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DHutch

Site Owner Donate to Canal World
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About DHutch

  • Birthday 05/26/1987

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Wirral
  • Interests
    Steam Engines, Boats, Canals, Sailing, Engineering, Forums, Friends/Family, etc.

Previous Fields

  • Occupation
    Senior Design Engineer
  • Boat Name
    EmilyAnne
  • Boat Location
    Northwest & roaming.

Contact Methods

  • Website URL
    http://www.emilyanne.co.uk

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DHutch's Achievements

  1. A friend has a contact who lives on a boat and has a Hamco 2000 oil cooker, which is about 50 years old and needs replacing. It also heats the water They are looking for anything or anyone that could replace it for a newer version? I've said that oil cookers are not that common. However open to advice of a replacement and or suggestions of someone who can do the work. Potentially including converting to diesal/gas. Thanks Daniel
  2. Hi, Sorry to hear you are having issues. I presume you still have access to the email address used? And have checked your spam folder? I can manually reset your pw and email it to the account email address. I can then also merge the two accounts, if both accounts PM me to confirm that. You can also get in touch with the site staff using staff@canalworld.net or our contact us form. @NewCanalBoy Daniel
  3. We use Lieghs paints (SW now) and have done since the boat is new, in part because my grandfather is a Boltonian and used them decades before hand. We will certainly speak to them, however it's also good to get ideals and thought from here. Especially as what works commercially isn't always compatible with or the best option for the DIY boat application. It does however sound like a really searching thin paint, and encapsulation is the best route, rather than mechanical or chemical removal or conversion. Daniel
  4. It's a 10mm base plate, effectively zero pitting on the outside, so we're not worried yet. But stopping the pits getting deeper is very much on the agenda.
  5. Ok. And although it is talk about being used after grit blasting, it will be able to treat/eat/prep its way into 3-4mm think black rust?
  6. Y See that sounds really promising, and our surveyor also recommended it, and it's that pitted even rain marks don't worry me. Roland's comments are less reassuring here. But have a read around the previous threads. As I understand it, slightly contrary to it's name, it does dry to form a hard and coherent surface, that you can walk on, over paint, grind off again, etc. All bit of over a few days. I guess a bit like Danish oil drys.
  7. Yes, I mean we could blast it, but unless anyone can recommend somewhere with the kit that would do it for a reasonable cost in the NW, I still fear it's going to be prohibitive in terms of cost and mess. You have to sheet up the whole of the inside of the wheel house, from the floor to the folding sides, then the whole area below the floor which is about 3ft off the base plate, then stand in an 7ft deep hole shot blasting (your feet?) through the hatch in the floor. Which not damaging anything! Not that it wouldn't be nice to blast it! And as suggested below, I'm sure if there off tiny bits, the epoxy would bridge over just fine. That was my thought first time right at the start of this, before we used Vactan much at all, and it actually exactly what we did do 15 years ago, but it failed. Which is why we did it again, with Vactan, a few years ago, which has now failed again! Yeah, I mean it feels ok, and running at the designed circa 100psi it's got grunt. However when the compressor doesn't have the whaft you end up at 40psi very quickly, and have to wait for it to build again, and it just takes all day. I was having a bit of a dig around after we did some more needle gunning, and while some pits where ok, maybe one in ten you could easy chip a 4mm thick 6mm dia chunk out, and maybe as many as 50% had a mm or so of the black rust left. I did actually bring the chisel but we ran out of time to try it, however with what must be 100s if not 1000s of pits you would never be able to do anything one an individual basis for the whole area, even 2sqm that's just days of work. It would be faster to cut the whole section out in drydock and weld a new 5ft of baseplate in! Daniel See that sounds really promising, and our surveyor also recommended it, and it's that pitted even rain marks don't worry me.
  8. Yes, I mean we could blast it, but unless anyone can recommend somewhere with the kit that would do it for a reasonable cost in the NW, I still fear it's going to be prohibitive in terms of cost and mess. You have to sheet up the whole of the inside of the wheel house, from the floor to the folding sides, then the whole area below the floor which is about 3ft off the base plate, then stand in an 7ft deep hole shot blasting (your feet?) through the hatch in the floor. Which not damaging anything!
  9. Yes. It claims 4cubic feet a min average, but that must be a low duty cycle! More like 10-15 while running I would guess.
  10. Also just and overall comment to say a huge thanks to everyone who has commented on the thread so far. I've tried to keep up with the replies, and answer the questions raised, but if I've missed the odd one let me know! Daniel
  11. Granted, I have had one the same for one place of work, and likewise for Lowri's flat. You can get them in all colours. But blue/green seems much more common then red/orange! However, what I want to know is what this one is for! 😆 Ahhh. Now that could be it. My gut feeling is it is for somewhere north, that I've not been to. The Lancaster fits that in a way not many places do. Also for facilities, not a Marina. At which point, it seems like it is now defunct! Daniel
  12. As I understand it, black ferroso ferric rust (Fe3 O4) is formed rather that conventional red rust (Fe2 O3) when there is a shortage of oxygen, such as under a robust but failed paint surface, or if you have water trapped under oil or the like, and rather than coming of nicely it's a right pig! And it's magnetic... I'm not a chemist, but I can vouch for it being a pig to remove! Maybe we should sharpen our needle gun, and or get a 3-4hp compressor!
  13. I wish the needle gun got it back to bright. Often it's very good, if the rust is in the early stages, nice loose fluffy red rust, off like a flash and a lot better at taking the failed coating off to access it that a wire wheel. However the black rust when it's had limited oxygen, deep at the bottom of these pits, is good and hard the surface so 3D at 3mm+ deep the gun seems to struggle. This also not helped by the size of the task, as the compressor can't keep up with gun, so you end up running at lower pressures and powers even if you wait for it to get back up for the harder bits and or a final blast. It's 'only' machine mart Clarke Air model, and I'm sure an industrial model with a 5+hp compressor to match and sharp needles would do more. But it certainly can't get this area of the boat upto good enough to put even surface tolerant epoxy ali onto. Daniel
  14. Infuriating isn't it! This bottom is 30 years old. And maybe this is the answer. Forget about trying to get any paint to stick, and go down the Owatrol Oil, Waxoyl, Dinatrol route? Early post about Waxoyl being porus noted, if slightly supprised by that comment?
  15. We mix the base well before measuring, if typically carefully and vigorously with a stick rather than drill, due to the cleanup issues with two pack. The ali epoxy base is so thick you can stand a spoon in it and it be there days later. When fresh from the factory a few days earlier, we just use it. After about a year it with settle with a 5mm layer on top, and again we beat that into it well.
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