Jump to content

Waste Water Pipe


scb61

Featured Posts

Hello again - I am back for more advice if you don't mind?

 

I am approaching the part of my NB refurbishment where the bathroom and kitchen are ready to be installed - In respect of the waste water plumbing I had planned on using PVC pipe connected with solve weld, a bit of research here and elsewhere would suggest this is not the way forward and 'clear pvc hose with a polyester yarn' is the correct way forward. Is this because of the flexibility of the pipe?

 

Can anyone advise as to what the ID or OD of the pvc pipe should be? Also are special fittings required to connect this to standard sink/shower wastes?

 

Finally (for now) I have existing holes for the outlets but not all of these are 10 inches above the water line, reading here and elsewhere this is not an issue in respect of the BSC as consideration is given to the height of the sinks from the waterline and the use of NRV's  - can anyone confirm that this would be acceptable for insurance purposes? I would hope that if a boat was BSC compliant that would suffice.

 

The shower waste will be pumped with a whale gulp pump  220 12V as it seems to be suitable but of course the spec doesn't give any info on inlet/outlet pipe diameter -if anyone has any reason why I should choose an alternative please speak up!

 

Many thanks again for any and all advice received

 

Steve

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Whale gulpers use 19mm (3/4") hose. I would use this type of hose, rather than the clear with reinforcement yarn as that tends to go hard and brittle over time. In addition, the hose I've linked to won't collapse under vacuum on the low pressure side. Available in a number of diameters. The larger ones will work for sink drains too. Attach to a 1/2" BSP skin fitting with 3/4" hose tail like this.

For sink drains I have successfully used PVC standard waste fittings. Screw together, rather than solvent weld. These can have BSP threads that will fit on to skin fittings with BSP threads successfully. Other people use flexible hose to skin fittings with appropriate sized hose tails with success. Many don't fit U bends, or bottle traps on sinks, but I do to dissuade things from crawling in from the outside. If they do manage it they need to be very good at holding their breath! 

Jen

Edited by Jen-in-Wellies
Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, scb61 said:

 

 

Finally (for now) I have existing holes for the outlets but not all of these are 10 inches above the water line, reading here and elsewhere this is not an issue in respect of the BSC as consideration is given to the height of the sinks from the waterline and the use of NRV's  - can anyone confirm that this would be acceptable for insurance purposes? I would hope that if a boat was BSC compliant that would suffice.

 

Is this a private boat or to be a hire boat. Its not a BSS pass/fail on a private boat

Link to comment
Share on other sites

NRVs are a pain, always block. Avoid them.

I have fitted many boats with solvent weld pipes and had no problems. They will not come apart like screw up and push fit and have always passed BSC.

I use traps, its easier to fit the waste fittings to pipes. Shower waste needs to be a 3/4 outlet fitting, no trap,. but the pipe from the tray to the pump needs to hold more water than the pipe from the pump to the skin fitting to avoid flow back into the tray after the pump stops.

  • Greenie 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

14 minutes ago, Tracy D'arth said:

 but the pipe from the tray to the pump needs to hold more water than the pipe from the pump to the skin fitting to avoid flow back into the tray after the pump stops.

A lot of people don't know that

  • Greenie 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 hours ago, ditchcrawler said:

A lot of people don't know that

I didn't ... and I now know why that happens in my shower. Thanks, you lot are soooo helpful. ?

  • Greenie 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Personally I wouldn't use clear PVC hise for anything larger than 3/4" and bear in mind that those narrow diameter waste hoses tend to get blocked up if gravity drained.

 

For anything larger use something like Kanaflex hose which is better quality than ordinary PVC.

Edited by blackrose
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, scb61 said:

 

Finally (for now) I have existing holes for the outlets but not all of these are 10 inches above the water line, reading here and elsewhere this is not an issue in respect of the BSC as consideration is given to the height of the sinks from the waterline and the use of NRV's  - can anyone confirm that this would be acceptable for insurance purposes? I would hope that if a boat was BSC compliant that would suffice.

 

 

It's not a question of the BSC it's just bad practice to drill holes in your hull less than 10" above the waterline unless you're intending to go much lower and install a seacock. 

 

Remember first and foremost it's a boat. Fit your interior installations around the boat, not the other way around. Think things through properly and don't compromise the integrity of the boat in orderto fit something that would be better somewhere else or not on the boat at all.

Edited by blackrose
  • Greenie 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

13 hours ago, ditchcrawler said:

Is this a private boat or to be a hire boat. Its not a BSS pass/fail on a private boat

It is a private boat being refurbished

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, blackrose said:

 

It's not a question of the BSC it's just bad practice to drill holes in your hull less than 10" above the waterline unless you're intending to go much lower and install a seacock. 

 

Remember first and foremost it's a boat. Fit your interior installations around the boat, not the other way around. Think things through properly and don't compromise the integrity of the boat in orderto fit something that would be better somewhere else or not on the boat at all.

Thank you for the response - we are not trying to do anything out of the ordinary, just fit a standard kitchen and a standard bathroom - 3 waste outlets, the shower is pumped so we can easily achieve the 10 inch guideline, but the 2 sinks??? A standard kitchen carcass and top gives a height from the floor of 3ft and with a sink (the shallowest we can find) and a waste pipe fitted straight out to the hull it is impossible to achieve a 10inch clearance. The bathroom vanity unit is the same, so I can't help but wonder who writes the regulations and have they thought through the practicalities of them.

We either fit the sinks at chest height or have all the waste pumped or ignore the guidelines.

 

Research suggests that it is the top of the sink that can be used as the 10inch upper level but I don't see this in the regulations - it all seems a little ambiguous with no definitive or workable guideline, complying with BSC is one thing but we would like to meet any insurance requirements as well - something will have to give and I imagine it will just be apply common sense and do it as best as you can to meet the regs

 

As for gas copper pipe bore size - oh dear oh dear - is it just on boats??

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

47 minutes ago, scb61 said:

 

Research suggests that it is the top of the sink that can be used as the 10inch upper level but I don't see this in the regulations - it all seems a little ambiguous with no definitive or workable guideline, complying with BSC is one thing but we would like to meet any insurance requirements as well - something will have to give and I imagine it will just be apply common sense and do it as best as you can to meet the regs

 

The BSS rules in relation to the height of hull openings appear in Part 10 of the requirements relating to non-private boats. This states:

"To reduce the risk of your boat sinking if it keels over or is excessively weighed down, it's a good idea for privately owned boats to only have openings which are at a height of at least 250mm (10ins) above the waterline. Where openings are necessary below this level this risk can be reduced by ensuring that these openings are permanently and securely connected to ducts or pipes, which are watertight up to that level."

Your sink waste pipe and the sink itself constitute "ducts or pipes", providing that the connections are secure. In the case of flexible plastic piping it is generally recommended that you should use stainless steel hose clips, with two per connection.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

2 hours ago, scb61 said:

Thank you for the response - we are not trying to do anything out of the ordinary, just fit a standard kitchen and a standard bathroom - 3 waste outlets, the shower is pumped so we can easily achieve the 10 inch guideline, but the 2 sinks??? A standard kitchen carcass and top gives a height from the floor of 3ft and with a sink (the shallowest we can find) and a waste pipe fitted straight out to the hull it is impossible to achieve a 10inch clearance. The bathroom vanity unit is the same, so I can't help but wonder who writes the regulations and have they thought through the practicalities of them.

We either fit the sinks at chest height or have all the waste pumped or ignore the guidelines.

 

Research suggests that it is the top of the sink that can be used as the 10inch upper level but I don't see this in the regulations - it all seems a little ambiguous with no definitive or workable guideline, complying with BSC is one thing but we would like to meet any insurance requirements as well - something will have to give and I imagine it will just be apply common sense and do it as best as you can to meet the regs

 

As for gas copper pipe bore size - oh dear oh dear - is it just on boats??

 

I did them without traps and that saves about 5 inches. For what its worth  I discovered last week that the waste I our house runs uphill from the trap to the hole through the wall.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

1 hour ago, ditchcrawler said:

I did them without traps and that saves about 5 inches. For what its worth  I discovered last week that the waste I our house runs uphill from the trap to the hole through the wall.

One problem with having no trap, is that on windy days you get a cold draught blowing into the boat through the pipe.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, Keeping Up said:

One problem with having no trap, is that on windy days you get a cold draught blowing into the boat through the pipe.

Is that high or low level ventilation for BSS purposes?

  • Greenie 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

19 minutes ago, Keeping Up said:

One problem with having no trap, is that on windy days you get a cold draught blowing into the boat through the pipe.

 

Put the plug in!

Just now, David Mack said:

Is that high or low level ventilation for BSS purposes?

 

High for the stove, low for the hob ...

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, ditchcrawler said:

I did them without traps and that saves about 5 inches. For what its worth  I discovered last week that the waste I our house runs uphill from the trap to the hole through the wall.

 

Yes it's all about jiggling around with plumbing fittings and bits of hose and getting rid of the fittings you don't need. Lots of us have managed to fit sinks in our boats while achieving the 10" minimum skin fitting height - without installing chest level sinks!

  • Greenie 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...
On 09/03/2021 at 18:35, Tracy D'arth said:

NRVs are a pain, always block. Avoid them.

I have fitted many boats with solvent weld pipes and had no problems. They will not come apart like screw up and push fit and have always passed BSC.

I use traps, its easier to fit the waste fittings to pipes. Shower waste needs to be a 3/4 outlet fitting, no trap,. but the pipe from the tray to the pump needs to hold more water than the pipe from the pump to the skin fitting to avoid flow back into the tray after the pump stops.

Hi, two years in to a frequently non functioning shower waste, I have found a new problem, a dead mouse in shower outlet , sigh.

However, I spent this afternoon messing about, the waste pump is excellent at removing  water, the shower drains in to a sort of home made sump which has a lift pipe which is blocked, there may be a non return valve on the outlet side, I am past caring.

I can't get the sump out, can't clean the pipe, so I will bypass the existing arrangement and have a hose from pump to sump directly, where does one buy this hose, its the clear stuff with braid inside..

Tx, 

Edited by LadyG
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Replace the sump box, float switch and existing pump with a Whale Gulper fitted direcy to the shower outlet pipe.

 

You will then enjoy years of trouble free showers.

  • Greenie 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

12 minutes ago, cuthound said:

Replace the sump box, float switch and existing pump with a Whale Gulper fitted direcy to the shower outlet pipe.

 

You will then enjoy years of trouble free showers.

I would need to rip everything out, as in re build the bathroom, and start from scratch, costing about £2000 , it's not worth the effort, never mind the cash.,  There is  nothing wrong with the pump, its a Jabsco diaphram, probably had very litle use due to design of the system. No float switch, its manual ON' when one is showering. "OFF" when the shower tray has drained.

The outlet from the shower is inacessible, the sump is non removeable, I can't get purchase on the sump fittings. 

I've cleaned al the pipe and hose I can access, there was a lot of stuff, but the pipe from the sump is not accessible, and seems to be blocked,

 

I just need 12 nches of hose to replace the existing 6 inches. :)

I will put a coarse filter on the end of it, as my kitty keeps his litter tray in the area, and some ends up in the shower.

Edited by LadyG
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.