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Ok I messed up I need a battery key


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20 minutes ago, haggis said:

I see from his profile that he is an electrical installer

 

 

That being the case, it also seems odd that he didn't have enough knowledge to know he could just 'bridge' the switch, or move one of the wires to the other side of the switch.

 

Could it have been a 'wind-up' ?

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Just now, Alan de Enfield said:

 

 

That being the case, it also seems odd that he didn't have enough knowledge to know he could just 'bridge' the switch, or move one of the wires to the other side of the switch.

 

Could it have been a 'wind-up' ?

 

Was just about to say/suggest exactly the same.

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4 hours ago, Tonka said:

We are of the same ilk having had a split charge relay failed due to stuck contacts, and a blocking diode catch fire. The off,1,both & 2 switch is far more safer and reliable.

On Mintball the domestic batteries are the ones connected directly to the alternator, with the engine battery being via the split charge relay. This means that the batteries that need the majority of the charge don't go through the relay.

1 hour ago, PD1964 said:

Yes I’ve seen this on boats where they have a 3pin plug attached to the 240v power out cable of the inverter and when on shore power it’s not used, but plug contacts exposed. Then when your disconnected from shore line you unplug the shoreline 3pin and insert the inverter 3pin into the ring main socket and switch on the master switch between inverter and battery bank. Not the best system IMO.

Ouch!!

 

We do it by having a twin switched mains outlet connected to the land line and two single sockets connected to the inverter. One line is for the fridge, the other for everything else - the reason there are two separate sockets for the inverter is that it allows us the possibility of splitting the fridge (and kitchen sockets) from the rest of the sockets and run them from a different inverter if we want to.

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1 hour ago, PD1964 said:

Yes I’ve seen this on boats where they have a 3pin plug attached to the 240v power out cable of the inverter and when on shore power it’s not used, but plug contacts exposed. Then when your disconnected from shore line you unplug the shoreline 3pin and insert the inverter 3pin into the ring main socket and switch on the master switch between inverter and battery bank. Not the best system IMO.

I was suggesting an isolator on the DC supply to the inverter, nothing to do with live 240 volt pins

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55 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

 

That being the case, it also seems odd that he didn't have enough knowledge to know he could just 'bridge' the switch, or move one of the wires to the other side of the switch.

 

Could it have been a 'wind-up' ?

Clockwork boats are the next big thing.

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1 hour ago, haggis said:

I wonder why the original poster hasn't been back, especially as Matty offered to take a key to him. I see from his profile that he is an electrical installer and if that is the case it seems odd that he didn't have a spare key on board. 

Puzzling 🙂 

haggis

I did see that yesterday when I was looking for the boat name. A 240v industrial or domestic installer probably hasnt got the first clue about 12v systems, as has been seen on some recent narrowboat credits and even new builds!!

If he comes back, I still have the same spares

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13 hours ago, ditchcrawler said:

I was suggesting an isolator on the DC supply to the inverter, nothing to do with live 240 volt pins

Yes that’s what I said the systems have, so you just unplug the land line 3pin insert the inverter 3pin and switch on the isolated between Inverter and battery’s. 

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1 hour ago, PD1964 said:

Yes that’s what I said the systems have, so you just unplug the land line 3pin insert the inverter 3pin and switch on the isolated between Inverter and battery’s. 

Why wouldn't you just switch the Inverter on/off at the erm inverter....

Couldn't be arsed personally rooting around in the engine hole to use the isolator....

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12 minutes ago, jonathanA said:

Why wouldn't you just switch the Inverter on/off at the erm inverter....

Couldn't be arsed personally rooting around in the engine hole to use the isolator....

Just another safety precaution to isolate  the DC/battery supply, inverter switches could be accidentally switched on and off, an isolation switch not so much.

  As I keep saying all boats are wired differently, a lot of boats have their isolated switches positioned so you don’t need to go into the engine bay and can be operated from the control panel  area.

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46 minutes ago, PD1964 said:

Just another safety precaution to isolate  the DC/battery supply, inverter switches could be accidentally switched on and off, an isolation switch not so much.

  As I keep saying all boats are wired differently, a lot of boats have their isolated switches positioned so you don’t need to go into the engine bay and can be operated from the control panel  area.

Absolutely correct. My boat has them situated at chest height in the designated electrics cupboard at the arse end of the boat, no bending down or going into the engine hole. There are 3 all in a nice line and proper ones from BEP. No daft plastic toggle switching.

IMG_20210125_140246.jpg

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1 hour ago, jonathanA said:

Why wouldn't you just switch the Inverter on/off at the erm inverter....

Couldn't be arsed personally rooting around in the engine hole to use the isolator....

I isolate my inverter when I leave the boat to come home

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2 minutes ago, jonathanA said:

Why ? 

 

I isolate everything except the bilge pump and the solar panel. It removes the danger of accidently leaving a load on

 

2 minutes ago, jonathanA said:

Why ? 

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 22/01/2021 at 20:06, Keeping Up said:

Quick way to do this- get some bare wire and wrap it round and round the 2 terminals. No need for any tools, just make sure you don't let the other end touch anything especially the hull. If you haven't any wire, as an emergency temporary measure use twisted kitchen foil.

don't think kitchen foil is going to take amps required for engine start! as said above put both cables on same stud until key obtained

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13 hours ago, Oddjob said:

don't think kitchen foil is going to take amps required for engine start! as said above put both cables on same stud until key obtained

I'd like to do a test on this. Clearly a single wrap of tinfoil wouldn't do it but I'd be willing to bet that if you twisted it tightly until it resembled a piece of wire, and then wrapped that round and round the two terminals of the isolator switch, it would take the required current for a short while. If it doesn't, you just need to use more!

 

But obviously, putting both cables on the same stud is a better option (if you have a suitable spanner available)

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1 hour ago, J R ALSOP said:

End of mooring spike or windlass have worked in the past for me (on other peoples boats) when having been asked if I can help.

But you have to stand and hold it there all the time the engine is running

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21 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

and buy a new alternator?  😃

Only if your alternator is not sensibly wired in order to comply with the BSS.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...
On 23/01/2021 at 14:10, Keeping Up said:

I'd be willing to bet that a tinfoil wrap would work a lot better than the cheap jump-leads that I bought from Halfrauds a few years ago!

Just a late thought, on thinking further about this. Good quality tinfoil is appatently about 0.02mm thick, so a typical 300mm width would have a cross-sectional area of 6 sq mm. I reckon that ought to be enough if the resultant twist was wrapped 3 or 4 times around the terminals.

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