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ronnietucker

solo parallel parking

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Generally, for a small outboard-powered cruiser, the advice seems to be to approach the mooring very slowly, bow at 20 -30 degrees to the bank / pontoon, when bow is just off the mooring point put helm hard over away from mooring and use a little astern power to pull the stern into the bank / pontoon. Then step off with a line attached to a centre cleat in hand and secure the boat. Then attach the bow and sten lines and stow the centre line. Seems to work fine for me and my 23' cruiser.

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Once you've clattered your way in and out of the mooring a couple of times, you'll find it becomes much easier.

This is because those moored fore and aft will adjust their lines to allow you an extra couple of feet!

;)

  • Greenie 2

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If there's a current then the ferry glide is a very handy manoeure, and enables you to move sideways across the current. 

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Parallel parking in a car is easier in reverse, and needs less space, because the steering axle is "last in" to the parking space. You cannot control the lateral position of the car's rear wheels, but you can the front.

A boat's rudder is at the rear, not the front, so the converse would seem to apply: the easiest approach to the mooring space is forwards, not backwards, as Chris Br said above.

On the other hand, you don't have to jump out of a car to moor up, and in order to jump off the boat the arsend needs to be close enough to the bank -- as MtB said.

So the answers must be "it depends", and "keep practising".

Edited by Machpoint005

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On 3/1/2018 at 21:23, ChrisMoonRiver said:

put helm hard over away from mooring and use a little astern power to pull the stern into the bank / pontoon

Or, in the case of a narrowboat, put helm hard over towards the mooring and use a little ahead power to push the stern into the bank / pontoon.

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If it really is tight I would suggest that you Google Spring Lines and how to use them.

I am amazed at how few narrow boaters seem to have any inkling to how to use a spring line. It will be easy to use the stern line as a spring and then with some reverse spring the bow out.  A long spring from the bow will probably allow you to spring the font in if you step off the stern. In fact a short spring from the stern many do it.

Springs are far easier then struggling when trying to get a a narrowboat alongside in half a gale blowing off the mooring.

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39 minutes ago, Tony Brooks said:

If it really is tight I would suggest that you Google Spring Lines and how to use them.

I am amazed at how few narrow boaters seem to have any inkling to how to use a spring line. It will be easy to use the stern line as a spring and then with some reverse spring the bow out.  A long spring from the bow will probably allow you to spring the font in if you step off the stern. In fact a short spring from the stern many do it.

Springs are far easier then struggling when trying to get a a narrowboat alongside in half a gale blowing off the mooring.

Springs are not an easy option when going alongside - (especially so in tight mooring situations) - if there are no rings, bollards etc. to make fast to and possibly someone on the bank to help take a rope. Similarly, when letting go you need something to rig a slip spring to. Difficult if there are no fixed mooring points to attach your spring (unless you want to sacrifice a mooring stake!).

Howard

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5 hours ago, Machpoint005 said:

Parallel parking in a car is easier in reverse, and needs less space, because the steering axle is "last in" to the parking space. You cannot control the lateral position of the car's rear wheels, but you can the front.

A boat's rudder is at the rear, not the front, so the converse would seem to apply: the easiest approach to the mooring space is forwards, not backwards, as Chris Br said above.

On the other hand, you don't have to jump out of a car to moor up, and in order to jump off the boat the arsend needs to be close enough to the bank -- as MtB said.

So the answers must be "it depends", and "keep practising".

Don't forget the OP has a steerable propellor on an outboard, not a prop on a shaft with a separate rudder.

It makes a world of difference to maneuvering, and going backwards is much easier to hop off on a GRP cruiser.

  • Greenie 1

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13 minutes ago, TheBiscuits said:

Don't forget the OP has a steerable propellor on an outboard, not a prop on a shaft with a separate rudder.

It makes a world of difference to maneuvering, and going backwards is much easier to hop off on a GRP cruiser.

Especially with a rudder extension (adda rudda or similar )

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4 hours ago, Machpoint005 said:

Or, in the case of a narrowboat, put helm hard over towards the mooring and use a little ahead power to push the stern into the bank / pontoon.

For narrowboats,  it's more usual to go by the rule of 2s:

Apply forward power (2 much)

Head for the mooring (2 fast)

Apply full power astern (2 much, 2 late)

Hit the mooring (2 hard)

Pivot sideways (in 2 another boat)

and back to...

Apply forward power (2 much)

Repeat until everyone is shouting, then select neutral as angrily as possible and have a hissy fit. The boat will now drift gently to the side.

(Taken from the Canal Boat Club* handbook)

 

* Other battered-looking blue boats are available, although this technique can often be seen operating equally effectively in a wide range of privately owned, timeshare or hire craft in a range of colours.

 

 

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1 hour ago, Tony Brooks said:

If it really is tight I would suggest that you Google Spring Lines and how to use them.

I am amazed at how few narrow boaters seem to have any inkling to how to use a spring line. It will be easy to use the stern line as a spring and then with some reverse spring the bow out.  A long spring from the bow will probably allow you to spring the font in if you step off the stern. In fact a short spring from the stern many do it.

Springs are far easier then struggling when trying to get a a narrowboat alongside in half a gale blowing off the mooring.

 I can see how to use a spring to bring the bow out and set off, and I manage it when I need. Is it possible to moor with a spring when I’m on my own ?  I don’t follow what you’re saying. I can see it working with crew  

 

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It wont work unless there are suitable pins/rings on the mooring and much depends upon bow shape and where the line is fixed on the boat. It is easier with crew.

This is how I would try it.

Bring the stern in and step off with both lines. Make sure the bow line is in the fairlead on the mooring side of the boat (remember its a GRP cruiser).  Run the bow line back as far as possible and tie off.

pull stern in because it will have drifted out and get back on. Apply rudder to push the stern in a little and gently motor ahead adjusting rudder and speed as required. I think the spring from  the front will just pull the bow in.  This may not work if you do not have fairleads - I have them on the narrowboat.

Also if you did the same but ties the stern line well back away from the boat you would probably find driving the boat ahead would push the bow in.

 

Our mooring is horrible to get onto if any wind is blowing so I get the back as close to the boat behind as I can. By that time the bow is drifting towards the boats on the next jetty along. Step off with the centre line and tie off as far back as I can then motor ahead using the rudder to keep the stern against the jetty. The centre spring pulls the bow in so leaving it in gear I step off, tie the stern, then tie the bow and then put it in neutral and take the spring off.

The ability to use springs rather than brute force helps keep us boating as age takes hold!

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Cheers, anything to avoid brute force, I try and let the boat work do the work  

So using the centre line to bring the bow in, is in effect using a springer? 

 

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21 minutes ago, Tony Brooks said:

The ability to use springs rather than brute force helps keep us boating as age takes hold!

It makes it a sight easier for us younger ones too!

We are always amazed at how many 4' 6" women we see trying to pull a big boat with a rope while a 6' bloke stands on the boat shouting at her.

If I take a line to help I stick two turns round a bollard or a tree then stand there and wait.  It's funny to see them look confused.

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7 minutes ago, TheBiscuits said:

We are always amazed at how many 4' 6" women we see trying to pull a big boat with a rope while a 6' bloke stands on the boat shouting at her.

I do not. I'm usually sitting when I shout at her to pull the boat in, make fast, then put the kettle on for a cuppa:)

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1 hour ago, Scholar Gypsy said:

Especially with a rudder extension (adda rudda or similar )

Indeed it does. I have fitted a RudderSafe, which seems to have been a good if expensive investment, plus a full water bag and a couple of bags of pea shingle in the bow to help when cruising. Chris.

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1 hour ago, Goliath said:

Cheers, anything to avoid brute force, I try and let the boat work do the work  

So using the centre line to bring the bow in, is in effect using a springer? 

 

Yes if you combine it with the use of the engine. No if you use brute force.

Any line set at all but parallel to the boat is a spring be it to assist manoeuvring or to stop the boat surging forwards and backwards on a mooring.

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