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fergyguy

What Price kindling ?

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Not looking to start a debate on the actual use of kindling or any other kind of wood but was just wondering how much you would expect to pay for a potato sack full of very dry soft wood kindling like in the picture just so I have an idea what is the right price to be paying

Edited by fergyguy
Trying to add pictures

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Just now, mrsmelly said:

 

There was one. It went up in flames. 

 

5 quid for 25kg which is the same as we pay for spuds. Cheap as chips. 

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Pictures not loading for some reason?

46 minutes ago, fergyguy said:

Not looking to start a debate on the actual use of kindling or any other kind of wood but was just wondering how much you would expect to pay for a potato sack full of very dry soft wood kindling like in the picture just so I have an idea what is the right price to be paying

 

7A610731-547B-4EB4-8800-4181C950BC2D.jpeg

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What is this "pay" of which you speak? Always manage to acquire enough one way, or another to start the fire during the autumn and spring. In the winter, the fire stays lit for weeks on end.

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Dry Pine cones are especially good for kindling when you are trying to start a fire and don't cost a penny 

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Dry pine cones now theres a thought seeings I live in the beautiful county of Nottinghamshire with Sherwood Forest full of pine cones lol

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At Hawne Basin I think they charge about £3 for a net of kindling of about that size. On the other hand I fill that net with chopped up pallets acquired locally for nothing, depends if you want the exercise?

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7 minutes ago, nbfiresprite said:

Dry Pine cones are especially good for kindling when you are trying to start a fire and don't cost a penny 

When you say, "dont cost a penny", where do you find them, and how long does it take you to collect enough to light your fire, say, 10 times?

 

I buy a bag of kindling, (green net sac type of thing), for about £3 and, however quickly it takes you to get to your source of pine cones, and however quickly it takes you to collect them and get home, I would rather give someone £3 not to do it :)

 

Not a criticism though....... If you enjoy doing it, and get something out of the saving of the money, then it wouldn't be worth it to you to give someone the 3 quid.

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29 minutes ago, Richard10002 said:

When you say, "dont cost a penny", where do you find them, and how long does it take you to collect enough to light your fire, say, 10 times?

 

I buy a bag of kindling, (green net sac type of thing), for about £3 and, however quickly it takes you to get to your source of pine cones, and however quickly it takes you to collect them and get home, I would rather give someone £3 not to do it :)

 

Not a criticism though....... If you enjoy doing it, and get something out of the saving of the money, then it wouldn't be worth it to you to give someone the 3 quid.

You must be welded to your car seat. Never take a walk through a wood? The ground in Pine woods are covered in a layer opon layer of cones, time to fill a bag less than a minuite. A bag lasts a week. but than my daily commute takes me through a wood anyway.  But then you could always get your Grand Kids to collect them for you.

Edited by nbfiresprite

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1 hour ago, fergyguy said:

Pictures not loading for some reason?

 

7A610731-547B-4EB4-8800-4181C950BC2D.jpeg

But that's not kindling wood. That's the second layer, which is set alight by the kindling (thin lightweight wood) and which, in its turn, sets light to the logs and then to the coal.

To answer your query, nothing. Gather it throughout the year and it will b e ready for late autumn when you need your stove.

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This is for chopping into kindling sorry I didn’t make that clear but at £1 a bag which takes some lifting I reckon a bit of chopping isn’t much of an issue and the majority of what’s in the bag is thin and perfect to use as it is.

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When I get home from the pub after bellringing the last thing I want to do is go out looking in pine woods to gather pine cones to light the stove.

 

More than happy to pay about the six quid a bag costs locally for a decent bag of kindling like that. I can earn six quid in about 90 seconds. 

 

 

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1 hour ago, nbfiresprite said:

You must be welded to your car seat. Never take a walk through a wood? The ground in Pine woods are covered in a layer opon layer of cones, time to fill a bag less than a minuite. A bag lasts a week. but than my daily commute takes me through a wood anyway.  But then you could always get your Grand Kids to collect them for you.

Not much time in the car these days.

 

Rarely walk through a wood - never been my cup of tea, to be honest.

 

Dont have a daily commute any more, and none of the routes I take are through woods, never mind pine woods.

 

No kids, never mind grandkids. If I had any, and asked them to collect enough to fill a green net bag, i'd feel obliged to give them more than 3 quid for their efforts :) 

 

Like I say..... I'm happy to hand over my 3 quid. You're happy to collect it yourself. Neither of us is wrong.

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48 minutes ago, Athy said:

But that's not kindling wood. That's the second layer, which is set alight by the kindling (thin lightweight wood) and which, in its turn, sets light to the logs and then to the coal.

 

 

It looks like any kindling I've ever seen for sale. You're being a bit pedantic. It may be used as the second layer but it's still called kindling. 

 

 

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Personally I find chopping & splitting kindling very therapeutic...it’s exercise for the body and the mind....each to there own though! Quite looking forward to breaking up a few pallets when we get back to base...I think the trick is to have a good few bags “in stock”...that way you can do more at a time to suit you rather than panicking when you need to light a fire. 

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7 hours ago, Mike the Boilerman said:

. I can earn six quid in about 90 seconds. 

£240 an hour, I didn't realise you were that cheap ;)

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Outside our house is a massive pair of pine tree's in the highway island/woods.

 

Their cones drop off and roll downhill into our driveway to the front door. Like a free source of firelighters on a conveyor. They work well.

Edited by mark99

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Sister in Law gave us a Chrissy present a couple of years ago bought from a twee source, probably a craft fair. It was a beautifully crafted paper bag of 'no doubt' expensive firelighters.

 

Basically the 'firelighters' were pine cones as big as goose eggs, dipped into something that smelt of accelerate, then dipped into 'pretty' coloured wax. Each cone was tied neatly with a pretty hessian ribbon around it's girth which colour coordinated with the wax. The ribbon acted as a wick.

 

We had to be brave to use them :(. I'm pretty certain they wouldn't have passed any consumer safety test. 

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1 minute ago, Jennifer McM said:

Sister in Law gave us a Chrissy present a couple of years ago bought from a twee source, probably a craft fair. It was a beautifully crafted paper bag of 'no doubt' expensive firelighters.

 

Basically the 'firelighters' were pine cones as big as goose eggs, dipped into something that smelt of accelerate, then dipped into 'pretty' coloured wax. Each cone was tied neatly with a pretty hessian ribbon around it's girth which colour coordinated with the wax. The ribbon acted as a wick.

 

We had to be brave to use them :(. I'm pretty certain they wouldn't have passed any consumer safety test. 

They sound as if you should have photographed them before using them! But what safety test would that be? They're supposed to catch fire!

Speaking of wicks, we save candle ends and add them to the paper and the kindling, very useful of the wood has somehow got damp 

8 hours ago, blackrose said:

 

 You're being a bit pedantic. It may be used as the second layer but it's still called kindling. 

 

 

Not at all. I am simply using the word in the way that I always have, and as my parents did also.

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1 minute ago, Athy said:

They sound as if you should have photographed them before using them! But what safety test would that be? They're supposed to catch fire!

Speaking of wicks, we save candle ends and add them to the paper and the kindling, very useful of the wood has somehow got damp 

Catch fire but not blow up surely :) 

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Cooking oil works really well as a fire lighter. Catches easily, burns for a long time, but no explodey tendencies. Wipe the frying pan round after cooking with a paper towel and put in the stove ready for lighting.  Saves the sink drain getting blocked with mini fatbergs and keeps the cholesterol levels in the canal fish down!

 

Jen

Edited by Jen-in-Wellies
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53 minutes ago, mark99 said:

Outside our house is a massive pair of pine tree's in the highway island/woods.

 

Their cones drop off and roll downhill into our driveway to the front door. Like a free source of firelighters on a conveyor. They work well.

 

So you too could earn £240 an hour. Sell them for £3 a bag!

 

😃

 

 

 

 

 

1 minute ago, Jen-in-Wellies said:

Cooking oil works really well as a fire lighter. Catches easily, burns for a long time, but no explodey tendencies. Wipe the frying pan round after cooking with a paper towel and put in the stove ready for lighting.  Saves the sink drain getting blocked with mini fatbergs and keeps the cholesterol levels in the canal fish down!

 

Jen

 

 

With the massive added bonus that your stove smells of BACON...!!!!

 

YAY!!!!

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