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Lockwood viaduct is the long stone viaduct crossing the Holme valley. Continuing the cricket theme, Lockwood cricket club was in the shadow of the viaduct and local legend had it that only one person had ever managed to throw a cricket ball over the viaduct.

 

The one in the photo is Paddock viaduct over the Colne (and the canal).

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14 hours ago, davidg said:

My dad used to use the term “Holmfirthing” meaning cheating; this referred to the rules of the Huddersfield & District Cricket League which allowed one professional player per team. Holmfirth CC had a large number of players who didn’t live in Holmfirth and they kept winning the league.

The Colne valley and Holme valley were worlds apart.

Ha, i grew up in the Holme Valley and have lived in the Colne Valley for 18yrs, some family and friends still view this as a massive betrayal.

We just bought houses where we got the most for our money, the same residence in the Holme Valley would be near double the money :( 

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Posted (edited)

An interesting challenge could be anywhere and may be a culvert construct for the Leeds & Liverpool Canal after the Board of Trade control ended, or a  new lock. The stationary engine is of interest, maybe Clayton & Shuttleworth, as is the date 24th November 1921.

The New Locks on the Trent were seeking parliamentary approval around that time.

 

Edited by Heartland
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On 12/02/2023 at 20:09, Rob-M said:

Looks like the bridge at the Black Country Living Museum.

 

Was really looking forward to visiting there next month when we are down there this month.

 

Then to my surprise I discovered they dont allow dogs, unlike some other open air museums which allow them in the outdoor areas.

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Posted (edited)

I did recognise the date from the style on other contemporary locks

As I mention in Silent Highways Holme Lock was completed 1922, and Stoke Golding in 1923

They did have a Clayton & Shuttleworth stationary engine for pumping so presumably it was used at Holme Lock first

 

310005.jpg

Edited by Heartland
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3 hours ago, Goliath said:

What’s that structure in the background, behind the engine?

Is it a water tower?

Hard to tell, but it looks like someone’s climbing up side of it on ladder.

Is it a clue to where it is?

Is it Fred Dibnah doing a Sylvester Stallone 'demolition man' impression?

  • Happy 1
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7 hours ago, Goliath said:

What’s that structure in the background, behind the engine?

Is it a water tower?

Hard to tell, but it looks like someone’s climbing up side of it on ladder.

Is it a clue to where it is?

 

It could be a windmill without sails. It appears to be circular with a tapering rise to it.

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8 hours ago, Goliath said:

What’s that structure in the background, behind the engine?

Is it a water tower?

Hard to tell, but it looks like someone’s climbing up side of it on ladder.

Is it a clue to where it is?

I suggest it is a vertical  boiler on a  steam crane a few yards beyond the portable engine,see other pictures. The "someone" climbing up the side will be a water level gauge and pressure gauge. The boiler will be 7to 8ft high and 3 to 4ft diameter. The boiler chimney can be seen complete with adjustable, by a rope, rain cover,  for when the boiler is not being used.

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1 hour ago, billh said:

I suggest it is a vertical  boiler on a  steam crane a few yards beyond the portable engine,see other pictures. The "someone" climbing up the side will be a water level gauge and pressure gauge. The boiler will be 7to 8ft high and 3 to 4ft diameter. The boiler chimney can be seen complete with adjustable, by a rope, rain cover,  for when the boiler is not being used.


ah yes, 

I hadn’t connected the black chimney with it, I thought that were coming of the stationary engine.

 

these photos are good, great to see how things were done

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6 hours ago, Goliath said:


ah yes, 

I hadn’t connected the black chimney with it, I thought that were coming of the stationary engine.

 

these photos are good, great to see how things were done

I love the kettle. They knew how to do things properly in them days ! No messing around with tinny little toy kettles he's got one you would struggle to lift !

 

 

1921.jpg

 

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As I see it, the stationary engine has a tarp over it with the last part of a word showing which could be '. . . . . WORT*Ltd'. [CLAYTON & SHUTTLEWORTH?]

Lying along the top of the boiler would be the chimney in a horizontal position, showing as a long horizontal ridge, covered by the tarp.

The smaller wheels will be at the front of the engine - the smokebox end. And water level gauge would be at the firebox end where the driving controls would be.

What might appear to be 'windows' of the distant structure, may well be hooks on the cross piece of the drawbar, to which chains would be attached connecting to a harness and collar (as in horse).

 

The chimney with rain cap belongs to the crane just beyond the stationary engine, which can be seen as a bulk beyond the front wheels of the stationary engine, the jib also. Nothing to do with the distant structure.

 

I don't know what the building is in the distance, but it does resemble a windmill without sails. The shadow suggests it is circular, and appears to be made of stone.

 

No idea as to where it may be, other than some broad waterway under construction.

 

Bet that kettle would be a three gallon at least.

Edited by Derek R.
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1 hour ago, Derek R. said:

snip…

What might appear to be 'windows' of the distant structure, may well be hooks on the cross piece of the drawbar, to which chains would be attached connecting to a harness and collar (as in horse).

 

snip

It is said that the origins of horse power for such stationary engines reflected the number of horses required to move them.

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Indeed, though a tad more complicated, and represented by the term Nominal Horse Power (NHP). The same delineation was used with self propelled traction engines.

 

From 'A Century of Traction Engines' by W. J. Hughes, member of the Newcomen Society; of the Road Locomotive Society, and of the National Traction Engine Club;

 

"The term nominal horse power (n.h.p.) is really a hang over from early days, probably deriving from the 'horse power' machines or horse works devised to use horses for driving threshing machines and other barn machinery. One type of horse works was a kind of treadmill, where one, two, or three horses side by side, walked on inclined endless belts which moved beneath them, the power thus generated being taken off through a shaft, gearing and universal joints. Another kind was a sort of windlass, the horses being harnessed to the arms, and walking around in a circle. This type was in use until the 1890's or later: a 'one-horse' machine was awarded a silver medal at the 'Royal' at Carlisle as late as 1880.

 

Thus the manufacturer of a 4 h.p. portable engine would intend to purvey to non-technically minded farmers that his engine developed the same power as a 'horse-power' in which four horses were used. In actual practice, the term was quite wrongly used, one nominal horse power being deemed to be equal to '10 circular inches of piston area'. To work out what this meant, or what was supposed to mean, take the square of the cylinder bore and divide by ten to obtain the n.h.p. Example: a cylinder of 9-inch bore: 9 x 9 = 81 : 8 n.h.p. engine! Or cylinder of 6¼-inch bore: 6¼ x 6¼ = 40 nearly : 4 n.h.p. "

 

None of this took into consideration boiler pressure or even stroke, but gave a rough and ready measurement.

 

My youngest daughter applying one actual horse power (George) at Blists Hill.

 

Emilydriving(Medium).jpg.343b9f387d46f73cff5bccad364a37de.jpg

Edited by Derek R.
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6 hours ago, Derek R. said:

The chimney with rain cap belongs to the crane just beyond the stationary engine, which can be seen as a bulk beyond the front wheels of the stationary engine, the jib also. Nothing to do with the distant structure.

 

I don't know what the building is in the distance, but it does resemble a windmill without sails. The shadow suggests it is circular, and appears to be made of stone.

If the chimney belongs to the crane we’d see half the boiler too? For the chimney sits centre top.

7 hours ago, magnetman said:

love the kettle. They knew how to do things properly in them days ! No messing around with tinny little toy kettles he's got one you would struggle to lift !


and the billy cans (?) proper stuff

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5 hours ago, Goliath said:

If the chimney belongs to the crane we’d see half the boiler too? For the chimney sits centre top.
 

In all the other examples of such steam cranes in that set of images, the chimney is shown dead centre of the boiler. So it would appear that the chimney is sat dead center of the near cylindrical 'building' as it appears to be. The catch is, the exposure of the boiler would be much the same as the chimney - dark. But it isn't. It's quite light, and the shadow of the circular chimney clearly makes it round, so too does the shadow of the circular 'building', and it looks to be farther away.

 

I'm not completely conviced my estimation is correct, nor am I convinced the 'lighter' boiler with chimney central is correct.

We need the stationary engine move out of the way to be able to tell for sure.

  • Greenie 1
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This is the original copy I have, which was from an early laser print, hence the lines. It does show that you are looking at a boiler. The second could also be Holme Lock, though the wooden barges are perhaps more interesting.

1921 Trent lock const 044.jpg

Holme Lock, Trent 557.jpg

  • Greenie 4
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On 05/04/2023 at 07:57, magnetman said:

I love the kettle. They knew how to do things properly in them days ! No messing around with tinny little toy kettles he's got one you would struggle to lift !

 

 

1921.jpg

 

 

I became a labourer on a building site for a while when I left school, and one of my jobs was to make tea. They used a bucket similar in size to the one bottom right in the picture, and I simply boiled the water in that, poured in a packet of tea and a tin of evaporated milk - job done 

Edited by Tam & Di
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The reference to Clayton & Shuttleworth is also stated in the records of the construction of the locks in Nottingham Archives

 

Now where is this and it is the right way around, 44 years ago

 

 

 

 

Lock1.jpg

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