Aqueduct Marina Spring 2020

Recent Profile Visitors

10626 profile views
  1. Here is an interesting and worrying slant - an article from the Miami Herald - on the way the US are acting, and especially relevant for anyone who might have friends or relatives away at the moment on a cruise ship in US waters. It was posted this morning on a shipping website I follow. The implications for some passengers who may be cought up in this could be very worrying. https://www.msn.com/en-us/news/us/co...cid=spartandhp Coast Guard tells cruises to prepare to care for sick people for 'indefinite period' By Alex Harris, The Miami Herald 6 hrs ago The U.S. Coast Guard is now directing ships registered in the Bahamas to seek aid from that country first — even if the ships are owned by Miami-based companies. It is also advising ships with more than 50 aboard that they may be sequestered “indefinitely.”© AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee Cruise ships are docked at PortMiami, Tuesday, March 31, 2020, in Miami. The U.S. Coast Guard said Tuesday that it's working with Holland America on a detailed docking plan that would require two ships carrying passengers and crew from an ill-fated cruise to handle all medical issues without impacting South Florida's already-stressed hospitals. (AP Photo/Wilfredo Lee) The Coast Guard issued that and other new rules this week in the face of an increasing number of requests to medically evacuate people from the dozen-plus cruise ships hovering off Miami’s coast, according to a public memo. The new framework requires cruise lines to arrange for private transportation for those who are sick rather than relying on the Coast Guard. After the Miami Herald published this story on the memo, it became temporarily unavailable on the Coast Guard website. It is available now. As calls pour in to ferry sick people to land, the district has had to improvise field hospitals “whose capacity for dealing with critical patients is unproven at this time,” read the memo signed by Rear Admiral E.C. Jones of the Seventh District, which includes Florida, Puerto Rico, Georgia and South Carolina. The memo was posted on a Coast Guard website and directed toward passenger vessels registered in foreign countries — which includes nearly all cruise ships in the South Florida-based fleet. The directive’s new rules for dealing with sick patients upends the processes now used by cruise lines for dealing with the increasing number of cases of COVID-19 aboard their ships. Seventeen ships are lined up at Port Miami and Port Everglades, with more than a dozen others hovering miles offshore. Most have only crew aboard, but several still carrying passengers are steaming toward South Florida ports. In SEC filings Tuesday, Carnival said it has more than 6,000 passengers still at sea. New sailings were halted by all major lines on March 13. Normally, when cruise ships have someone on board who is too ill for the ship’s medical team to care for, officers simply call the Coast Guard and get a medical evacuation to a nearby hospital. Now, sick passengers and crew could be sequestered indefinitely. Under the new protocol, ships with more than 50 people aboard are being asked to stock up on medical supplies and medical staff, enough to care for patients “for an indefinite period of time.” All large ships have infirmaries equipped to deal with minor injuries and stabilize patients with more serious conditions. “This is necessary as shore-side medical facilities may reach full capacity and lose the ability to accept and effectively treat additional critically-ill patients,” the memo said. Cruise ships seeking to send a sick person to shore must first consult with the Coast Guard, which may now recommend keeping the passenger onboard instead. If the transfer is OK’d, the cruise line is now responsible for booking commercial transportation to shore, a private ambulance, and confirming that there is a hospital bed available for the patient. The memo also mandates that all ships in U.S. seas report an updated count of sick and dead people aboard each day or face “civil penalties or criminal prosecution.” It refers to this as an “on-going requirement.” Most cruise lines have been reporting illnesses publicly, though not daily. Ships “loitering” just outside U.S. territory, especially those flagged to the Bahamas, are now asked to seek aid first in the Bahamas, before “seeking support from the limited facilities in the U.S.” This applies to ships that are registered in the Bahamas but owned by Miami-based companies including Carnival Corp., Norwegian Cruise Line Holdings and Royal Caribbean Ltd. The Bahamian capital of Nassau is about 185 miles from Miami. The new procedures come following the Monday medical evacuation in Port Everglades of two sick crew members from two different Royal Caribbean ships. A spokesperson for the company would not confirm if the patients were COVID-positive but said they had “respiratory issues.” Another crew member was evacuated Tuesday morning from the Crown Princess, also docked near Port Everglades. It is owned by Carnival Corp. subsidiary Princess Cruises. And there are more ships on the way. Tuesday afternoon, Broward County Commissioners debated allowing a Holland America Line ship, the Zaandam, to dock in Port Everglades later this week. No decision was reached. Carnival Corp. Chief Maritime Officer Bill Burke told commissioners the company wanted to evacuate two COVID-positive passengers from Zaandam to Mexico today, but Mexico turned them away. He said Peru, Ecuador, Colombia, Martinique, Cuba, Guadeloupe and Barbados wouldn’t allow the ship to dock. The plan for the Zaandam, as with most cruise ships near South Florida, is to treat passengers on board unless they get so sick they need to be taken to a local hospital. Last week the Zaandam’s sister ship, the Rotterdam, took on hundreds of healthy passengers from the Zaandam after screening them for high temperatures. Cruise line officials said they hope to also bring the ship to Port Everglades Howard
  2. I agree with all you say, even though I like pigs> I love the quotation - "Dogs look up to you, Cats look down on you but Pigs look you straight in the eye!" Howard
  3. On of my hobby horses is the misuse of "Marine Engineer". The waterways are awash with them but very few actual marine engineers. Mostly fall into the category of fitters, and some of them are very good, but some others ...well who knows! And before anyone suggests that I am a marine engineer let me assure them I am not, and never have been. I leave it to the proper experts, many of whom can be found on this very forum🤥 Howard
  4. That may be true, although I remember on one of her earlier posts she said that she implied that she had been a boater for many years, and indeed she also said that she held a boatman's licence. If that is the case then surely she is not a Newbie and should know what to expect, both in a marina and also around and about on the cut? Howard
  5. Which marina are you in - Viking or Goole Boathouse? Have you had a word with the manager who may be able to help. Howard
  6. I wouldn't be at all surprised, by which time who knows what else may be in the pipeline! Howard
  7. It seems that CRT have pulled the plug on your plans. In their latest Boaters Update just over an hour ago they have called for all non-essential boating to cease, so it looks like you are stuck in Goole for at least three weeks or so. Whatever I may think, please stay safe and the sooner we can all get back to normal the better. Howard
  8. Just for the record, I never used the phrase "catch the disease, I said succumb;,something that can happen despite the undoubted self confidence you have in your knowledge. With your self professed expertise I am just a little surprised that you haven't offered your services to the hard pressed NHS. Have a good holiday, and lets keep our fingers crossed that you don't become one of the statistics we are reading about daily. Howard
  9. So on your "non jolly" despite your self proclaimed expertise you succumb to the virus, are you happy about the unnecessary work which would be incurred in looking after you? I'm sorry but in my view your justifications don't hold water. Howard
  10. Aren't we all at one time or another? Howard
  11. If, as you say, you are an "expert" in hygiene and disease control, may I suggest that your attitude suggests that you definately need a refresher! And you also need to read and follow the rules that have been imposed on all of us for the common good. Watch the current video by medics whose message is "Stay at home!" and unless you are sillier than I suspect is the truth, you know that your home is your boat moored in Goole Marina. Howard
  12. We are based at Wigrams Turn - another Castle Marina -and we have had the same advice this morning. Howard
  13. I keep mine in my pocket all the time. Howard
  14. Your comment caused me to check, and I too joined on the first day - Oct 8th 2004 - having, like you, been a member of the previous forum. Unlike you, however, I have only met a very small number of members so I have no knowledge of the great majority of them, even to knowing their real names or what they get up to when not on the cut. There was a move at one time for members to identify themselves when out and about by displaying a forum sticker but I haven't seen any of these for a long time. Does the idea still exist? Howard
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