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16 minutes ago, Loddon said:

Never manually turn mine off, if it's warm enough it doesn't come on, controlled by a thermostat. ?

 

 

Ours, too, is thermostatically controlled. But we switch it off completely in the summer months. Let's put it another way: by this time of year it's usually, though still nominally on, cutting in much less frequently than it would earlier in the year, but this year that has not been so.

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24 minutes ago, Jen-in-Wellies said:

You want 10g less chutney in the jar? ?

In a word yes.    If the measurements were sensible you would easily notice when manufacturers tried to .  sneakily reduce the weight and charge the same price. 

 

With a number like 360g you might a couple of months ago have been getting 370 or 380 for the same price.

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22 minutes ago, Jerra said:

In a word yes.    If the measurements were sensible you would easily notice when manufacturers tried to .  sneakily reduce the weight and charge the same price. 

 

With a number like 360g you might a couple of months ago have been getting 370 or 380 for the same price.

350g is sensible in base ten. For inbred people with six fingers, then base six, or twelve is sensible. The 360g jars aren't filled in Norfolk by any chance? ?

stealth price rises are an evil marketing ploy. Loath it and its practitioners.

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2 hours ago, Loddon said:

Never manually turn mine off, if it's warm enough it doesn't come on, controlled by a thermostat. ?

 

 

Marvelous these modern control systems. Mine will actually come on every day at 11pm for a short time, unless its 21 deg at that time of night. This ensures the pump and motorised valves move every day. When I was on the tools a stuck circulation pump in the Autumn was a regular fault on central heating systems.

1 hour ago, Jen-in-Wellies said:

  The 360g jars aren't filled in Norfolk by any chance? ?

 

I thought personal insults weren't allowed on this forum

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2 hours ago, Jerra said:

In a word yes.    If the measurements were sensible you would easily notice when manufacturers tried to .  sneakily reduce the weight and charge the same price. 

 

With a number like 360g you might a couple of months ago have been getting 370 or 380 for the same price.

By coincidence this just came up on FB 

image.png.da75c867337e584e482c5f366366d844.png

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12 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

Marvelous these modern control systems. Mine will actually come on every day at 11pm for a short time, unless its 21 deg at that time of night. This ensures the pump and motorised valves move every day. When I was on the tools a stuck circulation pump in the Autumn was a regular fault on central heating systems.

I thought personal insults weren't allowed on this forum

 

 

Give him 6-fingers !!

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31 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

I thought personal insults weren't allowed on this forum

It is an ethnic smear on the population of an entire county. Hardly personal. If I said Joe Blogs of Norwich has a family tree that doesn't branch, then that would be personal.

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At least Sainsburys still sell their own brand jam in 1lb (454g) jars. I haven't bought Robinsons on principle since they reduced their jar size. 

 

When we took a week's holiday in Switzerland in the years B.C. (before children), bottled beer from the local brewery came in 1 imperial pint bottles (actually labelled 570ml, less than 0.4% different from 568ml). 

 

 

 

Edited by Ronaldo47
typo
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18 minutes ago, Machpoint005 said:

And there was me thinking Robinsons was a brewery. 

:clapping:

Just the thought of their beer sends Chivers down my spine.

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22 minutes ago, cuthound said:

 

Does their beer taste like barley water? ??

 

I wouldn't know. I don't drink barley water, whatever that is.

Not that you'll ever have tasted a decent pint of Robbies down there in Staffordshire. It doesn't seem to travel well.

 

 

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8 hours ago, ditchcrawler said:

Marvelous these modern control systems. Mine will actually come on every day at 11pm for a short time, unless its 21 deg at that time of night. This ensures the pump and motorised valves move every day. When I was on the tools a stuck circulation pump in the Autumn was a regular fault on central heating systems.

 

Thats a good thought, how long is a short time? Minimum I can set is 15 minutes.

I have had one MV die but it was the electrical side :(

 

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6 minutes ago, Machpoint005 said:

 

I wouldn't know. I don't drink barley water, whatever that is.

Not that you'll ever have tasted a decent pint of Robbies down there in Staffordshire. It doesn't seem to travel well.

 

 

 

 

images (1).jpeg

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49 minutes ago, Loddon said:

Thats a good thought, how long is a short time? Minimum I can set is 15 minutes.

I have had one MV die but it was the electrical side :(

 

I have a programable stat but also the system has an old fashioned programmer for heating on times, hot water X times a day etc. so the thermostat comes on for an hour at 11pm asking for 21 deg and then the programmer goes off at 11-15pm. so it gets 15 minutes.

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48 minutes ago, ditchcrawler said:

I have a programable stat but also the system has an old fashioned programmer for heating on times, hot water X times a day etc. so the thermostat comes on for an hour at 11pm asking for 21 deg and then the programmer goes off at 11-15pm. so it gets 15 minutes.

I might add 15 minutes, not sure at what time but it wont be late like yours it might wake me up ;)

 

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1 hour ago, ditchcrawler said:

I have a programable stat but also the system has an old fashioned programmer for heating on times, hot water X times a day etc. so the thermostat comes on for an hour at 11pm asking for 21 deg and then the programmer goes off at 11-15pm. so it gets 15 minutes.

Having just had my new one installed, I have to say every day is a school day with it:huh: (it would be fair to say I don't really know what I am doing, the old one was much simpler). All I do know is that there is a thermostat on the combi boiler itself so that if the returning water is above a given set temperature is shuts off, there is a Thermostatic radiator valve on each radiator and finally there is a thermostat in the hall set at 20 degrees. It all seems to work, the hot water is just heated like an old Ascot heater so there is no hot water tank to heat.

 

The only criticism I'd have of the old system (besides having been installed in 1980 so the boiler itself is no longer on the boiler database) is the annual problem you identified, the stuck circulation pump every autumn, usually rectified with a clout from a rubber mallet:D. Sadly it had to go because the flue was no longer legal and no-one would therefore service it (it hasn't been serviced since about 2011).

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Circulating pumps usually have a removable plug so you can turn the rotor shaft using a flat bladed screwdriver if it gets stuck. Of course, you do need to close the isolating valves on both sides of the pump first. Sticking usually only affects what used to be the more usual systems where the hot water uses gravity circulation and the pump is only used for the rads.

 

Our central heating is fully pumped, and uses a three-position, two-way valve to direct the circulating heated  water to the rads, the tank, or both simultaneously. As the pump is required for heating hot water, we never have problems with it sticking. The system is to one of the standard Honeywell designs where the pump is wired in parallel with the boiler and so runs continuously when the programmer selects heating or heating plus hot water. Pump and boiler are controlled by the tank  thermostat when hot water only  is selected.   In Heating plus HW mode, the tank thermostat controls the 3-way valve to cut off circulation to the tank when the water is hot enough.  My understanding is that it is starting and stopping that is largely responsible for wear in pump bearings, so running continuously when in heating mode is beneficial. All rads except the bathroom one have thermostatic valves, and the pump is in the airing cupboard, so its waste heat is not wasted. Our current pump is now more than 15 years old and still going strong, and the previous one only failed because the gasket at the rotor inspection cover leaked and water got into the windings and caused a short. 

 

 

 

Edited by Ronaldo47
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11 minutes ago, Ronaldo47 said:

Circulating pumps usually have a removable plug so you can turn the rotor shaft using a flat bladed screwdriver if it gets stuck. Of course, you do need to close the isolating valves on both sides of the pump first.

In my experience it only dribbles a bit if you leave the isolating valves open - I'm not at all sure my isolating valves would actually seal.

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Thanks for that, I have never dared trying to do it without closing the valves first, if only for fear of dropping the cap into somewhere inaccessible or finding its sealing washer disintegrated. Ours never needs doing,  but I have fixed stuck pumps for relatives. Theirs have been older systems with discrete gate valves either side of the pump unions. 

 

 

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10 hours ago, Tonka said:

Only 26 days until the longest day then its downhill to winter.

 

Hark at you lot with modern central heating with thermostats.

Our house came with a zoned central heating system with fully programmable timer and thermostat. Works great when we know we are going to be at home. But now that we have the van we really need to think about getting Hive or similar fitted so that we can control the heating when we are not at home and avoid wasting gas by heating the home when we are not there. 

 

The van is better set up than the house in that respect. It is fully controllable with thermostat and timer but can also be adjusted via bluetooth when in range or via text message if out and about away from the van, your smart phone acting as a remote control for the heating and hot water. It will also tell your phone the tank levels and battery voltage and charge/discharge. A handy piece of kit now that we have it set up.

 

It's almost a full month to the longest day yet. Less of the pessimism. 

8 hours ago, Ronaldo47 said:

Circulating pumps usually have a removable plug so you can turn the rotor shaft using a flat bladed screwdriver if it gets stuck. Of course, you do need to close the isolating valves on both sides of the pump first. Sticking usually only affects what used to be the more usual systems where the hot water uses gravity circulation and the pump is only used for the rads.

 

Our central heating is fully pumped, and uses a three-position, two-way valve to direct the circulating heated  water to the rads, the tank, or both simultaneously. As the pump is required for heating hot water, we never have problems with it sticking. The system is to one of the standard Honeywell designs where the pump is wired in parallel with the boiler and so runs continuously when the programmer selects heating or heating plus hot water. Pump and boiler are controlled by the tank  thermostat when hot water only  is selected.   In Heating plus HW mode, the tank thermostat controls the 3-way valve to cut off circulation to the tank when the water is hot enough.  My understanding is that it is starting and stopping that is largely responsible for wear in pump bearings, so running continuously when in heating mode is beneficial. All rads except the bathroom one have thermostatic valves, and the pump is in the airing cupboard, so its waste heat is not wasted. Our current pump is now more than 15 years old and still going strong, and the previous one only failed because the gasket at the rotor inspection cover leaked and water got into the windings and caused a short. 

 

 

 

Your system sounds very similar to what we had in our old house. It was a very reliable system. We had to have one motorised valve replaced in the 13 years we lived there, although when we moved the pump had started to get noisy so was ready for replacing. The boiler, a Potterton Suprima installed in 1992 according to the stickers on the unit, was still plodding on and was surprisingly economical for an older unit. Our gas bills were not massive.

 

Mind you our gas bills in comparison are tiny now even though this house is bigger and detached.

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23 minutes ago, Naughty Cal said:

 

 

It's almost a full month to the longest day yet. Less of the pessimism. 

 

Quite so - and when the sun does start to set earlier, you don't really notice until the end of July. So we've got two months of lovely light evenings to look forward to.

 

I've just noticed your new avatar. Has the 'van got a name?

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2 hours ago, Athy said:

Quite so - and when the sun does start to set earlier, you don't really notice until the end of July. So we've got two months of lovely light evenings to look forward to.

 

I've just noticed your new avatar. Has the 'van got a name?

Van

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