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Vintage Engines: Which ones are the simplest to maintain?


anniedesigner
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I'm sorry - this is nonsense. Most 'vintage engines need the same as a modern on - oil and filter changes. Except they are easier to access. And often don't have filters

 

A service on something like a Gardner or a JP is much easier than on a Beta

 

Richard

Why is it easier then on the Beta Tug Engine in an engine room

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Any vintage engine in good condition will 'start on the button' in cold weather. If it doesn't, it's knackered.

 

 

Couldn't agree more.

My Kelvin was always a bit difficult to start in cold weather. However, after new rings and pistons it always starts first go, so I fitted this starter button smile.png.

post-5123-0-06215700-1446483389_thumb.jpg

  • Greenie 2
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Couldn't agree more.

My Kelvin was always a bit difficult to start in cold weather. However, after new rings and pistons it always starts first go, so I fitted this starter button smile.png.

Brilliant! I've seen boats with 'bus windows but never on with a 'bus bell-push! Have a green entertainment award.

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Couldn't agree more.

My Kelvin was always a bit difficult to start in cold weather. However, after new rings and pistons it always starts first go, so I fitted this starter button smile.png.

 

Thinking alike that was exactly the OTT start button I intended to fit but settled for this one instead smile.png

 

IMG_3558.JPG

 

 

Typically I press the button for a second or less, release it then wait for engine to start wink.png

Edited by by'eck
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Gardner 2LW here. No key. No preheat. No need to adjust throttle.

 

I just flick a switch then the starter button. If very cold, depress the cold start latch first which automatically unlatches when it fires up.

Edited by mark99
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Misery guts here -

A 'vintage engine' is a joy, god wot, but the OP is a newbie, wants easy maintenance, has said nothing about any desire to polish and of the suggested engines (they must be polished, kept shining - for the delectation of Lesser mortals - like wot I am).

for a beginner the manipulation of speed wheels and gear selector rods may be a challenge too far... Unless of course she takes on board the differences and accepts those(so called) disadvantages.

That's a whole lot more than ease of maintenance. Still I wouldn't want to dissuade her.

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Couldn't agree more.

My Kelvin was always a bit difficult to start in cold weather. However, after new rings and pistons it always starts first go, so I fitted this starter button smile.png.

 

post-5123-0-06215700-1446483389_thumb.jp

 

Love it! My dad got one of those and installed it as a doorbell.

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Misery guts here -

A 'vintage engine' is a joy, god wot, but the OP is a newbie, wants easy maintenance, has said nothing about any desire to polish and of the suggested engines (they must be polished, kept shining - for the delectation of Lesser mortals - like wot I am).

for a beginner the manipulation of speed wheels and gear selector rods may be a challenge too far... Unless of course she takes on board the differences and accepts those(so called) disadvantages.

That's a whole lot more than ease of maintenance. Still I wouldn't want to dissuade her.

 

 

Once again I disagree with you. A Gardner LW for example commonly has a PRM260 transmission so can be controlled with the same Morse/Teleflex single lever control universally used with modern buzzy engines.

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Vintage engines and simple maintenance don't tend to go hand in hand. It also depends on what you class as 'simple'.

 

 

I think you are confusing maintenance with repairing.

 

The OP asked about maintenance. Maintaining a vintage engine is much the same as a modern engine but usually easier and simpler because access is better.

 

Fixing the pesky things when they break is a different kettle of fish. I can't call Gleniffer or Skandia for new big end shells like if I had a Beta (even a BD3!) as those manufacturers no longer exist. Getting spares is a whole nother level of complication.

Edited by Mike the Boilerman
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Once again I disagree with you. A Gardner LW for example commonly has a PRM260 transmission so can be controlled with the same Morse/Teleflex single lever control universally used with modern buzzy engines.

 

 

Well you usually do.....

To my mind, if you're going to have a trad engine then you're honour bound to do the full monty. Heavens - its like having an Edwardian car and chroming the radiator....

 

So too keep you happy, perhaps I should say something like " a trad engine may well have a speed wheel and lever controls, which you may find daunting at first "

Gardner

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=14fl6smwZJw

 

 

Lister

 

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vak6DaNWI3A

 

 

(some may object over the choice of example video's! smile.png )

Gardner - lovely

 

Lister - for heavens sake don't put the lady off completely.

Water cooled Listers are lovely.

 

 

Yep count me as one wink.png Try this as a replacement

 

 

Now that's what I mean as a slow canter.....

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To my mind, if you're going to have a trad engine then you're honour bound to do the full monty.

 

Our trad engine has the full morsy. As neither of us has three hands, we decided against a speedwheel & push-pull set-up. I wouldn't mind having a go on someone else's to see what it's like, but I'm content with the single-lever "Morse" control on Trojan.

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Our trad engine has the full morsy. As neither of us has three hands, we decided against a speedwheel & push-pull set-up. I wouldn't mind having a go on someone else's to see what it's like, but I'm content with the single-lever "Morse" control on Trojan.

 

Once you get used to the twin wheel/lever arrangement it becomes quicker to operate than a Morse setup. Particularly appropriate to a vintage diesel charging batteries whilst operating locks, as the speedwheel allows easy adjustment of idle revs.

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Where are you going with this? Will you buy a boat with a Lister and swap it for a Kelvin? No, you'll stick with the engine in the boat. Buy a boat that you like, you'll learn to live with it

 

Richard

I like that, I fancy a RN or a Gardner 3 cylinder to replace my BD3, but the BD3 set up works, I may be mucking about for years with a RN or Gardner.

I know it's probably not vintage but I am a big fan of our easily maintained 1970s twin pot Sabb. Starts easily, sounds lovely and is powerful enough for the canals and rivers in our 57ft boat.

I missed out on one of those, The chap sold it to a scrapy for £100

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Once you get used to the twin wheel/lever arrangement it becomes quicker to operate than a Morse setup. Particularly appropriate to a vintage diesel charging batteries whilst operating locks, as the speedwheel allows easy adjustment of idle revs.

Agree, don't have a vintage engine but do have a speed wheel and a push/pull

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Our trad engine has the full morsy. As neither of us has three hands, we decided against a speedwheel & push-pull set-up. I wouldn't mind having a go on someone else's to see what it's like, but I'm content with the single-lever "Morse" control on Trojan.

Three hands? We manage perfectly well using one hand on Fulbourne's gear wheel and speed wheel, with the other hand on the tiller.

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