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Snob boaters


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3 hours ago, Paul Gwilliams said:

remember as Oscar Wilde is quoted as saying “I may not agree with you, but I will defend to the death your right to make an ass of yourself.”

Actually, that quote is generally attributed to Voltaire.  He never actually said it though; it was invented by his biographer, Evelyn Beatrice Hall.

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13 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

A milk bottle (wide-necked) retained by the helm is quite useful, (particularly on a Trad stern, you can even wave to folks with impunity 'as you go')

And for the lady boater? https://www.biovea.net/uk/product/detail/6740/female-urination-device-lavender/?TI=GGLUKR&C=N&wiz_medium=shopping&wiz_source=google&wiz_campaign=United Kingdom Shopping&gclid=CjwKCAjwq_D7BRADEiwAVMDdHjj7KGp9KZHG3CJlQwezDR5dZx_1T7iL8cU5YhV_36h7ARU0yTnK_xoCMHsQAvD_BwE

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9 hours ago, WotEver said:

Actually, that quote is generally attributed to Voltaire.  He never actually said it though; it was invented by his biographer, Evelyn Beatrice Hall.

I don't think so!

The quote is Oscar Wilde's take on an earlier saying, which is indeed attributed to Voltaire.

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5 minutes ago, David Mack said:

I don't think so!

The quote is Oscar Wilde's take on an earlier saying, which is indeed attributed to Voltaire.

 

9 hours ago, WotEver said:

Actually, that quote is generally attributed to Voltaire.  He never actually said it though; it was invented by his biographer, Evelyn Beatrice Hall.

 

An ironic argument, given the thread title?

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There is certainly an element of snobbery and one-upmanship and has been for ages, albeit in the minority. Been on hire boats and had passing private boaters turn their noses up or make comments implying we didn't know what we were doing etc. The very occasional boater pulling their nose up at my cruiser or sneering reference to "my plastic boat". I've no doubt a similar thing went on with Springers when there were more of them around.

 

I don't understand why things like Cruisers, Sea Otters, Aintree Beetles and Springers etc get labelled by some as 'a starter boat'...what makes them 'a starter boat'? Why should the ultimate destination be something big?

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4 hours ago, restlessnomad said:

not sure about banning.. the original post had t**t which is milder than c**t (unless you are aussie)

And that (the latter, I don't mind the former at all) is the one word I do find offensive because it is often used aggressively imo.

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1 hour ago, Philip said:

There is certainly an element of snobbery and one-upmanship and has been for ages, albeit in the minority. Been on hire boats and had passing private boaters turn their noses up or make comments implying we didn't know what we were doing etc. The very occasional boater pulling their nose up at my cruiser or sneering reference to "my plastic boat". I've no doubt a similar thing went on with Springers when there were more of them around.

 

I don't understand why things like Cruisers, Sea Otters, Aintree Beetles and Springers etc get labelled by some as 'a starter boat'...what makes them 'a starter boat'? Why should the ultimate destination be something big?

Mine's 40 foot, both a starter and finisher as far as narrowboats go. My next one will be a cruiser. It's a bit like posh car drivers, I think. They still only get from A to B, and get stuck in the same traffic as me. Boating is a great thing, and all that matters is that the water stays outside where it belongs. But I agree any snobbery is a minority pastime, though a bit more prevalent than a while back, but then there are more boats about, too.

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2 hours ago, Philip said:

I don't understand why things like Cruisers, Sea Otters, Aintree Beetles and Springers etc get labelled by some as 'a starter boat'...what makes them 'a starter boat'? Why should the ultimate destination be something big?

If by 'cruisers' you mean GRP then they cost from (say) £1000 to £5.7 million (or more) I was recently looking at the new 80 footer from Princess Yachts with a 'label' of 'STARTING' from £4m

 

However you must admit that the majority of GRP boats on the canals are towards the bottom end of the price range, and hence the term 'starter boats' folks with little disposable income who want a steel NB and find they cannot afford it will end up with either a Springer or a GRP cruiser.

 

For some, their 'starter boat' will last them for many years, works well for them and they have no reason or inclination to 'trade up' - why should they, if they are happy with what they have, stick with it.

 

I have two GRP boats  and do not feel inadequate (or that they are starter boats) when compared to any canal boat, fat, narrow, steel, wood or GRP.

 

It doesn't look like a 40+ MPH,  54 tonne, 80 foot, £4m+ boat does it

 

PRINCESS_S78_Hi-3764-credit Quin BISSET RT.jpg

 

PRINCESS_S78_Hi-2484-credit Quin BISSET RT.jpg

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13 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

 

 

 

It doesn't look like a 40+ MPH,  54 tonne, 80 foot, £4m+ boat does it

 

 

 

 

It does look a bit confused though, wondering why its speed and length have been expressed in British measures but its weight in metric.

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6 minutes ago, Athy said:

It does look a bit confused though, wondering why its speed and length have been expressed in British measures but its weight in metric.

40 MPH sounds a lot better than 35 Knots.

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13 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

... It doesn't look like a 40+ MPH,  54 tonne, 80 foot, £4m+ boat does it

i'm not sure Alan, but i'm willing to let you buy me one for extensive testing so i can give you a definitive answer.

 

purely for academic purposes of course ;) 

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48 minutes ago, Athy said:

It does look a bit confused though, wondering why its speed and length have been expressed in British measures but its weight in metric.

It is a bit weird, especially since a metric tonne and imperial ton are as close to being the same mass as to make no difference in most circumstances. Especially in a 40 ton/tonne gin palace where the difference between the two will only be couple of G&T's in weight.

Edited by Jen-in-Wellies
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37 minutes ago, Hudds Lad said:

i'm not sure Alan, but i'm willing to let you buy me one for extensive testing so i can give you a definitive answer.

 

purely for academic purposes of course ;) 

can u put alan on top of boat in second pic... thanks... :)

Edited by restlessnomad
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Highly debatable that a knot isn’t metric. Don’t be confused by the use of the term ‘mile’ in nautical mile. It’s got nothing to do with the imperial statute mile.

 

A nautical mile is derived from the distance at the Earth’s surface of the chord between two radials separated by an angle of one minute at the Earth’s centre. Degrees, minutes and seconds while not SI units are recognised measures under that system.

 

A nautical mile is internationally acknowledged as being exactly 1852 metres having been standardised to the SI unit for length. Therefore a knot is 1.852 km/hour.

 

And back to topic, can I point out that the term “shiny boat” is as much metaphorical as it is literal. Not all boats that shine are ‘shiny boats’.

 

JP
 

 

Edited by Captain Pegg
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5 minutes ago, Captain Pegg said:

Highly debatable that a knot isn’t metric. 

 

 

 

And back to topic, can I point out that the term “shiny boat” is as much metaphorical as it is literal. Not all boats that shine are ‘shiny boats’.

 

JP
 

 

I'm not going to debate it. But I'm certainly going to question your second assertion. Shiny boats have well-maintained, glistening paintwork and metalwork (maybe ropework too, though that doesn't really shine).  So of course a boat which shines is shiny. Are you going to suggest that a boat which is painted black is white?

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Mine shines when its wet because the paints been polished so much its almost back to undercoat, apart from where it is back to undercoat.

Had to do some remedial repairs this month. Found waterways light blue from when they abused the living daylights out of her.

 

Bw lister engine painting program

 

Open engine room doors.

Throw tin of bwb light blue through doors

Shut doors. Sign off job. Go for tea break.
‘no buggerlnickthat’

Edited by roland elsdon
Missed line
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