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nicky79

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Hi Just bought my 1st narrowboat and will be ccing.   has anyone else had an organ transplant and if so any advice on hospital care Please , My  doctor says this is not advisable to do due to transplant (after I had bought my boat may I add)

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Perhaps your doctor simply doesn’t really understand what living on a narrowboat is like, and is saying “no” just as a default answer. Unless you have to go into hospital for a prolonged period I don’t really see what the problem is.

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Yes maybe.  We originate from Plymouth and I'm afraid he says we will be too far from the hospital . but I'm sure they can all share records . Still gonna do it regardless of his views .😁

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I'm not too sure that asking medical advice from an Internet forum rather than listening to medical advice from your doctor and/or surgeon is particularly wise, especially with the total lack of detail provided in your post. But maybe I'm being too cautious.🤔

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4 minutes ago, nicknorman said:

Perhaps your doctor simply doesn’t really understand what living on a narrowboat is like, and is saying “no” just as a default answer. Unless you have to go into hospital for a prolonged period I don’t really see what the problem is.

 

Given the OP's location I wondered if the GP didn't know what a NB was and assumed it was just another sea boat of some description or other. I can see how living on a boat on the sea might be a bit daft to a GP after an organ transplant.

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Just now, nicky79 said:

I have some of the doctors saying do it it will be great for you and  some saying otherwise so really not sure what to do

 

What do YOU think though? Often the patient knows better than the doctor. 

 

CCing and staying near a large hospital might not be too easy given the CC rules. You might be better off getting a mooring.

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Could you move down to a piano or is it too heavy to lift?

There are lots of reasons why a physical problem could preclude living on a narrowboat but lots seem to overcome them. It will be better for your wellbeing of course as advertised.

Edited by Tracy D'arth
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If you have an easily accessible mooring (no ladders, quayside or jetty) and someone available to help you with water/fuel/shopping/whatever you should be OK.  Climbing a ladder or rowing a tender with a dozen bags of coal seems silly immediately after an organ transplant!

 

If your doctor thinks that Plymouth is too far from the hospital in case of any problems later then it's not about the boat as such - he'd say the same if you lived in a flat or a house in Plymouth.

 

 

 

Duh! Misread the post.  

 

The logic still holds though.

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Has been both of our dreams for 20 years so yes we will do it and life is way too short to not try it ... Its better to regret the things you've done than to regret the things you haven't done .. So if you see Iron Maiden give us a wave (ps she came with her name)

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1 minute ago, nicky79 said:

Has been both of our dreams for 20 years so yes we will do it and life is way too short to not try it ... Its better to regret the things you've done than to regret the things you haven't done .. So if you see Iron Maiden give us a wave (ps she came with her name)

Definitely! Best of luck for your new venture.

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I had occasion to call 111 two months ago and made a timed appointment with Urgent Care at local hospital, I took a taxi, which seemed to lack rear suspension so I felt pretty bad by the time I arrived. 

As always the NHS have a solution, though they do make every effort to keep ambulances for acute cases. 

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3 minutes ago, nicky79 said:

Has been both of our dreams for 20 years so yes we will do it and life is way too short to not try it ... Its better to regret the things you've done than to regret the things you haven't done .. So if you see Iron Maiden give us a wave (ps she came with her name)

I would imagine that "run to the hills" isn't all that appropriate for a narrowboat!😁

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I would say a lot depends on what after care you need.

 

If it requires continuing on going monitoring by a particular type of specialist then moving around on a boat might make this more challenging.

 

There are though no real reasons why living on a boat per sae shouldnt be precluded taking acount some of the comments already offered.

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Can you get your care transferred to a hospital somewhere in the Midlands? Then you will be in much easier reach of the canal system for hospital appointments. The system must be able to deal with this when patients move house to another part of the country, so I don't see why they can't do the same if you are moving to live afloat and CC in a different part of the country.

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6 minutes ago, David Mack said:

Can you get your care transferred to a hospital somewhere in the Midlands? Then you will be in much easier reach of the canal system for hospital appointments. The system must be able to deal with this when patients move house to another part of the country, so I don't see why they can't do the same if you are moving to live afloat and CC in a different part of the country.

You would hope so, but when I had my hip replaced the first thing the consultant said at the first meeting was " you do realise that if you have problems in the future you will have to come back to this hospital".   I assume that was because I chose one 60 miles from home rather than the 20 to the nearest.

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About 30 years ago I had a friend (sadly now deceased) who took extended cruises on his narrowboat  from April to October. He had a heart transplant.

 

However he always cruised with someone and only steered the boat, so that his companion always did the heavy tasks such as locking and mooring. When he needed to attend hospital he got there by public transport or taxi.

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Yes thankfully my husband is very strong and will be doing most of the hard work so Im sure we will be ok my transplant was done in Oxford but my local hospital is Plymouth where i am reviewed I will try to speak to Oxford team as they may be more understanding of the canal system x Thanks for everyones advice x

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26 minutes ago, nicky79 said:

Yes thankfully my husband is very strong and will be doing most of the hard work so Im sure we will be ok my transplant was done in Oxford but my local hospital is Plymouth where i am reviewed I will try to speak to Oxford team as they may be more understanding of the canal system x Thanks for everyones advice x

As I'm sure you're aware Oxford is effectively on the South Oxford canal which links directly with a vast cruising area.

Whatever you decide I wish you the very best of luck and good health.

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