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Interesting bits of kit,most of them produce the notes using a jacquard system of cards,similar to that used in weaving sheds in the last century.

I used to work with a guy who had a Bruder organ of a similar size,and he used to compose and punch his own cards.

I was at a canal festival a few years ago and I recognised some of Reg,s music being played on another organ!😎😎😎

  • Greenie 1
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I've always wondered why these instruments were / are always continental in manufacture. Stretching the topic somewhat, why were so many of circus (remember them) acts from foreign climes (mostly european)?

 

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Most of the manufacturers were Dutch,as street organs were a form of cheap entertainment between the World wars.

Circus probably has its origins in Romany travellers performing at markets and village celebrations as a way of earning a crust??

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The picture of the organ was taken at a Stourbrige Navigation Trust Bonded Warehouse open weekend, dont know which year but thay take place in October each year.

The organ is sitting on the Stourbridge Canal Companies weighbridge in front of the original Canal Company buildings.

 

I think that Harley came to the event and exhibited some paintings,posibly at the same time as the organ was there.

 

Steven

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I suspect they are all real locations, although possibly based on old photographs.

The picture bottom left shows a narrow lock with an overflow weir half way down the lockside, so presumably the bottom lock of a staircase pair. Botterham perhaps?

Edited by David Mack
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41 minutes ago, David Mack said:

I suspect they are all real locations, although possibly based on old photographs.

The picture bottom left shows a narrow lock with an overflow weir half way down the lockside, so presumably the bottom lock of a staircase pair. Botterham perhaps?

I agree. I think the larger painting is based on an old photograph of Wolverhampton top lock and Victoria Basin.

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43 minutes ago, David Mack said:

I suspect they are all real locations, although possibly based on old photographs.

The picture bottom left shows a narrow lock with an overflow weir half way down the lockside, so presumably the bottom lock of a staircase pair. Botterham perhaps?

Could also have been based on the bottom chamber at Bratch as it to has an overflow in the same position

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2 hours ago, Mac of Cygnet said:

Well at least one of the pictures should be instantly recognisable to most boaters as the most photographed telephone pole in the country!

 

1 hour ago, David Mack said:

I suspect they are all real locations, although possibly based on old photographs.

The picture bottom left shows a narrow lock with an overflow weir half way down the lockside, so presumably the bottom lock of a staircase pair. Botterham perhaps?

All of the paintings on that organ thing are copies of published photographs.

 

The motor passing down a Staffs and Worcs canal lock is T. & S. Elements MAYFLOWER - published in Eric de Mare The Canals of England page 58 - claims to be Bratch.

 

The large group of boats is at the top of Wolverhampton locks - published in Paul Collins Black Country Canals page 16. 

 

The Claytons motor TEES and its butty passing through High Bridge in August 1955 - published in Alan H. Faulkner's Claytons of Oldbury page 17.

 

The Shropshire Union horse boat is ELECTOR at Stourport in 1910 - published in Tom Chaplins hardback version of Narrow Boats pages 2 and 3.

 

These are just examples of where these images have been reproduced, and some have been re-published numerous times - and demonstrate that the painter of this organ used little in the way of artistic interpretation, but can be credited for adding some colour :captain:

Edited by pete harrison
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6 hours ago, Ian F B said:

Most of the manufacturers were Dutch,

Interesting because the maker I am most familiar with is Gavioli which was a French/Italian company. 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gavioli

 

I went to university with a major Fairground Organ collector he was a proper anorak and loved talking about them. I was happy to listen for the few weeks I remained there before I left to go boating. 

 

Eta here he is on YouTube 17 years later. Bloody hell time flies 

 

 

Edited by magnetman
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As the owner of De Harley Crossley,  This is a Dutch Street Organ not a fair organ, the correct details are Built in 1968 by Arthur Bursens of Hoboken, Antwerp, Belgium.  He was well into his seventies when he built this organ, the second of 4 similar 52key instruments, He later continued building new 68key organs up to his death when he was in his 80s.  The paintings were all done by Harley Crossley, at the time the only organ named after the painter with his genuine paintings. The paintings are, T & S Elements, Mayflower in Bratch Locks, Wolverhampton Top Lock c1910, Thomas Clayton pair at Highbridge, and at the top a Shropshire Union Boat at Stourport.  The photo was taken in 2018 at Stourbridge.  With the death of Arthur Bursens, the firm came to the end and no longer exists.

Edited by Coventry No 1
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On 10/05/2020 at 09:56, Ian F B said:

Interesting bits of kit,most of them produce the notes using a jacquard system of cards,similar to that used in weaving sheds in the last century.

 

When the Birmingham Science Museum was in Newhall Street alongside the Farmers Bridge flight the entrance hall contained the Orchestrion Organ, originally built for Blackpool Aquarium and later installed in the Tower. It too was driven by a punched hole system - I think they were concertina'd cards, but may been more like a piano roll. The front of the instrument was grand - all polished woodwork and shiny brass pipes. The back was more utilitarian, but had a glass viewing window where you could see the action.  I can remember standing there watching it for ages, mentally tracking the patterns in the holes, and the corresponding sounds from the pipes. 

I believe it has been in storage since the museum moved to the Think Tank, so can't be seen now. Shame.

 

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Nick who I was at university with made his own folded music cards using a special machine he had constructed himself. Very impressive to see how he could convert modern day MP3 music to punched cards and feed them through an organ. 

 

Amazing really. 

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2 hours ago, David Mack said:

 "I think they were concertina'd cards, but may been more like a piano roll. "  Thank you for posting this. I haven't heard The Orchestrion for about 25 years. I never operated it but was often called upon to take visitors behind the doors when I worked in the Museum. From memory it was a piano type roll, rather than a Jacquard, running over a table, but not really certain after all this time. The speed control was always a bit of a nightmare and that was obvious in the recording.

 

Quote

 

 

Edited by BuckbyLocks
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7 hours ago, Machpoint005 said:

 

Thanks for posting the Youtube clip. A picture of a musical device (I won't call it an instrument) is about as much use as a picture of a pint of beer!

 

 

I agree, I am always attracted to them when I visit a Steam Rally, especially the old Fairground Organs like this powerful Gavioli. I have the original LP recording made in the 1960;s which I have since transferred onto CD. It has entertained the visitors at more than one summer fete.

 

 

Edited by David Schweizer
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Once you are able to travel, I would to recommend a holiday in Germany to include a trip to the Siegfried’s Museum of mechanical musical instruments. It’s in beautiful Rudesheim on the river Rhine, they have a fantastic (working) collection of different instruments. Unfortunately I can’t upload my personal videos as they are too big, but there are plenty on YouTube. 

Edited by MHS
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