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Alan de Enfield

Another case of Weil's Disease from canal water.

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15 minutes ago, Ray T said:

What ever happened to "personal responsibility?"

Water voles wouldn't be able to read the warning signs telling them not to p1ss urinate in the cut. ?

Rats could be smarter than water voles though.

Edited by Jen-in-Wellies
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6 minutes ago, Ray T said:

What ever happened to "personal responsibility?"

Completely agree, but when you are encouraging 400+ million visits per annum many of which may be visiting 'water' for the first time and are totally unaware of the 'non-obvious' dangers surely it is not unreasonable  to be warned of them.

 

If we were not informed that it was potentially dangerous to have Co producing appliances in our boats (leaky exhausts, gas appliances wrongly adjusted etc) how many would even have known what Co was ?

 

Once it becomes common knowledge then yes - you take personal responsibility based on an informed decision.

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So I gather the immersion in canal water during the clearing of props is also a hazardous business ? Might try and get some of those elbow length gloves vets wear when inspecting a cows' innards.

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10 minutes ago, colmac said:

So I gather the immersion in canal water during the clearing of props is also a hazardous business ? Might try and get some of those elbow length gloves vets wear when inspecting a cows' innards.

I use a pair of pond gloves bought from a garden centre, much more substantial, gives protection from sharps in the stuff round the prop and keeps the mitts warm for longer.

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35 minutes ago, BruceinSanity said:

I use a pair of pond gloves bought from a garden centre, much more substantial, gives protection from sharps in the stuff round the prop and keeps the mitts warm for longer.

I always try to be prepared for whatever I encounter 

 

FB_IMG_1558896894688.jpg

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Its rare but it does happen! I spent a week last month in Watford General. Thought it was flu so left it, but eventually I had to go in. They were superb BTW. But it was rough, I was properly ill. Wouldn't recommend it. DC.

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I’m torn. I think I was unlucky. I got stopped by the Trent when it was in spate. The air was moist and as it turns out it went to my lungs (I have never coughed up blood before!) fortunately I was already admitted to Watford when this happened. But I see many people in canoes and even swimming and they seem to be fine. So in my mind S#@t happens. What can I say. DC

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I do volunteer work for CR&T on the education side. We go into schools and what CR&T call "uniformed groups" such as cubs, brownies etc. We talk about water safety and one of the things we do during these sessions is warn about Weil's disease. We also carry cards that say, if we are admitted with flu like symptoms doctors are asked to check for Weil's disease, because we work around canals but we also use the cards during our water safety sessions. As said the risk is not great but it is a sigificant risk. and the disease is not only carried by rats. I don't believe that swimming in canals and rivers, or other water bodies, will ever be stopped but it is extremely important to warn of the dangers of being close to water and that does include water born diseases. I suppose that rivers are cleared fairly quickly of nasties because they flow. Most canals are more or less stagnant.

 

Unfortunately, at the moment, the water safety sessions, at least in my area seem to have come to a bit of a halt. I also think that the majority of teachers and "uniformed groups" adults do not place a huge significance on talking to their charges about water safety. Personally I think that out of all the volunteering opportunities that the Canal and River Trust have water safety is, by far, the most important. 

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Waterproof plasters for any cuts or scrapes are essential.  And the NHS link above says to keep any canal or river water out of your mouth, so don't eat bacon butties with bare hands if you haven't washed them after handling lines etc - whether they have been in the canal or just on the bank.  We tend to keep some kitchen towels handy for eating on the move.  And of course keeping the ends of the water tank hose scrupulously clean, out of the mud, and perhaps covered when not in use.

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1 hour ago, Cheese said:

   And of course keeping the ends of the water tank hose scrupulously clean, out of the mud, and perhaps covered when not in use.

And how many bother with that

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Doesnt everyone keep a container of disinfectant hand gel in the soap hole by the range?

Thats why boats were built like that.

clear prop hand gel

handle ropes hand gel

drink coffee hand gel

scratch hand immediate hand gel

Maybe its because of my ex profession

 

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1 hour ago, roland elsdon said:

Doesnt everyone keep a container of disinfectant hand gel in the soap hole by the range?

Thats why boats were built like that.

clear prop hand gel

handle ropes hand gel

drink coffee hand gel

scratch hand immediate hand gel.

Maybe its because of my ex profession

Hand-gel salesman?

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We always tell volunteers on Python about the risks at the start of the day safety briefing. We used to be able to hand out some of the CRT advice cards to those that wanted them but I have been unable to get any for a long time.

We make a point of ensuring people have washed their hands or used hang gel/hand wipes before they stop for a tea break (which often involves home made cake on Python) or lunch. We also advise people it is wise to wash their hands BEFORE going to the loo as well as after.

 

It is true that many people get some cold like symptoms and feel a little under the weather for a few days while their imuune system fights it off and they never know they have been infected. It is when your body doesn't manage to fight it off things can go very bad very quickly and as the symptoms are so easily dismissed as being cold/flu related some people don't realise the potential for it to all go horribly wrong until it is all a bit late.

 

I had a rotten cold last year mid vegetation cutting season and was urged to go to the GP. When I did she laughed at me asking when I had been drinking rat pee! I am sorry to say that I had to educate the GP - she did some research while I was in the surgery and apologised!

 

It is worth thinking, that crisp packet you so kindly picked up and put in the bin may have had some crips crumbs left in it when discarded and if the rat had a pee while nibbling at them it might not be dew/rainwater on the packet!

 

I think it is important that boaters are informed and a thread like this will help do that.

 

One thing I learned was that when you have a group of Scouts on board who have listened to what you have told them about hygiene they will line up to wash their hands before break time - 12  small people forming a queue in the tiny cabin, none of whom understand the need to conserve water on a boat and all of whom are being very diligent about thoroughly washing their hands  when you are trying to boil the kettle and get sandwich boxes out of the fridge in a VERY confined space........... there are always a lot of hand towels to wash after the Scouts join us too! :)

 

 

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3 hours ago, roland elsdon said:

Doesnt everyone keep a container of disinfectant hand gel in the soap hole by the range?

Thats why boats were built like that.

clear prop hand gel

handle ropes hand gel

drink coffee hand gel

scratch hand immediate hand gel

Maybe its because of my ex profession

 

I do now! DC

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1 hour ago, cheshire~rose said:

We always tell volunteers on Python about the risks at the start of the day safety briefing. We used to be able to hand out some of the CRT advice cards to those that wanted them but I have been unable to get any for a long time.

We make a point of ensuring people have washed their hands or used hang gel/hand wipes before they stop for a tea break (which often involves home made cake on Python) or lunch. We also advise people it is wise to wash their hands BEFORE going to the loo as well as after.

 

It is true that many people get some cold like symptoms and feel a little under the weather for a few days while their imuune system fights it off and they never know they have been infected. It is when your body doesn't manage to fight it off things can go very bad very quickly and as the symptoms are so easily dismissed as being cold/flu related some people don't realise the potential for it to all go horribly wrong until it is all a bit late.

 

I had a rotten cold last year mid vegetation cutting season and was urged to go to the GP. When I did she laughed at me asking when I had been drinking rat pee! I am sorry to say that I had to educate the GP - she did some research while I was in the surgery and apologised!

 

It is worth thinking, that crisp packet you so kindly picked up and put in the bin may have had some crips crumbs left in it when discarded and if the rat had a pee while nibbling at them it might not be dew/rainwater on the packet!

 

I think it is important that boaters are informed and a thread like this will help do that.

 

One thing I learned was that when you have a group of Scouts on board who have listened to what you have told them about hygiene they will line up to wash their hands before break time - 12  small people forming a queue in the tiny cabin, none of whom understand the need to conserve water on a boat and all of whom are being very diligent about thoroughly washing their hands  when you are trying to boil the kettle and get sandwich boxes out of the fridge in a VERY confined space........... there are always a lot of hand towels to wash after the Scouts join us too! :)

 

 

Last night I was at a small local event, music and seasonal readings, one of which was an extract from the William stories in which William heard a sermon by the Curate who preached in hell fire terms 'tell the truth at all times'. Alas, William took that too literally and you can image the mayhem thus created, especially with somewhat older female relatives conscious about their appearance!

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A couple or three years ago I came across Spray Skin, posted a comment on here about it, a good thing, wash graze or cut, seal it with spray skin. Better than plasters which get in the way and come off. Could help against weils disease.

Of course the old grumpfuttocks of analworld (i must fix that intermittent fault on the "see") came out in droves, saying how hard they were, only washing their hands while having a pee and drying on their beards, denigrating it as useless newfangled nonsense. 

I have a can in each first aid kit, home, car, boat and rucsac. 

Edited by Jim Riley

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2 minutes ago, Jim Riley said:

.........… saying how hard they were, only washing their hands while having a pee ………...

During officer training at Cranwell we were taught not to pee on our fingers.

 

The difference between the RAF & the 'mud pluggers' I guess.

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1 minute ago, Alan de Enfield said:

During officer training at Cranwell we were taught not to pee on our fingers.

 

The difference between the RAF & the 'mud pluggers' I guess.

Reminds me of the Churchill quote

Young man [after seeing Churchill leave the bathroom without washing his hands]: At Eton, they taught us to wash our hands after using the toilet.
Churchill: At Harrow, they taught us not to piss on our hands.

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3 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

During officer training at Cranwell we were taught not to pee on our fingers.

 

The difference between the RAF & the 'mud pluggers' I guess.

Urine is sterile, you'd be better off peeing on your fingers than washing them in dirty water or wiping them on a dirty cloth...

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Absolutely, I am a firm beliver that the cleanest thing in any given public washroom is my tackle!

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