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canal rules and etiquette


terriegym

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I always approach potential hazards and blind spots with the expectation of having to slow up and give way, but there's also a problem if excessively considerate boaters meet on approaching. I've had a couple of stand-offs where there's been a moment or two of mutual arm-waving beckoning from both sides . What would be the correct flag and horn signals for:

 

"After you."

"No, it's OK, after you."

"No, please, I think you're closer to this bridge hole that's between us, after you."

"But it's much easier if you go first, (then if anything goes wrong, it'll be your fault because I'm not moving), after you."

"Are you towing?, in which case you really should go first, after you."

"I think there's someone coming up behind you, so you'd better come through now, then we can all go in turn, after you."

"I'd hate anyone to think I'm in a rush, after you."

"I know what, I'll reverse back to where I can moor up and let you pass."

"(Darn, wish I'd thought of that first), umm, no it's OK, I'll reverse, I think I'm closer to a mooring spot than you are."

 

LCx

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Seems rather more sensible then waving your arms around and expecting people to know what you mean!

And if you must wave your arms about, confine yourself to signalling what you intend to do. The principle is to signal your intentions or provide information (like holding a line up to indicate "I am about to tie up"), not to order the other boat about.

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And if you must wave your arms about, confine yourself to signalling what you intend to do. The principle is to signal your intentions or provide information (like holding a line up to indicate "I am about to tie up"), not to order the other boat about.

Or just use the prescribed sound signal.

 

It's what it is there for.

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I like your post, Lady C :) How much nicer to have 2 friendly and polite people in a bridge hole stand off than 2, shall we say 'less accommodating' folks who did both know the right horn signals!

 

I'd guess it's only mariners plus a very limited selection of freshwater helmsmen who understand sound signals. I might try one where appropriate, but I don't expect everyone to understand and react to them. Try signalling "I don't understand your intentions" to someone who's sideways across the cut and see what reaction you get!

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Try signalling "I don't understand your intentions" to someone who's sideways across the cut and see what reaction you get!

Easy: the same signal back, meaning "Neither do we". This was often observed from the crews of Canal Time boats.

 

I do agree, we have had a couple of after you, no after you encounters this year, and on each occasion I have said to the other steerer (when we finally managed to pass each other) that we were both most polite and that I wished that all boaters were.

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As far as I'm aware most insurance policies do NOT cover you for towing. So if you have a serious accident whilst towing you could find yourself liable for any damage caused.

 

The narrow boat policies I have seen specifically exclude towing water skiers, but are silent on the matter of towing other boats. So does that mean it is permitted or is not?

 

I seem to recall a butty-owning member here complaining a while back that his insurers had advised that his policy did not cover the butty being towed, yet they had been quite happy accepting his money to insure a 70 ft narrow boat with no engine.

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The narrow boat policies I have seen specifically exclude towing water skiers, but are silent on the matter of towing other boats. So does that mean it is permitted or is not?

 

I seem to recall a butty-owning member here complaining a while back that his insurers had advised that his policy did not cover the butty being towed, yet they had been quite happy accepting his money to insure a 70 ft narrow boat with no engine.

Ours specifically says we are not covered for towing other boats unless in case of an emergency. However we have cover for towing donuts and the like.

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As far as I'm aware most insurance policies do NOT cover you for towing. So if you have a serious accident whilst towing you could find yourself liable for any damage caused.

 

Mine (Navigators and General) does not say anything g about towing or being towed, so, does that mean that as it doesn't say I cannot tow, that in fact I can ?

 

Whilst checking I did notice this clause :

 

If “Sea Wolf” is in Scotland or Ireland, or is less than 21ft (6.5m) in length, during the period 15/10 to 31/3, she will be ashore or in a marina when not navigating.

 

My insurance covers : "Ashore or afloat on inland and coastal waters of the United Kingdom, Ireland, and continent of Europe, Brest to the River Elbe, including inland continental waterways North of 40º 30’ North, and West of 10º East. During the period 1st May to 30th September this area is extended from Bordeaux to Stavanger, including the Baltic not North or East of Stockholm". - however, Scotland is obviously not a desirable place to be between 15th October and 31st March.

Edited by Alan de Enfield
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I recently bought a coaster with the following on

 

GRAMMAR

 

The difference between

 

" Knowing your shit"

and

" Knowing you're shit"

 

Priceless!

 

Dave

Thought that was punctuation not grammar.

 

However, greenie from me.

 

*** edited to say that having just read - http://katherinewikoff.com/2012/10/18/whats-the-difference-between-grammar-punctuation-and-mechanics/, I am not so sure ...

 

 

 

Edited by Allan(nb Albert)
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You don't mind if people leave exit lock gates and paddles open then?

 

That's rarely happened to us so didn't warrant a mention. The list would have been endless if I'd listed everything that irritates us once in a blue moon.

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Ours specifically says we are not covered for towing other boats unless in case of an emergency. However we have cover for towing donuts and the like.

 

 

judge.gif Point of order..........You don't tow donuts........if you can't consume them you donat them to needy others !!!

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I am beginning to wonder if L plates would be a good idea, so I don't get told off by someone in a captains hat and blazer flying a red fag!! Also after talking to a lady at the insurance company today I found out I can NOT tow toys or water skis, but she seemed open to the idea of towing the children if they've been naughty!! Lol

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I am beginning to wonder if L plates would be a good idea, so I don't get told off by someone in a captains hat and blazer flying a red fag!! Also after talking to a lady at the insurance company today I found out I can NOT tow toys or water skis, but she seemed open to the idea of towing the children if they've been naughty!! Lol

I would have thought the opposite was a better punishment biggrin.png

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Or just use the prescribed sound signal.

 

It's what it is there for.

Have to say I'm not sure how good these sound signals are, even when used by so called professional boatmen. When entering Nottingham we passed the Princess River cruise base and I could see that one of the cruise boats had its engine running. As we drew alongside he gave the approved 2 sounds on the horn to indicate he was turning to Port THEN IMMEDIATELY DID SO!!! I was, shall we say slightly less than pleased to have to take avoiding action because he had started closing on me, the follow-on was that the rowing skiff who had been coming up on my port side then had to avoid both me and the cruise boat who was in fact making a U-turn. I think there was then a 'conversation' between the rowers and the skipper of the cruise boat. I'm sure that the cruise skipper would have said 'Well I properly signalled my intentions' he just didn't keep much of a look-out (I think that is rule 5 of COLREGSunsure.png ).

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Have to say I'm not sure how good these sound signals are, even when used by so called professional boatmen. When entering Nottingham we passed the Princess River cruise base and I could see that one of the cruise boats had its engine running. As we drew alongside he gave the approved 2 sounds on the horn to indicate he was turning to Port THEN IMMEDIATELY DID SO!!! I was, shall we say slightly less than pleased to have to take avoiding action because he had started closing on me, the follow-on was that the rowing skiff who had been coming up on my port side then had to avoid both me and the cruise boat who was in fact making a U-turn. I think there was then a 'conversation' between the rowers and the skipper of the cruise boat. I'm sure that the cruise skipper would have said 'Well I properly signalled my intentions' he just didn't keep much of a look-out (I think that is rule 5 of COLREGSunsure.png ).

If he was turning around, I would have expected four short followed by two short.

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