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Chewbacka

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Chewbacka last won the day on December 12 2016

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    Automotive Quality engineer - retired
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  1. I don’t know how your pipes lie, but if the pump is a low spot you need to have flow from both sides and without clamping you might not.
  2. You need to let the air out, so loosen the highest joins and that is where the air should be. I would also then clamp a pipe going to the pump then loosen the joint on other side of the pump and let a bit of liquid out hopefully bringing any air with it, tighten the joint, then repeat for the pipe on the other side of the pump.
  3. The circuit comprising the anode (usually magnesium on fresh water), the cathode (boat metal) and the electrolyte (canal water) makes a battery. Like all batteries it supplies power, just in this case not very much power at all. If you were to disconnect the anode from the boat and put a current meter between the anode and boat you would measure a small current. If your boat is lucky and the anodes last years, the current will be tiny.
  4. In case you missed my post whilst you were typing it was - it’s a centrifugal pump so if there is a big air bubble in the pump it will never clear as a centrifugal pump can't shift air.
  5. Good idea, but as it’s a centrifugal pump so if there is a big air bubble in the pump it will never clear as a centrifugal pump can't shift air.
  6. Agree with the above, there are constant tales of people trying to live in a floating house without shore power that always ends the same way - knackered batteries. Possibly lithium batteries need looking at as they charge much faster than lead acid, so you may get enough into them in your hour or so in the evening and they are far more tolerant of undercharging. But they are expensive, and the more power you want to use in a day, the more of them you will need. So you do need to consider power usage.
  7. I suspect the biggest driver of corrosion is bad shore power on both shore side and boat side. Even a good boat in a ‘bad’ marina or next to a ‘bad’ boat is going to suffer. If I was suffering serious corrosion of my hull, anodes would not be my first thing to look at, it would be leakage currents from the marina and adjacent boats.
  8. I would not be in the least surprised if a significant number are under estimating their propulsion percentage.
  9. I have no idea if their propulsion declarations are accurate, just that a typical declaration at one place is much less than 60%.
  10. What their true usage is doesn’t matter, at present they are buying diesel and declaring about 25% (or less) for propulsion, so they will see a big increase when moving to 100%.
  11. Water composition is critical, and as water becomes more conductive anode material changes otherwise the anode ‘effect’ is too strong and paint will start lifting. So sequence is magnesium for fresh, then aluminium then zinc for sea water.
  12. Whilst hmrc has guidance of 60:40 last time I bought some red diesel from a canal side place he was writing my details in his book, so I had a look and saw one at 60% most were 25 to 55% with a couple at 10%. So I suspect most liveaboards are going to see a big increase in their spend.
  13. Yes but the power wasted is simply turned into heat and as the inverter is inside the boat, you still keep the heat.
  14. Not new technology, already existing, so as you cross from north to south the inspector on his occasional visit to the waterway will call out - ‘got any red in there?’ ‘No’ ’ok, carry on’ see no delay.
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