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Trad stern query


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Having only experience of cruiser and semi-trad sterned boats, we’re intrigued as to how those with a trad cruise in the rain.

Obviously being shareboaters our time onboard is finite, we have to have the boat in a certain place for a certain time no matter what the weather is doing, and to be honest slightly enjoy it. But in our slow search for our own boat we are starting to lean more from semi-trad towards the looks and practicality of a trad and just wondered how those of you with them get on in the rain, is it just as simple as pulling the hatch shut and reaching under for the controls?

 

In normal times i’d just mither anyone we bumped into on the cut, but as it’s looking like the back end of July could be our first and only week out this year (covid permitting) the better half wants answers on a shorter timescale so here we are :D 

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4 minutes ago, Laurie Booth I.S.M. said:

Yep

 

It is just as simple as pulling the hatch shut and reaching under for the controls.

And closing the doors behind you. Nice and cosy - even if the stove isn't lit, you should get plenty of heat from the engine if the side doors are closed.

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15 minutes ago, Hudds Lad said:

Having only experience of cruiser and semi-trad sterned boats, we’re intrigued as to how those with a trad cruise in the rain.

Obviously being shareboaters our time onboard is finite, we have to have the boat in a certain place for a certain time no matter what the weather is doing, and to be honest slightly enjoy it. But in our slow search for our own boat we are starting to lean more from semi-trad towards the looks and practicality of a trad and just wondered how those of you with them get on in the rain, is it just as simple as pulling the hatch shut and reaching under for the controls?

 

In normal times i’d just mither anyone we bumped into on the cut, but as it’s looking like the back end of July could be our first and only week out this year (covid permitting) the better half wants answers on a shorter timescale so here we are :D 

 

Cue the howls of derision from the 'traditionalists'........

 

(not my boat or pic.)

 

 

trad stern hood.JPG

Edited by The Happy Nomad
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The benefit of a trad stern is the ability to pull the doors round and the slide over to help keep warm and dry. Even better if you have a back cabin with a stove to light as you get good heat and it dries your trousers after you've been out working a lock.

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Just now, Hudds Lad said:

think thats the concern really, where do you stand if it’s all closed up, as obviously not keen to be in tiller arc.

 

On the step.  It's where you should steer from anyway, rain or shine.

 

You don't fully close the slide, just pull it up to your belly.

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2 minutes ago, Hudds Lad said:

think thats the concern really, where do you stand if it’s all closed up, as obviously not keen to be in tiller arc.

On the step seen on the left of the picture, some modern trads with the engine in the back don't have a step though. 

FB_IMG_1551343067083.jpg

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3 minutes ago, Hudds Lad said:

i should just get the wife to sign up, every time i relay info across i’m being met by a “yes, but…” 😆

 

it would be a modern trad so no back cabin with stove

 

You'll be stood on the boards over the engine then, so still nice and warm with dry legs.

 

Some boatbuilders provide a larger slide so you can both stand inside.  

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Having a really waterproof full set of wet weather gear helps a lot. We have ex-RN and RAF goretex kit and if it's really tissing it down, a set of RN foul weather kit as well. Such stuff occasiomaly appears on Ebay...

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Just now, Alan de Enfield said:

 

I always considered making a canoe skirt to fit around the hatch-opening.

Saw one in use and it looked good but never proceeded to the next stage.

 

 

Waterproof Kayak Canoe Boat Spray Skirt Deck Adjus Sprayskirt Large  Cockpit❤B 8852075137813 | eBay

 

images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRz47ltBYcxoHJNuhdi7wc4FY42o6LxsEIM96Ceuj6afNHywcLAOXqsrq4qgXq6N0UUJAiG738&usqp=CAc

 

spraydeck could be interesting when someone wants your attention or fetches you a brew :D  but then you’re cut off from the controls

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Just now, Hudds Lad said:

 

spraydeck could be interesting when someone wants your attention or fetches you a brew :D  but then you’re cut off from the controls

 

 

Make the elasticated waist 'hole' fit around your neck instead, or even, fit over your head and have a couple of eye-holes.

 

C'mon think outside the box.

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7 minutes ago, OldGoat said:

Having a really waterproof full set of wet weather gear helps a lot. We have ex-RN and RAF goretex kit and if it's really tissing it down, a set of RN foul weather kit as well. Such stuff occasiomaly appears on Ebay...

Gill offshore top half, not splashed out (pardon the pun) on expensive strides, just have two pairs. nothing worse than cheap “waterproofs” where it goes straight through after an hour or less. That said, even the upmarket expensive stuff from outdoorsy shops can be worse than a £10 Regatta pack-a-mac.

13 minutes ago, TheBiscuits said:

 

You'll be stood on the boards over the engine then, so still nice and warm with dry legs.

 

Some boatbuilders provide a larger slide so you can both stand inside.  

 

that’s one of her “yes, but…” questions, more concern for the interior woodwork than the crew, especially if we end up getting one built

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3 minutes ago, Hudds Lad said:

Gill offshore top half, not splashed out (pardon the pun) on expensive strides, just have two pairs. nothing worse than cheap “waterproofs” where it goes straight through after an hour or less. That said, even the upmarket expensive stuff from outdoorsy shops can be worse than a £10 Regatta pack-a-mac.

That's why I bought ex military kit - 'cos it's designed for extreme use. Some of it is nearly new as Officers don't get wet....

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4 minutes ago, OldGoat said:

That's why I bought ex military kit - 'cos it's designed for extreme use. Some of it is nearly new as Officers don't get wet....

 

The problem is that for the last 30 years the military equipment is 'made to the lowest tender' and the quality is appaling. So many squaddies are now buying their own boots, clothing & equipment, particularly when going on deployment in arduous environments.

 

That's why the 'surplus' stuff is almost unused and cheap'

 

Going back 50 years ago then it was excellent (heavy and old technology) and functioned as required.

Commercial walking equipment is today far superior to military 'stuff'.

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54 minutes ago, TheBiscuits said:

Stand on the step with the slide pulled up to you and the doors closed behind you.

 

It's even better when it's snowing!

Likewise but I wear a poncho that covers around the hatch, no water in the boat, warm and dry.

 

The best umbrella is a rope and mooring pin. 

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