Jump to content

Anything special you need to move on (for liveaboard NB)?


Featured Posts

40 minutes ago, NB Alnwick said:

 

You wouldn't expect me to agree! However, what I find remarkable is that our Honda generator is still performing well after fifteen years of regular use (often more than four hours a day) and I cannot remember hearing of many other engines lasting as well . . .

I have no generator, I don't want petrol and I don't want easily n8ckable goodies.  I have invested in a set of deep cycle agm s.... £500, for domestic Bank 1, I've been very careful of electricity usage from November 2020 to today. I use the launderette and turned off fridge.

Solar kicks in now and then, it's all systems go today! 

Link to post
Share on other sites

find a competent engineer to service your engine who doesn't mind if you watch, ask questions and take pics for future reference, along with list of filters/oil used.

 

that way you can set off with a freshly serviced engine and the knowledge of how to do it yourself the next time, you'll also know where things are on your own setup.

  • Love 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
25 minutes ago, NB Alnwick said:

 

Yes - the Wharf Inn at Fenny Compton is brilliant - there was one at the Brasenose in Cropredy but we do not know if the new operators will provide the same facility. Some marinas also advertise laundry facilities.

New operators? Have the South Efricans gone?

Link to post
Share on other sites

 

Quote
3 minutes ago, Athy said:

New operators? Have the South Efricans gone?

 

 

Yes changeover was at the end of last year . . .

Edited by NB Alnwick
Link to post
Share on other sites
4 minutes ago, NB Alnwick said:

"

New operators? Have the South Efricans gone?"

 

Yes changeover was at the end of last year . . .

We never went in there at all last year, so I wouldn't have noticed. I must say they were a mixed blessing. She seemed pleasant, if a little witchy, but I never once saw him smile. I liked their policy of having regular live music (even if "blues-rock" trios seemed to predominate) but on more than one occasion one young lady had to do both the barmaid's job and the waitressing in the restaurant. Luckily it was Holly so she coped pretty well, but there were delays and it was, in my view, a false economy.

 

I didn't know that the had a launderette; I didn't see it advertised. A pity, as we might sometimes have used it.

Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, LadyG said:

I have no generator, I don't want petrol and I don't want easily n8ckable goodies.  I have invested in a set of deep cycle agm s.... £500, for domestic Bank 1, I've been very careful of electricity usage from November 2020 to today. I use the launderette and turned off fridge.

Solar kicks in now and then, it's all systems go today! 

 

Unless you are extremely blessed by good fortune, I am guessing that like us, when you look back over more than 15 years afloat you will say: "that generator was the best thing I ever bought" - as for expensive batteries: we did go down that route ourselves and wasted a fortune. The best batteries we ever had were purchased from a forum member at £25 each - they had previously been used to provide mains power via inverters in Autoglass windscreen repair vans and the batteries were routinely discarded when they still had lots of life left. These days we use these Bosch equivalents from an eBay seller.

Link to post
Share on other sites

I forgot to add, we found this book on narrow-boat maintenance and repair handy. I believe that it borrows from what is on fellow forum member Tony Brooks' site, so you could also print off the information, but either way it's good to have a 'hard' copy due to internet connectivity issues coinciding with something going wrong.

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Narrow-Boat-Engine-Maintenance-Repair/dp/1785003496

  • Love 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
30 minutes ago, NB Alnwick said:

 

Unless you are extremely blessed by good fortune, I am guessing that like us, when you look back over more than 15 years afloat you will say: "that generator was the best thing I ever bought" - as for expensive batteries: we did go down that route ourselves and wasted a fortune. The best batteries we ever had were purchased from a forum member at £25 each - they had previously been used to provide mains power via inverters in Autoglass windscreen repair vans and the batteries were routinely discarded when they still had lots of life left. These days we use these Bosch equivalents from an eBay seller.

I am not sure, time will tell, my battery bank number number 1 is ( 3 x 135) ah, so not outrageously expensive, I bought an new 80ah starter battery via a boater who had a business, cost was about £50, and some wine, delivered and fitted. There are two more batteries which are feeding water pump and small invertor, seem to be OK. 

I'd rather visit a marina every so often to charge batteries, do laundry, shower properly, put on clean clothes and visit a pub than buy a generator with all the faff. I don't have a separate petrol locker, and I think it's a safety hazard, not to mention insurance. I won't go down that route. 

Edited by LadyG
Link to post
Share on other sites
3 minutes ago, Thomas C King said:

I forgot to add, we found this book on narrow-boat maintenance and repair handy. I believe that it borrows from what is on fellow forum member Tony Brooks' site, so you could also print off the information, but either way it's good to have a 'hard' copy due to internet connectivity issues coinciding with something going wrong.

 

https://www.amazon.co.uk/Narrow-Boat-Engine-Maintenance-Repair/dp/1785003496

 

My site: www.tb-training.co.uk

  • Greenie 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
8 minutes ago, Mad Harold said:

 

You spend a surprising amount of time on your knees on a boat!

Whilst I do love my Gardner engine, I don't go as far as praying to it.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Squeegee mop and bucket for baling the bilge, washing down the boat, mopping leaks. Nice furry blanket for sitting inside/outside on nippy nights and over the bed when required. Several pairs of industrial/gardening gloves for steering in the cold, handling mooring kit, locking through, thumping gongoozlers. Endorse overalls and head torch plus battery LED torch/lantern I/c hanging hook + magnetic base.

  • Love 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

As well as the various things already mentioned, check what cruising gear comes with the boat. Some people keep theirs to transfer onto their new boat. You don't want to sail off into the sunset after buying the boat only to find you haven't got any way of securing the boat to the bank...

 

As a minimum:

 

2 mooring pins, (4 better in case of loss),

 

Lump hammer, (2 better in case of loss),

 

2 piling hooks(4 better in case of loss) ,

 

2 goat chains(4 better in case of loss) ,

 

Small hole windlass for use on most of the canal system, (2 or more better in case of loss),

 

Large hole windlass for use on the GU mainline (2 or more better in case of loss)

 

Front and rear mooring lines.

 

Centre line (for handling the boat,  not for mooring), 2 better - one per side)

 

Long shaft,

 

Boat hook,

 

Front and rear fenders,

 

2 x side fenders 4 or 6 better)

 

Folding pruning saw to remove obstructions from the prop,

 

Bolt cutters to remove obstructions from the prop.

  • Greenie 1
  • Love 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
17 minutes ago, cuthound said:

As well as the various things already mentioned, check what cruising gear comes with the boat. Some people keep theirs to transfer onto their new boat. You don't want to sail off into the sunset after buying the boat only to find you haven't got any way of securing the boat to the bank...

 

As a minimum:

 

2 mooring pins, (4 better in case of loss),

 

Lump hammer, (2 better in case of loss),

 

2 piling hooks(4 better in case of loss) ,

 

2 goat chains(4 better in case of loss) ,

 

Small hole windlass for use on most of the canal system, (2 or more better in case of loss),

 

Large hole windlass for use on the GU mainline (2 or more better in case of loss)

 

Front and rear mooring lines.

 

Centre line (for handling the boat,  not for mooring), 2 better - one per side)

 

Long shaft,

 

Boat hook,

 

Front and rear fenders,

 

2 x side fenders 4 or 6 better)

 

Folding pruning saw to remove obstructions from the prop,

 

Bolt cutters to remove obstructions from the prop.

 

and some sort of magnet on a long cord/rope to attempt rescue of any of the above. sea searchers from chandleries are popular but if getting a modern neodymium-type make sure its not a super strong 100's of kg pull one, if it locks onto the side of the boat you're never getting it off :D 

  • Love 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
5 minutes ago, Hudds Lad said:

 

and some sort of magnet on a long cord/rope to attempt rescue of any of the above. sea searchers from chandleries are popular but if getting a modern neodymium-type make sure its not a super strong 100's of kg pull one, if it locks onto the side of the boat you're never getting it off :D 

 

I had a magnet find me when I was entering a lock back in the 90's on my first shareboat. Frightened the life out of me as it attached itself to the bottom of the boat, and kept getting pulled off a d re-attaching as the rope wrapped itself around the prop.

 

The loud clanking noise it made convinced me i had bent the prop and it was hitting something 😁.

 

Took some strength to pull it off, in fact I nearly dod a backward somersault onto the towpath when it finally came free.

  • Haha 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, cuthound said:

As well as the various things already mentioned, check what cruising gear comes with the boat. Some people keep theirs to transfer onto their new boat. You don't want to sail off into the sunset after buying the boat only to find you haven't got any way of securing the boat to the bank...

 

As a minimum:

 

2 mooring pins, (4 better in case of loss),

 

Lump hammer, (2 better in case of loss),

 

2 piling hooks(4 better in case of loss) ,

 

2 goat chains(4 better in case of loss) ,

 

Small hole windlass for use on most of the canal system, (2 or more better in case of loss),

 

Large hole windlass for use on the GU mainline (2 or more better in case of loss)

 

Front and rear mooring lines.

 

Centre line (for handling the boat,  not for mooring), 2 better - one per side)

 

Long shaft,

 

Boat hook,

 

Front and rear fenders,

 

2 x side fenders 4 or 6 better)

 

Folding pruning saw to remove obstructions from the prop,

 

Bolt cutters to remove obstructions from the prop.

+ 2 x CRT Watermate keys, to access sanitary stations and some locked locks and swing/lift bridges.

+ 2 x CRT handcuff keys to access some locked paddle gear. Check that the ones you get have a square hole in the end, and not a round couple with small square corners - the latter will not work with worn handcuff locks.

Edited by David Mack
  • Greenie 2
Link to post
Share on other sites
On 15/02/2021 at 16:21, NB Alnwick said:

 

Anyone capable of cycling 20+ miles on a daily commute should take to a boat like a duck to water . . .

 

 

aww shucks, thanks!! 😊 I am so looking forward to all the walking and cycling and systematically exploring all paths available near the canals! I'm of the firm belief that there's no bad weather, only bad gear, and I feel sorry for those who don't feel the same! After years of cycling I couldn't understand how most people complained of the weather, when their biggest experience with it is walking from the front door to the car, or the car into the supermarket... 🤷‍♀️ 

  • Greenie 1
Link to post
Share on other sites

Wow, so many amazing replies, thank you so much everyone!! Recording everything into our Google Docs, thanks again!! :D

 

Is it alright if I post here for comments a couple of NBs we are seriously considering? We feel it's come down to these two:

 

Amelia

https://www.google.com/url?q=https://narrowboats.apolloduck.co.uk/boat/walsall-boats-60-traditional-for-sale/618589&sa=D&source=editors&ust=1613508375406000&usg=AOvVaw0epDWf2tk7F9IKYa9SqWVl

Pros: think it looks quite nice inside and out, and love the dinette, but it does need some work. Most notably: internal doors installed (so we can both have online meetings simultaneously if needed); second bed removed (which means removing the pump out tank).

 

Madhatter

https://www.venetianmarina.co.uk/used-narrowboats/details/5423.aspx

(video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=12tfnesyaMQ&feature=share&fbclid=IwAR3j6Y-akB0L3EWCu1Yj3IbOuRytoxVD-fMnHC5eaoITOozR6GQ7N0xbVMY)

Pros: the layout is incredible for us - the dinette in the back is all ready to be an office, plus there's even a closet. Not to mention, but it's got a Thetford cassette so it'll be easy to convert to a composting setup, which we prefer. For work to be done however: clearly needs some work on the outside to touch up the rust (which we hear might not be too difficult to DIY it?), the shower too will need new grout and maybe tile, and you can see in the pictures the air fresheners which is a potential red flag. There's a dehumidifier in the bedroom cabin as well, and we're no strangers to dealing with excess humidity in living spaces unfortunately and that eternal quest of trying to create proper ventilation, but the marina has acknowledged that while there is water damage around the windows, most of it looks "historic" save for a window in the saloon which feels damp. We're not sure how to interpret that (ie how potentially serious it could be), but anything to do with water damage sounds like a headache. Also the keel cooled engine, which I've just been reading is not exactly ideal...

 

We have a viewing arranged for Amelia soon, but we're incredibly tempted to see if we can put in an offer conditional on survey for the Madhatter because of how quickly boats can go and we just love the layout so much. We feel strongly about both boats, although they both will need some work. Decisions decisions!  

Link to post
Share on other sites
7 minutes ago, Blob Fish said:

but it's got a Thetford cassette so it'll be easy to convert to a composting setup, which we prefer.

 

 

Just as an aside, have you been reading the thread about C&RT and composting toilets ?

 

Don't waste your money (£1000+) putting in a system which MAY become banned in the future. Live with what there is until the future plans beome clearer.

 

C&RT say don't empty your compost toilet in our bins. - General Boating - Canal World

 

Extract from C&RT email :

 

Do remember though, if you can’t keep it stored until it’s ready to use, it will still need to be disposed of in an appropriate way – for example a suitable composting site away from the canal. It should not be put in our bins – and absolutely must not be disposed of on or near the towpaths. Liquid waste can be emptied down an Elsan point.

  • The longer the better! Solid waste can take up to 12 months to compost. If you can’t store it for long enough, bin it at a suitable composting site away from the canal.
  • Greenie 1
Link to post
Share on other sites
1 minute ago, Idle Days said:

It is; after you have spent the 40k. 

 

That is not my experience, my boat costs me more per annum than my house costs me. (Both are 'paid for')

 

Boat moorings cost 2x more than house council tax

Boat fuel costs more than domestic electricity and oil (Fuel for electricity generation as well as propulsion)

Boat insurance costs more than the house insurance

Boat maintenance costs are way higher than the house maintenance costs

Marina electricity costs 25% more than my house electric.

Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.