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Giving up narrowboating due to age related physical impairment - and boat disposal


Horace42

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Regretfully due to age related physical impairment we have not been able to safely use our narrowboat for the last 3 years - it is just sat at the end of the garden collecting leaves - and spiders - and insurance - and CRT bills...

 

Coupled to which our children have been asking us to move somewhere nearer to them so they can call in quickly if we need help.

 

And last year we did need help. My wife was struck down by a stroke and I became her full time carer - leaving no time for chat rooms (if anybody has noticed my absence).

 

I am saying this, not to seek sympathy, but as a matter of fact, so that my problems of boat disposal can be understood and answered.

 

We are selling up our canal-side house, but being out of touch with boating things - and what with Covid - we wonder how best to go about it.

Edited by Horace42
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I'm sorry to learn of your situation, but I'm sure that you and your wife will enjoy seeing more of your family.

   If you like, you can advertise your boat and your house for sale on this forum, just create a "Canalside House in Tamworth For Sale" and a "45 foot Gloomcraft [or whatever] For Sale" topic, and give some details and, if possible, show photographs of the house and the boat. If you decide to place your boat with a broker, I can recommend ABNB - they will sell boats off their home moorings (they sold our last one while she was moored at Springwood Haven near Nuneaton) so you wouldn't need to take the boat to their premises.

Edited by Athy
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3 minutes ago, Athy said:

 If you decide to place your boat with a broker, I can recommend ABNB - they will sell boats off their home moorings (they sold our last one while she was moored at Springwood Haven near Nuneaton) so you wouldn't need to take the boat to their premises.

However, given your mobility and care issues, it is far better to get the boat to a broker so they can handle viewings. If you need someone to do it but finance is an issue, ask the broker to take their fee off the final settlement.

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4 minutes ago, Athy said:

I'm sorry to learn of your situation, but I'm sure that you and your wife will enjoy seeing more of your family.

   If you like, you can dvertise your boat and your house for sale on this forum, just create a "Canalside House For Sale" and a "45 foot Gloomcraft [or whatever] For Sale" topic, and give some details and, if possible, show photographs of the house and the boat. If you decide to place your boat with a broker, I can recommend ABNB - they will sell boats off their home moorings (they sold our last one while she was moored at Springwood Haven near Nuneaton) so you wouldn't need to take the boat to their premises.

Sorry to hear about your situation. Why not put the house and boat on hear for sales. I’m sure with the amount of people networking on here it would create a lot of interest. Save a load of commissions,brokers,estate agents. Good luck for the future.

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2 minutes ago, matty40s said:

However, given your mobility and care issues, it is far better to get the boat to a broker so they can handle viewings. If you need someone to do it but finance is an issue, ask the broker to take their fee off the final settlement.

I appreciate your concern - but a broker will accompany viewers and show them round (at least, ABNB did with ours) so no problem.

ABNB sold her to the first viewer, incidentally.

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You have my sympathies. I live in the hope that I will be able to back out of boat owning in a pre-planned way.  You have not had that fortune.

 

For a house, I would suggest an estate agent in the usual way, but ensure that they are aware that an EOG mooring will add value and saleability.  Then, if they do not already know,  tell them about the various forums they can put details on.  Including this one.

 

For a boat, use a broker.  Various posts on here with good and bad.  Worth using one who can handle all the viewings, either on  your mooring or at theirs

  A good one will, for a fee, arrange a boat move to their base.

 

N

 

 

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Thanks for all the replies and good wishes. House sale is under way. It is boat disposal that is the problem.

I will try an ad here to see what happens.  Any tips on DIY sales  - what to beware of - scams - re financing, warranties, etc.

 

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18 minutes ago, Horace42 said:

Thanks for all the replies and good wishes. House sale is under way. It is boat disposal that is the problem.

I will try an ad here to see what happens.  Any tips on DIY sales  - what to beware of - scams - re financing, warranties, etc.

 

 

The only real thing to be aware of re finance is make sure you have the money in your account before letting the boat go. No ifs no buts, no 'can I take it with a deposit'.

 

Make the boats as presentable as you can. We spent a few hundred quid getting some bits done to ours. @matty40s did a great job tydying up some scrapes for us in the cabin/hull sides and the bow flashes the well deck floor and painting the gas locker. It was money well spent.

 

If you can do it youself even better/cheaper.

 

 

Edited by The Happy Nomad
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2 minutes ago, The Happy Nomad said:

 

The only real thing to be aware of re finance is make sure you have the money in your account before letting the boat go. No ifs no buts, no 'can I take it with a deposit'.

 

Make the boats as presentable as you can. We spent a few hundred quid getting some bits done to ours. @matty40s did a great job tydying up some scrapes for us in the cabin/hull sides and the bow flashes and painting the gas locker. It was money well spent.

 

If you can do it yourself even better.

Thanks.  Yes I agree. My boat is 'tired' and needs a it of TLC to make it presentable.

Mechanically everything is in good working order and the engine bursts into life first time at the touch of the button.

My concern is I have modernised it myself over the years with non-propriety products (diy things) and although with drawings and instructions, I suspect the new owner would not have a clue how to fix things if they went wrong.... and I certainly don't want to be pestered with emergency calls if it breaks down after I have sold it....

...are these the sort of things sold as 'projects' .... and how is this factored into the sales price...coupled the fact it has extensive rust - as expected being 40 years old...but the hull is absolutely watertight with a perfectly dry bilge ...

 

I will work an an ad to post here asap..

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Do note that water frontage and an EoG will likely add much more to the house value than the estate thinks, they do not always handle water frontage well. Hold out for top price and even if a later mortgage valuation comes in a bit low stand your ground.

 

When I sold a house with mooring on a tidal estuary one of the valuations said "there is a load of mud at the bottom of the garden but I don't think it will detract too much from the value of the property".

 

Both boats and houses are selling very well just now.

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2 hours ago, Horace42 said:

My concern is I have modernised it myself over the years with non-propriety products (diy things) and although with drawings and instructions, I suspect the new owner would not have a clue how to fix things if they went wrong.... and I certainly don't want to be pestered with emergency calls if it breaks down after I have sold it....

 

This is one of the advantages of using a broker, and letting them take it away to their marina and take their cut for handle all the sales. Any owner who experiences any issues after buying it won't have your contact details.

 

If you have a few drawings and instructions regarding the modifications you've made to your boat that's a lot more help than most buyers will get anyway!

 

In addition to other suggestions, there's a brokerage based at Alvecote Marina near you (no particular recommendation although I did look at a couple of boats there)

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I'm not sure if these thoughts are helpful, but I am currently undertaking a private purchase of a boat, so coming at this from the other side if you decide to go that way.

 

People need to contact you to make enquiries or arrange a viewing. That means phone, text or email. All of these can be created cheaply on a disposable basis - a cheap pay as you go phone and then don't use it any more; a temporary email address created in minutes. The odds of them banging on the door are negligible, and you are moving anyway!

 

Documents give confidence. Ideally a purchase receipt (appreciating it may have vanished years ago in your case) in which case evidence of longstanding ownership such as datable photographs, paperwork from BW/CRT; evidence of the current licence and BSS, ie how long does it have to run; the most recent hull survey if you have had one.

 

If it looks clean and tidy, it indicates that it has probably been loved and cared for. Slightly faded and aged is a reflection of reality - a new owner may prefer to put their own stamp on the decor and if the price is a bit lower because it is a bit faded, it is easier to justify buying that boat. With the age of it, you are not trying to appeal to the buyer of a brand new shiny boat so a bit of fixing up is to be expected - it doesn't sound like it has deteriorated to the status of 'project' for which read needs totally gutting and re-fitting so I wouldn't describe it as that, just needing some TLC.

 

Taking photos after any cleaning/tidying/dusting gives a better impression! (you would be amazed how many take the photos first). There is no point hiding anything but equally it's worth taking photos of everything - bathroom, galley, bedroom(s) engine bay/room and a full length shot to give a general impression. As well as the photos, a layout plan really helps visualise what you are looking at, even if only hand sketched to approximate scale with dimensions.

 

A description with as many of the fittings listed as possible, ideally with approximate dates, is very useful. E.g. 12V Electrolux washing machine c.2020; central heating from a Webasto diesel heater installed 2015 etc. Also, any equipment which comes with the boat 'boat will come complete with all crockery, cutlery, pots and pans, mooring ropes, 3 windlasses' etc. This clarifies what you are actually getting which saves forgetting to ask and then turning up to your new boat to find you needed to bring mooring ropes and a windlass!

 

Apolloduck is a good place to gauge current prices - they may surprise you. Consider whether you want as much as possible or are pricing to sell quickly, and whether you are fixed and firm or are prepared to negotiate. If your pricing is fair, you can quite reasonably do the former but make that clear in your advert (I am buying at a fixed price, which was clear from the start which saves any false expectations/wasted journeys).

 

There is surprisingly little paperwork required, technically none. However a Bill of Sale can be useful for both parties, alongside a receipt for the money. You can find a template for a Bill of Sale freely available on a web search.

 

That's all I can think of!

 

Alec

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Clean it, tidy it, put it with a broker. By far the least stressful way if doing it. Remember boats are sold as seen so if the future owner can't make it work if you have sold via a broker the buck stops there and you won't be bothered by it.

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25 minutes ago, Loddon said:

Clean it, tidy it, put it with a broker. By far the least stressful way if doing it. Remember boats are sold as seen so if the future owner can't make it work if you have sold via a broker the buck stops there and you won't be bothered by it.

 

Mmm.

 

The broker is merely someone who 'facilitates' the sale.

 

A buyer will have no comeback to the broker unless the broker actually owns the boat as allegedly happens with a certain well known broker somewhere near Whilton locks.

 

It still needs to be described honestly because the broker has the comeback of stating the details were provided by the seller not them. The seller should verify the details, I did and found a couple of errors that Rugby Boats initially were going to post on their web site.

 

So if you say your boat has an Isuzu 42 in pristine condition but in fact its got a delapitated worn out BMC that smokes like the proverbial worn out pile of scrap then the ultimate comeback is to the seller not the broker.

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46 minutes ago, agg221 said:

I'm not sure if these thoughts are helpful, but I am currently undertaking a private purchase of a boat, so coming at this from the other side if you decide to go that way.

 

People need to contact you to make enquiries or arrange a viewing. That means phone, text or email. All of these can be created cheaply on a disposable basis - a cheap pay as you go phone and then don't use it any more; a temporary email address created in minutes. The odds of them banging on the door are negligible, and you are moving anyway!

 

Documents give confidence. Ideally a purchase receipt (appreciating it may have vanished years ago in your case) in which case evidence of longstanding ownership such as datable photographs, paperwork from BW/CRT; evidence of the current licence and BSS, ie how long does it have to run; the most recent hull survey if you have had one.

 

If it looks clean and tidy, it indicates that it has probably been loved and cared for. Slightly faded and aged is a reflection of reality - a new owner may prefer to put their own stamp on the decor and if the price is a bit lower because it is a bit faded, it is easier to justify buying that boat. With the age of it, you are not trying to appeal to the buyer of a brand new shiny boat so a bit of fixing up is to be expected - it doesn't sound like it has deteriorated to the status of 'project' for which read needs totally gutting and re-fitting so I wouldn't describe it as that, just needing some TLC.

 

Taking photos after any cleaning/tidying/dusting gives a better impression! (you would be amazed how many take the photos first). There is no point hiding anything but equally it's worth taking photos of everything - bathroom, galley, bedroom(s) engine bay/room and a full length shot to give a general impression. As well as the photos, a layout plan really helps visualise what you are looking at, even if only hand sketched to approximate scale with dimensions.

 

A description with as many of the fittings listed as possible, ideally with approximate dates, is very useful. E.g. 12V Electrolux washing machine c.2020; central heating from a Webasto diesel heater installed 2015 etc. Also, any equipment which comes with the boat 'boat will come complete with all crockery, cutlery, pots and pans, mooring ropes, 3 windlasses' etc. This clarifies what you are actually getting which saves forgetting to ask and then turning up to your new boat to find you needed to bring mooring ropes and a windlass!

 

Apolloduck is a good place to gauge current prices - they may surprise you. Consider whether you want as much as possible or are pricing to sell quickly, and whether you are fixed and firm or are prepared to negotiate. If your pricing is fair, you can quite reasonably do the former but make that clear in your advert (I am buying at a fixed price, which was clear from the start which saves any false expectations/wasted journeys).

 

There is surprisingly little paperwork required, technically none. However a Bill of Sale can be useful for both parties, alongside a receipt for the money. You can find a template for a Bill of Sale freely available on a web search.

 

That's all I can think of!

 

Alec

Alec.   "...all you can think of..."   blimey that's enough to keep me out of mischief or a while.    I mentioned the 'project' aspect because I do not want any after-sales obligations or hassle and preferably nothing more than superficial cleaning, before I sell it, much  along the lines you suggested.

The sales price will reflect this.

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19 minutes ago, The Happy Nomad said:

 

Mmm.

 

The broker is merely someone who 'facilitates' the sale.

 

A buyer will have no comeback to the broker unless the broker actually owns the boat as allegedly happens with a certain well known broker somewhere near Whilton locks.

 

It still needs to be described honestly because the broker has the comeback of stating the details were provided by the seller not them. The seller should verify the details, I did and found a couple of errors that Rugby Boats initially were going to post on their web site.

 

So if you say your boat has an Isuzu 42 in pristine condition but in fact its got a delapitated worn out BMC that smokes like the proverbial worn out pile of scrap then the ultimate comeback is to the seller not the broker.

That's true but I wasn't saying anything about misdescription.

The broker acts as a buffer, or has done in the sales I have made, so you have no need to deal with the great unwashed. 

 

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17 minutes ago, Horace42 said:

Alec.   "...all you can think of..."   blimey that's enough to keep me out of mischief or a while.    I mentioned the 'project' aspect because I do not want any after-sales obligations or hassle and preferably nothing more than superficial cleaning, before I sell it, much  along the lines you suggested.

The sales price will reflect this.

When viewing adverts, I would expect to see what you have described as something like 'older boat in need of TLC'. That doesn't generate any after-sales obligations if accompanied with 'sold as seen'. 'Project' seems to have become a euphemism for a wreck in need of a total refit. There aren't many 'projects' that show up over £30k.


Alec

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22 hours ago, Horace42 said:

Regretfully due to age related physical impairment we have not been able to safely use our narrowboat for the last 3 years - it is just sat at the end of the garden collecting leaves - and spiders - and insurance - and CRT bills...

 

Coupled to which our children have been asking us to move somewhere nearer to them so they can call in quickly if we need help.

 

And last year we did need help. My wife was struck down by a stroke and I became her full time carer - leaving no time for chat rooms (if anybody has noticed my absence).

 

I am saying this, not to seek sympathy, but as a matter of fact, so that my problems of boat disposal can be understood and answered.

 

We are selling up our canal-side house, but being out of touch with boating things - and what with Covid - we wonder how best to go about it.

 

You have a canal boat brokerage very near you

 

Boats for Sale (nortoncanesboatbuilders.co.uk)

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11 minutes ago, The Happy Nomad said:

 

Mmm.

 

The broker is merely someone who 'facilitates' the sale.

 

A buyer will have no comeback to the broker unless the broker actually owns the boat as allegedly happens with a certain well known broker somewhere near Whilton locks.

 

It still needs to be described honestly because the broker has the comeback of stating the details were provided by the seller not them. The seller should verify the details, I did and found a couple of errors that Rugby Boats initially were going to post on their web site.

 

So if you say your boat has an Isuzu 42 in pristine condition but in fact its got a delapitated worn out BMC that smokes like the proverbial worn out pile of scrap then the ultimate comeback is to the seller not the broker.

My boat sale might be unique - I do not want to hold out for the highest price by over-stressing or exaggerating the features. Painting a glowing picture might increase the value but also disproportionately increase the expectations  - and bring in it's wake a whole load of hassle if things went wrong.

Painting the boat would be better - but I do not have time for that.

A quick sale price is probably the best bet for me, but yes, a good clean makes sense...

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4 hours ago, Horace42 said:

Thanks.  Yes I agree. My boat is 'tired' and needs a it of TLC to make it presentable.

Mechanically everything is in good working order and the engine bursts into life first time at the touch of the button.

My concern is I have modernised it myself over the years with non-propriety products (diy things) and although with drawings and instructions, I suspect the new owner would not have a clue how to fix things if they went wrong.... and I certainly don't want to be pestered with emergency calls if it breaks down after I have sold it....

...are these the sort of things sold as 'projects' .... and how is this factored into the sales price...coupled the fact it has extensive rust - as expected being 40 years old...but the hull is absolutely watertight with a perfectly dry bilge ...

 

I will work an an ad to post here asap..

 

 

A floating boat with a working engine?  Needs TLC?  Don't want any comeback from the buyer?

 

I'll give you ten grand for it, as is, where is, unseen - and you'll never hear from me again ...

 

... and you don't need to bother cleaning it.

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For clarity, my previous post is the sort of offer you are likely to get if you advertise it as you have described above.

 

When you are privately selling boats, expect a flurry of calls offering you between a quarter and a half of the asking price from many different people.

 

Accept the brokers take a commission (5% ish, depends on the broker) and as advised, pay someone to spruce it up first for best price - even slip it and black it so it doesn't look as rusty, then get a broker to take it away.  The only other contact you will get after that is offers to accept or refuse, and eventually the bill of sale to sign.

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