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pagan witch
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Here you have a typical narrowboat shell being built. There is ample room to recess the hull giving step rungs at any given place along its length. Both sides if you so wish. Then a simple symbol on the side would indicate where the steps are located.

 

Given that narrowboats travel at slow speed their movement through the water will be unaffected.

It isn't the movement through the water, it is the loss of space, on the inside for an unnecessary extra.

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As for all of you who have your doubts about the merits of boarding ladders, im sure should we ever have the misfortune of being moored/moving any where near any of you and you have the misfortune of falling in that you wont want the use of the ladder as an easy escape.

 

It isn't the movement through the water, it is the loss of space, on the inside for an unnecessary extra.

 

The loss of space would be tiny. Careful positioning would minimise this further.

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It isn't the movement through the water, it is the loss of space, on the inside for an unnecessary extra.

 

 

:lol: Hi

 

Listen u lot stop picking on poor phylis it is not fair to have a battle of wits with one who is so obviously unarmed !

Besides she is but a child at age 25 and didnt we all know everything when we were kids ?

Keep at it girl go on wear ya keyboard out........... :lol:

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hull.jpg

 

Here you have a typical narrowboat shell being built. There is ample room to recess the hull giving step rungs at any given place along its length. Both sides if you so wish. Then a simple symbol on the side would indicate where the steps are located.

 

Given that narrowboats travel at slow speed their movement through the water will be unaffected.

I promised myself I wouldn't do this - I must be taking leave of my senses. :lol:

 

Phylis,

 

You are simply continuing to pontificate on something you clearly have no understanding of whatsoever.

 

If you have tried to climb the vertical runged ladders at the side of a canal lock, you will know you need at least 3" beyond the rungs for your toes, if you are not going to slide off. Add another inch or so for the rungs, and the minimum "tunnel" up the side of a narrowboat that would be required for this ridiculous suggestion is 4", (10 cms), (and to be really safe, it needs to be more, particularly as narrowboat hulls usually widen slightly the further you get from the baseplate).

 

Space inside is just too much at a premium to introduce a 4" narrowing internally to provide this facility. Place them opposite each other, and you would need a full 8" or 20 cms off the internal width of the boat.

 

If you had any practical experience of narrowboats, you would understand why this is a non-starter. Unfortunately a lack of knowledge or experience doesn't seem to reduce your conviction that you are always right.

 

Clearly there would also be massive implications for the structural integrity and strength of the boat.

 

I can't be a**ed to argue more, but this is quite the most ridiculous thing yet, in what has been rather a long list of quite ridiculous things!

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I promised myself I wouldn't do this - I must be taking leave of my senses. :lol:

 

Phylis,

 

You are simply continuing to pontificate on something you clearly have no understanding of whatsoever.

 

If you have tried to climb the vertical runged ladders at the side of a canal lock, you will know you need at least 3" beyond the rungs for your toes, if you are not going to slide off. Add another inch or so for the rungs, and the minimum "tunnel" up the side of a narrowboat that would be required for this ridiculous suggestion is 4", (10 cms), (and to be really safe, it needs to be more, particularly as narrowboat hulls usually widen slightly the further you get from the baseplate).

 

Space inside is just too much at a premium to introduce a 4" narrowing internally to provide this facility. Place them opposite each other, and you would need a full 8" or 20 cms off the internal width of the boat.

 

If you had any practical experience of narrowboats, you would understand why this is a non-starter. Unfortunately a lack of knowledge or experience doesn't seem to reduce your conviction that you are always right.

 

Clearly there would also be massive implications for the structural integrity and strength of the boat.

 

I can't be a**ed to argue more, but this is quite the most ridiculous thing yet, in what has been rather a long list of quite ridiculous things!

 

You know that awkward corner in the kitchen cupboard that gets full of stuff you dont need. Well instead of filling it with something you dont need, fill it with something that might just save your life.

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You know that awkward corner in the kitchen cupboard that gets full of stuff you dont need. Well instead of filling it with something you dont need, fill it with something that might just save your life.

 

 

This girl is popping drugs............!!

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Pagan Witch starts a thread about a tragic incident ( I bet he regrets it now!) and all this forum can do is turn the thread into a petty argument! :lol: :lol:

 

By the way at the risk of adding fuel to the fire. The poor gentleman may have been rendered incapacitated by the cold, unconscious even (as pointed out earlier he could also fell in because of a heart attack or other condition) so a debate ( I am being kind here) about the relative merits of a ladder permanently fixed to a boat would be rendered moot in that circumstance.

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Pagan Witch starts a thread about a tragic incident ( I bet he regrets it now!) and all this forum can do is turn the thread into a petty argument! :lol: :lol:

It raised the question of whether a ladder would be worthwhile. This was not off topic.

Edited by carlt
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You know that awkward corner in the kitchen cupboard that gets full of stuff you dont need. Well instead of filling it with something you dont need, fill it with something that might just save your life.

I feel like a Carl surrogate, (though I admit I'm not as practised!).

 

Most kitchen cupboards are half way along the boat. Whilst trying to climb this vertical runged ladded in many kilos of water logged clothing, what am I going to hang on to ? Some discrete handles that happen to be let into the cabinsides, also in their own little tunnel, and hidden by some high level cabinet I also don't need ?

 

You might as well build the boat with some postage stamp type perforations at this point along it's length, because that's how strong it might end up!.

 

Nobody can help pull me out, if I'm using steps half way along the boat - the only point they can possibly be useful is at one end or the other.

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Trolls cant climb - that is why they are found under bridges!

 

I think Phylis asked a perfectly reasonable question - it's one I've been asked. The replies appear to be perfectly reasonable way of explaining why what on the face it is a good idea, isn't actually a good idea in practicality.

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As already mentioned, RCD calls for vessels to be capable of self reboarding. Larger RCD compliant vessel have come up with all sorts of methods - one dutch barge has ladder steps/pockets in the hull sides, at least 1 luxemotor has rungs up the trailing edge of the rudder and then up the overhang of the counter. You would need rock climbing skills to get up that. All have been "proved" by a fit young, warm and dry boat builder starting from the concrete workshop base. I still maintain that many bargees, if not most, would have considerable trouble trying to get out when shocked and cold. The person I rescued, in Sept when the water is at its warmest, could not even think of how to get out, let alone try and do something about it. As has been pointed our, alot of upper body strength is required.

 

Less than 10C water and 10 mins immersion is probably dead - and if you do lift them out vertically they will probably die of hypothermic shock. At sea our man overboard rescue bogey time is well less than 10 mins.

 

Swim ladder and bathing platform is probably the only realistic self recovery option for most boaters.

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As already mentioned, RCD calls for vessels to be capable of self reboarding. Larger RCD compliant vessel have come up with all sorts of methods - one dutch barge has ladder steps/pockets in the hull sides, at least 1 luxemotor has rungs up the trailing edge of the rudder and then up the overhang of the counter. You would need rock climbing skills to get up that. All have been "proved" by a fit young, warm and dry boat builder starting from the concrete workshop base. I still maintain that many bargees, if not most, would have considerable trouble trying to get out when shocked and cold. The person I rescued, in Sept when the water is at its warmest, could not even think of how to get out, let alone try and do something about it. As has been pointed our, alot of upper body strength is required.

 

Less than 10C water and 10 mins immersion is probably dead - and if you do lift them out vertically they will probably die of hypothermic shock. At sea our man overboard rescue bogey time is well less than 10 mins.

 

Swim ladder and bathing platform is probably the only realistic self recovery option for most boaters.

As someone who in another life worked for a company that insisted a local nautical college tried to drown him every three years doing underwater helicopter escapes and man overboard drills jumping of the sea wall at Lowestoft, I know how hard it is to get into a life raft that has about 10" soft free board and underwater soft ladder let alone 24" of steel narrowboat. Even with your mate pushing up your bum its hard just to slither into a life raft let alone climb up a vertical ladder. We also use to have to climb out of the watter up scramble nets, they were in a warm pool and you were not FULLY clothed only overalls and that took the steam out of you.

I think it would be far easier t crawl up a canal bank than climb onto the boat. To get out on a pontoon mooring without a good ladder would I think be next to impossible.

Brian

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A couple of months ago my foot slipped off the gunwale of a Large Northwich motor boat, alongside the (back) cabin. I had one hand on the handrail, I could hold myself from falling further for a while but couldn't pull back up. Eventually I had to let go, and 'walk' to the bank where I could drag myself out. Much easier than trying to get back on to the boat.

 

Tim

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I suspect, when they look they'll find he drowned pretty quickly. When you go over into cold water your immediate response is a rapid inhale. If you don't go in with your mouth covered and your head goes under, chances are you'll not be worried about getting back out.

 

As for fitting ladders or some sort of re-boarding method I don't know. I'd venture a guess that many people are not going to have the upper-body strength to pull themselves and their sopping wet clothes up the sides of a boat anyway. The best option is some sort of foot-hold under the water for you to push up with.

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One thing has just occurred to me.

 

The man who died was on a boat, called Swansong, moored at Willington.

 

Does this ring a bell with anyone.

 

(Hint, Front page of NBW a few days ago).

 

Hmm, certainly got on Old Toms wick. :lol:

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