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35 minutes ago, Captain Pegg said:

Highly debatable that a knot isn’t metric. Don’t be confused by the use of the term ‘mile’ in nautical mile. It’s got nothing to do with the imperial statute mile.

 

A nautical mile is derived from the distance at the Earth’s surface of the chord between two radials separated by an angle of one minute at the Earth’s centre. Degrees, minutes and seconds while not SI units are recognised measures under that system.

 

A nautical mile is internationally acknowledged as being exactly 1852 metres having been standardised to the SI unit for length. Therefore a knot is 1.852 km/hour.

 

And back to topic, can I point out that the term “shiny boat” is as much metaphorical as it is literal. Not all boats that shine are ‘shiny boats’.

 

JP
 

 

Never mind these new fangled metre things... a Nautical mile is, and will always be 6080 feet, otherwise I'll get lost!:boat:

 

Howard

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46 minutes ago, Captain Pegg said:

A nautical mile is internationally acknowledged as being exactly 1852 metres having been standardised to the SI unit for length. Therefore a knot is 1.852 km/hour.

Strange that the NM is shown as not being an SI unit :

 

 

 

A nautical mile is a unit of measurement used in air, marine, and space navigation, and for the definition of territorial waters. Historically, it was defined as one minute of latitude along any line of longitude. Today the international nautical mile is defined as exactly 1852 metres. 

 

Unit of: Length

1 M, NM, or nmi in: is equal to

Unit system: Non-SI unit

Statute mile: ≈1.15

Metre: 1852

Symbol: M, NM, or nmi

Foot: ≈6076

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36 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

Strange that the NM is shown as not being an SI unit :

 

 

 

A nautical mile is a unit of measurement used in air, marine, and space navigation, and for the definition of territorial waters. Historically, it was defined as one minute of latitude along any line of longitude. Today the international nautical mile is defined as exactly 1852 metres. 

 

Unit of: Length

1 M, NM, or nmi in: is equal to

Unit system: Non-SI unit

Statute mile: ≈1.15

Metre: 1852

Symbol: M, NM, or nmi

Foot: ≈6076

Oh dear, I am going to have to upgrade my Excel spreadsheet that I use to compute speeds from a series of readings (time, lat, long) from the digital log on my phone (Mxmariner).  At the moment I am assuming the earth is a perfect sphere ....

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On 06/10/2020 at 14:47, mark99 said:

The worst/best snack for me was Waitrose  'mignons morceaux' which were basically heavily garlic'ed croutons.

 

They were so darn more-ish - very difficult to stop eating - only 30 mins after demolishing, I stunk of garlic and mouth felt wrecked. As well as ruined taste buds for 6 hours. Not to mention burps!

 

They have been discontinued.... fortunately I think.

That takes me back! My mum used to love those. I would try to snaffle some from her when I was a kid. We called them Minging Morso's ? You would do garlic burps for a week after eating them. 

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3 hours ago, Flyboy said:

Knots are not metric, they're nautical miles per hour.

 

Since a nautical mile is (roughly, still) one minute of arc along any line of longitude, it is related directly to the size of the globe and is especially useful for lumpy water navigation.

 

It is neither imperial nor metric. A nautical mile just happens to be of similar length to a statute mile. 

 

We inland boaters navigate by mileposts, so it makes sense to measure our speed in mph.

 

 

 

Edited by Machpoint005
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46 minutes ago, Scholar Gypsy said:

Oh dear, I am going to have to upgrade my Excel spreadsheet that I use to compute speeds from a series of readings (time, lat, long) from the digital log on my phone (Mxmariner).  At the moment I am assuming the earth is a perfect sphere ....

As long as you don't travel more than 65,535 nautical miles your Excel spreadsheet will work fine. You don't work for Serco on Test and Trace by any chance?

Jen ?

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29 minutes ago, Jen-in-Wellies said:

As long as you don't travel more than 65,535 nautical miles your Excel spreadsheet will work fine. You don't work for Serco on Test and Trace by any chance?

Jen ?

Thank you, I will bear that in mind!

 

No,  I don't work for Serco. Whenever anyone worked up a spreadsheet for me I always asked what consistency checks they had built in. Occasionally this got a blank look, which rang alarm bells.  For example a column of figures, with several sub-totals and then a grand total. It's very easy to get this wrong (and especially so if you add extra rows later on and forget to amend the sub-total formula), and very easy to write a consistency check for the grand total. 

 

I also spent a lot of time on implementing this excellent report (which followed the West Coast franchising saga) in my bit of the bureaucracy, which should be read by anyone who runs models or algorithms. https://www.gov.uk/government/publications/review-of-quality-assurance-of-government-models

In the test and trace context, I am just gobsmacked that nobody thought to build in a daily (and independent) check that the number of rows of data imported into the master database was equal to the number sent in by the various labs. It's just basic accounting. 

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4 hours ago, Captain Pegg said:

A nautical mile is internationally acknowledged as being exactly 1852 metres having been standardised to the SI unit for length. Therefore a knot is 1.852 km/hour.

So there you go... 65kph sounds much better than 40mph

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3 hours ago, Machpoint005 said:

 

Since a nautical mile is (roughly, still) one minute of arc along any line of longitude, it is related directly to the size of the globe and is especially useful for lumpy water navigation.

 

It is neither imperial nor metric. A nautical mile just happens to be of similar length to a statute mile. 

 

We inland boaters navigate by mileposts, so it makes sense to measure our speed in mph.

 

 

 

But is the earth expanding or shrinking

 

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2 minutes ago, Loddon said:

Just remember that you're standing on a planet that's evolving
And revolving at 900 miles an hour.
It's orbiting at 19 miles a second, so it's reckoned,
The sun that is the source of all our power.
Now the sun, and you and me, and all the stars that we can see,
Are moving at a million miles a day,
In the outer spiral arm, at 40, 000 miles an hour,
Of a galaxy we call the Milky Way.

Careful, if the NBTA see this they won't need to untie their ropes at all and still claim they are travelling. :giggles:

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12 minutes ago, Tracy D'arth said:

Question.

 

Why does the earth, and as far as known all the planets in our little system, rotate?

 

But the moon doesn't.

 

The sun does, at different speeds at the poles compared with the equator..:offtopic:

The moon orbits the Earth once every 27.322 days. It also takes approximately 27 days for the moon to rotate once on its axis. As a result, the moon does not seem to be spinning but appears to observers from Earth to be keeping almost perfectly still. Scientists call this synchronous rotation.

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15 minutes ago, Tracy D'arth said:

Question.

 

Why does the earth, and as far as known all the planets in our little system, rotate?

 

But the moon doesn't.

 

The sun does, at different speeds at the poles compared with the equator..:offtopic:

It does, otherwise you wouldn't see the same side from wherever you look on earth would you?

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1 minute ago, alias said:

It does, otherwise you wouldn't see the same side from wherever you look on earth would you?

 

2 minutes ago, Flyboy said:

The moon orbits the Earth once every 27.322 days. It also takes approximately 27 days for the moon to rotate once on its axis. As a result, the moon does not seem to be spinning but appears to observers from Earth to be keeping almost perfectly still. Scientists call this synchronous rotation.

Not relative to the sun.   Floyd worked it out, there is a Dark Side Of The Moon.

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6 minutes ago, Tracy D'arth said:

 

Not relative to the sun.   Floyd worked it out, there is a Dark Side Of The Moon.

Only figuratively. A new moon has the side we can't see  opposite us facing away from us bathed in sunlight.

Edited by alias
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6 minutes ago, Tracy D'arth said:

 

Not relative to the sun.   Floyd worked it out, there is a Dark Side Of The Moon.

You wanted to know if the moon rotated and I gave you the answer. You better tell NASA then, as this is from their website :-  https://moon.nasa.gov/about/misconceptions/

 

Misconception
The Moon does not rotate.

Reality
The Moon does spin on its axis, completing a rotation once every 27.3 days; the confusion is caused because it also takes the same period to orbit the Earth, so that it keeps the same side facing us.

 

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