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23 minutes ago, Alan de Enfield said:

 

 

But, it is a good job he 'squirreled' away those nut removing tools - "squirrel poo, a Hazelnut in every bite!"

So many questions and none I want an answer to

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7 hours ago, Bee said:

I knew I was right to keep all my Whitworth spanners. We will once again lead the world in baffling drill sizes, rounded off nuts and Austin Allegros.

So was I, but then with a Perkins 4108M and PRM, BS and Unified are essential, although the 13mm ratchet spanner comes in awful handy on alternator adjustment. 

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On 22/05/2021 at 00:07, Athy said:

Yes, 20 = 68 and 0 = 32 are my other points of reference.

I've never understood why, when metric temperature measurements became more widespread in the U.K., somehow "centigrade", which perfectly describes the system, was replaced by "celsius" which doesn't. The French have always called it celsius, so perhaps it's something which we imported from the E.U.

16 = 61 and is the transition between coolish and warmish, adding or removing an outer clothing layer.

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On 21/05/2021 at 18:21, ditchcrawler said:

Bet you still want a pint in your pot and not 330ml

 

Quite happy with half a litre, thanks - that's what you get for a "pint", which includes the head.

 

 

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On 22/05/2021 at 09:01, Bee said:

>>We will once again lead the world in baffling drill sizes,<<

 

To be fair, the American aerospace industry is at least partly to blame. It helps if you can tell at a glance whether 11/16ths is bigger or smaller than 19/32nds. I can't, but drill sizes in millimetres are dead easy.

 

 

 

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2 hours ago, Machpoint005 said:

 

To be fair, the American aerospace industry is at least partly to blame. It helps if you can tell at a glance whether 11/16ths is bigger or smaller than 19/32nds. I can't, but drill sizes in millimetres are dead easy.

 

 

 

Do you mean by eye? No I probably couldn't. But it's blatantly obvious that 11/16ths is bigger, as it's 22/32nds.

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47 minutes ago, Athy said:

Do you mean by eye? No I probably couldn't. But it's blatantly obvious that 11/16ths is bigger, as it's 22/32nds.

 

Perhaps not the best example, but nevertheless, you have to think about it. Millimetric drill sizes are just obvious.

 

I probably could tell by eye, but by that time, how many wrong ones have I taken out of the box?

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36 minutes ago, Machpoint005 said:

 

Perhaps not the best example, but nevertheless, you have to think about it. Millimetric drill sizes are just obvious.

 

I probably could tell by eye, but by that time, how many wrong ones have I taken out of the box?

Yes I have to think about it a lot ! and much happier with the metric system. I can barely use imperial tools without a calculator to convert to metric. I learned the metric system at school ~60 years ago so I think it is time to send my dad's old stuff to the tip.

  • Greenie 2
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12 minutes ago, PaulD said:

Yes I have to think about it a lot ! and much happier with the metric system. I can barely use imperial tools without a calculator to convert to metric. I learned the metric system at school ~60 years ago so I think it is time to send my dad's old stuff to the tip.

No dont. If you buy an old engine you will need those imperial spanners

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19 minutes ago, PaulD said:

Yes I have to think about it a lot ! and much happier with the metric system. I can barely use imperial tools without a calculator to convert to metric. I learned the metric system at school ~60 years ago so I think it is time to send my dad's old stuff to the tip.

 

You and me both! 

 

6 minutes ago, Tonka said:

No dont. If you buy an old engine you will need those imperial spanners

 

...a very old engine! Old Japanese tractor engines are all metric. 

 

I have a non-metric spanner in my toolbox. It's for the drain plug on my PRM gearbox, and I  have no idea what size it is. I don't need to know because it's the only one that doesn't  say mm on it. 

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6 minutes ago, Tonka said:

No dont. If you buy an old engine you will need those imperial spanners

OK will keep them for now. We might anyway have to convert back to imperial to get a trade deal with USA. I worked for a US company and I remember getting shipping documents for some 600m wide crawler track pads!

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35 minutes ago, PaulD said:

Yes I have to think about it a lot ! and much happier with the metric system. I can barely use imperial tools without a calculator to convert to metric. I learned the metric system at school ~60 years ago so I think it is time to send my dad's old stuff to the tip.

I am the opposite!

I can visualise sizes and distances much easier in imperial.

Metric,I have to get my ready reckoner out,or look on a tape measure that has feet and inches on one side,and centimetres on the other.

Bring back fathoms,furlongs,and hogsheads and proper tons!

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1 hour ago, Mad Harold said:

Bring back fathoms,furlongs,and hogsheads and proper tons!

You have missed out the rod, pole or perch, not to mention cubits and spans, then of course there is the ell.

 

All nice logical measurements e.g. a rod pole or perch was 5½ yards.   Nowhere near as difficult as the metric system was it.

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1 hour ago, Ex Brummie said:

Can I still get 18mm  8' x 4' Sheets?  

That highlights a very important principle of the metrication board at the time: only quite dimension in metric when they really are not just an approx conversion from the original imperial dimensions. Initially the wood sheet manufacturers could adjust the thickness to a required metric size but not the widths. Things change over time, some more slowly than others - see the imperial dinosaurs! And some things are specified by law, which changes even slower.

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In 1969 I started my apprenticeship and a very nice Mr Ratcliffe at Poole Technical College told me that after 1971 I would never use imperial tools or measurement again.

I retired in September 2019 after 50 years in aircraft engineering and was still using AF spanners and occationally even Whitworth ones on some pipe fittings.

Some rivets had gone metric but even then they were really imperial as in 3.2 mm (1/8in), 4mm (5/32in) 4.8mm (3/16).

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