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If it takes six men to ..................


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11 minutes ago, Midnight said:

If it takes six men to fit one sign how many broken paddles can be fixed for the same cost?

 

 

sign.jpg

 

You do have to love the 'men at work' sign. As if it wasn't bluddy obvious with all the hi viz on display.

 

 

Edited by The Happy Nomad
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Looks to me like two holding the sign in place, two holding the ladder and one securing the sign.  Sounds reasonable to me to ensure noone gets hurt.

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12 minutes ago, Rob-M said:

Looks to me like two holding the sign in place, two holding the ladder and one securing the sign.  Sounds reasonable to me to ensure noone gets hurt.

And the 6th?

holding the spanner 🔧 

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He’s standing on the top rung!

im sure there’s usually a sticker on the second or third rung up that’s says don’t go any further. 

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1 hour ago, buccaneer66 said:

Just looks like traditional British working practice to me, you only need one worker but at least 6 gaffers.

There was a boat race between a Japanese crew and a crew from the National Health Service (UK). Both sides practised long and hard and the Japanese team won by a mile. So the NHS ...faced with this problem setup a working party which reported that the Japanese had eight people rowing and one steering and the NHS had eight people steering and one rowing.

So they brought in management consultants and the management consultants confirmed the diagnosis, suggested the NHS team be completely restructured to make it more efficient, more cohesive, streamlining and all-round better performance. A strategy document was drawn up and the recommendations encouraged restructuring for the entire organisation.

As part of the restructuring, a number of appointments were made including three Assistant Steering Managers, three Deputy Steering Managers, a Director of Steering Services and the rower was given an incentive to row harder. They had another race, this time the NHS team lost by two miles, so management laid off the rower for poor performance, sold the boat and gave the Director of steering services a large payout for making the ‘hard decisions’ and concluded they had too many management consultants and not enough managers!"
 

  • Greenie 3
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If its anything like the workers that turn up on my local canal I bet they all have a personal CRT vehicle to get to site. 

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12 hours ago, Goliath said:

He’s standing on the top rung!

im sure there’s usually a sticker on the second or third rung up that’s says don’t go any further. 

 

when I worked in construction the type of stepladder in the photo would have been described as cheaply made and for household use only (for changing light bulbs and for use by short housewives to dust the top of doors) and would have been confiscated by the site safety officer.  I would love to see CRT's safety risk assessment for the activity of fixing a sign to a post.

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Nothing new under the sun.

 

When I worked for Crown Castle we had a site meeting in the Lake District timed for 9am to look at a few sites that might be suitable for a TV relay up a valley. One of each utility for avoiding digging them up, 3 bods from Crown Castle, a legal chap and me (the ultimate site designer). All 3 Crown Castle peeps drove up from Winchester in separate cars. We all had to get up rather early to get there in time... except for the essential honcho for CC who arrived 4 hours late saying "I'm not getting up at 4am for anybody". If he'd told us that... grrr. None of the sites were suitable and we did it all again a month later.

 

I was once supplied a hire car outside my house in Ely to drive to Stanstead, a flight to Edinburgh, a hire car to Aberdeen and all back again to measure 12ft of fence. The company paying (Transco) had a local engineering office in Aberdeen about 10 minutes from the site!

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13 minutes ago, Murflynn said:

 

when I worked in construction the type of stepladder in the photo would have been described as cheaply made and for household use only (for changing light bulbs and for use by short housewives to dust the top of doors) and would have been confiscated by the site safety officer.  I would love to see CRT's safety risk assessment for the activity of fixing a sign to a post.

 

They may have done a Risk Assessment and (bearing in mind the unstable ground) concluded "can be used providing 'X' people supporting the ladder"...

 

Which goes back to the original post

  • Would I have climbed that ladder to the top with no one else around in the middle of a grassy towpath - no
  • Would I have rung my union rep / company lawyer and demanded a Cherry Picker - no
  • Would I have said "OK, provided a few of you add stability" - probably

Which is probably why I've been "not suitable" for our Fire Warden, "get job done" rather than "crossing t's"

  • Greenie 2
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1 hour ago, Murflynn said:

 

when I worked in construction the type of stepladder in the photo would have been described as cheaply made and for household use only (for changing light bulbs and for use by short housewives to dust the top of doors) and would have been confiscated by the site safety officer.  I would love to see CRT's safety risk assessment for the activity of fixing a sign to a post.

Yes they should have had a scaffolding company in to erect a scaffold to work off with hand rails and toe boards  with a Scaftag check carried out every 7 days. I can just imagine the comments and pictures of that.

 

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