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Ronaldo47

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About Ronaldo47

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    Essex
  • Occupation
    Retired

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  1. This post cannot be displayed because it is in a forum which requires at least 10 posts to view.
  2. My understanding from a course on law I attended many years ago is that you are entitled to make use of water that seeps through the ground onto your property, regardless of where it may have seeped from. It is different if you dig a hole and then make a physical connection to a waterway so that the hole is not filled by seepage, but after the event and in the absence of evidence, how to prove where the water came from? They would surely only be entitled to compensation for the value of the water extracted, it would not make the water-filled area part of their property.
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  4. There was a lot of metric madness around in the early 1970's. A friend working for the CEGB mentioned that the dimensions of the generating hall of his power station were now expressed in millimeters. The metric version of an electronics catalogue had a metricated technical data section in which most of the original numbers had been multiplied by 25.4. This included Pi, stated to have a value in the metric system of 79.97. The metric edition of a book on plumbing, expressed pressures in so many 454 grams per 654.16 square millimeters, and described a cold water tank of approximately (!) 181.838 litres capacity. Companies found that UK manufacturers were no longer supplying steel rod in the inch dimensions they needed to maintain older equipment, and had to get it from companies in mainland Europe. Plessey (for whom I was working at the time) produced an amended design of cabinet for their radio equipment that was widely used in airports, in which the original Unified (inch) fasteners were replaced by metric. Their european customers asked them to supply the original design: due to the universal use of American Unified screw threads in the aviation industry, they only carried Inch-dimension fasteners and didn't want the hassle of having to buy and stock metric fasteners. Even today, the nominal sizes of the display screens used in TVs, computers, and motor vehicles are normally expressed as so many inches (pouce, zoll, pulgada, and pollice in France, Germany, Spain and Italy respectively).
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  6. In principle, the only additional cost should have been the thermostatic valves themselves which allow independent control of each room, but I also needed a new programmer and 3-position valve. No point heating rooms you don't use. The system is in fact one of the standard Honeywell heating plans described in one of their leaflets that you used to be able to pick up from any decent heating and plumbing supplies shop. The original system in our house seemed to have been designed and installed by North Thames Gas, evidently by graduates of the cowboy school of plumbing. It had a simple two-way diverter valve that meant the boiler could either heat the hot water tank or the house, but not both simultaneously. WIth a 12kW boiler and hot water tank only capable of absorbing heat at a rate of 3kW, when heating water, the boiler was only firing up 25% of the time, meaning that as soon as you drew off some hot water, the house started to cool down until the water was up to temperature: there was no facility to disable hot water heating. In accordance with the Honeywell information, I fitted a 3 position valve and new programmer that allowed simultaneous hot water and heating, fitted thermostatic rad valves and binned the wall thermostat. Modern Railways did a detailed article on Western Region's Intercity 125 cylinder head problem and its solution in the 1980's.
  7. My understanding is that the vast majority of wear in an engine, happens when it is started. To maximise the life of a diesel engine, it is best to keep it ticking over at constant speed and avoid unnecessary stopping and starting. The Napier engines fitted to the Intercity 125 trains were basically marine engines, designed be run at constant revs for hours on end. The original Intercity 125 design concept was for express trains that would likewise run for long distances without stopping. When they were used on Western Region, they started to be used on services with relatively frequent stops, and the thermal stresses caused by frequent alternations between running flat out and tickover at stations, lead to cylinder head leakage, necessitating a revised cylinder head design that could cope with the frequent thermal expansions and contractions. I applied the same principle when designing my central heating system, where the pump runs continuously in heating mode during the timed heating cycle. Every room has its own thermostatic radiator valve,,so there is no wall thermostat. Our present pump is more than 15 years old, and is used daily throughout the year as our hot water cylinder is also pumped. The pump is in the airing cupboard, so the small amount of electricity consumed, helps to keep the cupboard warm. The previous pump only failed after a similar service life because the "O" ring seal of the rotor inspection plug failed, allowing water to get into the motor windings and cause a short circuit.
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  14. Of course, we are now in the week with the longest hours of daylight, and have ideal weather for solar panel charging.
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