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tank cutter


haza
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3 hours ago, Bazza954 said:

Starrett hole saws are best . (not the cheapest )

If you are drilling cast iron do not use cutting compound or oil, it's best drilled without and at slow speed, the cutting compound /oil just turns the cast iron swarf into a paste which blunts the cutter in no time at all.

 

 

I also find that cheap (rubbish) holesaws tend to dril oval holes and wander a bit, so even if you only want to drill a single hole it’s not worth saving money on a cheap one.

 

added Not 

Edited by Chewbacka
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On ‎05‎/‎11‎/‎2018 at 13:49, bizzard said:

Site a 2'' field gun opon the bank, at a reasonable distance, pointing its barrel at your hull side and shoot it with an armour piercing shell.

Would that not give you a hole on both sides of the boat ! :D:D

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On 05/11/2018 at 11:35, Boater Sam said:

Sorry, correct, forgot to mention the self lubricating property of high carbon steels such as cast iron. Not to be confused with cast steel which can be a swine to cut.

Sorry to be pedantic, but cast iron isn't a form of steel. Steel is an alloy of iron and carbon (and lots of other things as it becomes more exotic, as I'm sure you know).

 

Cast iron has graphite in it which acts as a lubricant when machining it, but it's unlikely the OP is drilling that unless it's a very old boat.

 

When I was an apprentice, we used some ghastly smelling light green 'snot' called Trefolex for drilling and tapping steel, but these days, I mostly use Rocol cutting compound, and paraffin for aluminium.

 

My four year mechanical engineering apprenticeship ended in 1985 and I can barely remember last week these days, so the above has taken a lot of head scratching, but I hope it's of interest.

 

I forgot to add, another vote for Starrett hole saws here.

Edited by Joe the plumber
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11 minutes ago, Joe the plumber said:

Sorry to be pedantic, but cast iron isn't a form of steel. Steel is an alloy of iron and carbon (and lots of other things as it becomes more exotic, as I'm sure you know).

 

Cast iron has graphite in it which acts as a lubricant when machining it, but it's unlikely the OP is drilling that unless it's a very old boat.

 

When I was an apprentice, we used some ghastly smelling light green 'snot' called Trefolex for drilling and tapping steel, but these days, I mostly use Rocol cutting compound, and paraffin for aluminium.

 

My four year mechanical engineering apprenticeship ended in 1985 and I can barely remember last week these days, so the above has taken a lot of head scratching, but I hope it's of interest.

 

I forgot to add, another vote for Starrett hole saws here.

From memory steel contains less than 2% carbon, any more and by definition it’s not steel, whereas cast iron contains more.

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I have had success with Bosch holesaws including a 177mm hole saw I used on a 14.4 makita drill to start off the cutouts in 6mm steel ie make a groove for the jigsaw to follow. That was for portholes. Decent quality hole saw still works and has gone through  quite a bit of 1.5 inch thick teak as well. 

 

For a 1 inch hole in steel plate another option might be a carbide hole cutter. I've got a 20mm one and it goes through steel fast. 

 

 

Edited by magnetman
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23 minutes ago, magnetman said:

I have had success with Bosch holesaws including a 177mm hole saw I used on a 14.4 makita drill to start off the cutouts in 6mm steel ie make a groove for the jigsaw to follow. That was for portholes. Decent quality hole saw still works and has gone through  quite a bit of 1.5 inch thick teak as well. 

 

For a 1 inch hole in steel plate another option might be a carbide hole cutter. I've got a 20mm one and it goes through steel fast. 

 

 

+1 for Bosch, I have several and never had a problem

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2 hours ago, Joe the plumber said:

 

 

When I was an apprentice, we used some ghastly smelling light green 'snot' called Trefolex for drilling and tapping steel, but these days, I mostly use Rocol cutting compound, and paraffin for aluminium.

 

I like Rocol, I still have a bottle on the boat from when I was fitting out.

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2 hours ago, Joe the plumber said:

<snip>

When I was an apprentice, we used some ghastly smelling light green 'snot' called Trefolex for drilling and tapping steel, but these days, I mostly use Rocol cutting compound, and paraffin for aluminium. <snip>

I've also used Trefolex, Rocol, and a brown snot which I'm desperately trying to remember the name of -just had a quick google - Temaxol, though usually based on availability rather than a "best choice" and, in the absence of other alternatives, cooking oil.  Any lubricant is better than none.

 

springy

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11 minutes ago, springy said:

I've also used Trefolex, Rocol, and a brown snot which I'm desperately trying to remember the name of -just had a quick google - Temaxol, though usually based on availability rather than a "best choice" and, in the absence of other alternatives, cooking oil.  Any lubricant is better than none.

 

springy

What about the good old Russian Tallow that I had to use as an apprentice for cutting threads on steel conduit  

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On 10/11/2018 at 14:13, Joe the plumber said:

When I was an apprentice, we used some ghastly smelling light green 'snot' called Trefolex for drilling and tapping steel, but these days, I mostly use Rocol cutting compound, and paraffin for aluminium.

I forgot to add, another vote for Starrett hole saws here.

In my early days of drilling and cutting we used a home brew concoction nicknamed Mystic, basically a mix of oil an  water in the right proportions,also tallow for thread cutting.

 

A vote from me also for Starret, to my mind simply the best. I still have a selection of rather old Starret hole saws, even though they have been extensively used as good as the day they were purchased.

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