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Being fit for canals with a brain injury


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4 hours ago, TheBiscuits said:

Paying thousands of pounds to pootle along a shallow muddy ditch?  Maybe a brain injury would help!

 

 

Yes - come along down to the Thames which is a bit wider and deeper and the locks are (sometimes) operated by uniformed flunkies...

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9 minutes ago, Athy said:

Has it occurred to anyone that the O.P., whose first post this is, may be suffering from such an injury?

 

As No1 Son has had a brain tumour and surgery to remove it (then Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy) and does sometimes have problems , indeed I did, consider this - which is why I did a Google search For Biu / BIU etc to see if anything anywhere near relevant to the title came up, and no it didn't, hence my post of a ? (asking for more detail)

 

Edit to Add :

BIU = "Bold, Italic & Underline" or

BIU = British Independant Utilities or

BIU = Beat It Up (urban slang)

Edited by Alan de Enfield
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10 hours ago, TheBiscuits said:

Paying thousands of pounds to pootle along a shallow muddy ditch?  Maybe a brain injury would help!

 

 

If the OP has a brain injury then he or she has my sympathy.

I largely agree with Mr Biscuits that we as boaters must be fairly thick to pay lots of money to pootle along shallow,dirty canals suffering from no maintainance with lock paddles that just about bust your gut,and strain your back.

Three examples,although there are many more; bottom paddles lock 2 Huddersfield Broad,Cromwell lock C+H has only one paddle working and takes about thirty minutes to fill (it was the same last summer when I went through).

Forty eight hours notice to use lock 1E on the HNC CRT say "to manage water levels"  what they really mean is we can't be bothered to fix the leak in the first pound.

Add in collapsing canal walls lock landings too shallow to use and really we must be a fairly dense lot.😃

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5 hours ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

As No1 Son has had a brain tumour and surgery to remove it (then Radiotherapy and Chemotherapy) and does sometimes have problems , indeed I did, consider this - which is why I did a Google search For Biu / BIU etc to see if anything anywhere near relevant to the title came up, and no it didn't, hence my post of a ? (asking for more detail)

 

Edit to Add :

BIU = "Bold, Italic & Underline" or

BIU = British Independant Utilities or

BIU = Beat It Up (urban slang)

Blood in Urine?

Brain injury unit ?

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6 hours ago, Athy said:

Has it occurred to anyone that the O.P., whose first post this is, may be suffering from such an injury?

Have a virtual greenie Sir.   Going by the comments no it hasn't crossed many minds.

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3 minutes ago, John Keaveney said:

I'm the person asking if I'm OK to tiller a boat with a brain injury 

Bui was a mistake 

Suppose it depends on your "injury" and its severity.

I have terminal brain tumours and have to make my own sensible decision as to when I stop cruising.

Are you allowed to drive a vehicle on the road?

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If you feel confident enough to steer a boat, I would say go ahead and do it. Yes, the risk of something bad happening is perhaps slightly increased, but then lots of other things can increase the risk as well (drink, distraction from children or animals etc.) At canal speeds you are unlikely to cause or come to any significant harm.

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Just now, John Keaveney said:

No I'm classed as an epileptic even though I've only had 2 seizures in six years and I'm stable with keppra anti seizure meds. 

Taking a sensible approach, being unaccompanied on any boat is probably a risk not worth taking.

Could I suggest that you get an engine  cut out key fitted and attached to yourself when steering alone so that if you fall off you have less chance of being chopped in the propeller?

A canal boat with a stopped engine will not get far un-steered nor should it do any appreciable damage.

 

Its your decision unless a medic says otherwise but what about your insurance company's view? You need to ask them.

 

I can understand your desire to be as normal as possible but you owe it to everyone else around you to not cause them any danger even if you accept the risk to your person.

Can you get or have you a partner to accompany you?

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