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Ryeland

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About Ryeland

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location
    Gloucestershire

Previous Fields

  • Occupation
    Retired
  • Boat Name
    Ryeland
  • Boat Location
    CC

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  1. Yes, it was a dog walker who mentioned to me that he hadn't seen anyone on the boat for about 6 weeks, and about the smell. I hadn't noticed anything when I was there last week. Richard
  2. Reported this today due to the smell coming from the boat, the information above explains it. Very sad. Richard
  3. Hole in each end, one end on the battery terminal bolt, the other on the shunt terminal bolt. All cables to the other end of the shunt as usual. My shunt fits neatly in the 'gully' formed between the tops of two batteries. Richard
  4. My connection is a few inches of 1" x 1/8" copper strip. Probably available on Ebay or from a lightning conductor supplier. You only need something big enough to carry the current, whereas your inverter cables will probably be sized for volt drop. Richard 150mm of copper bar on ebay £4.99. Other sizes available.
  5. Depends what you are trying to do! For fitting out, I found the 5 and 30 minute polyurethane adhesives very good as you don't have to wait for hours for something like PVA to dry, and can move on to the next stage. They are also slightly gap filling. The various grab adhesives are useful for fitting panels to battens. Richard
  6. I'd second that, but be prepared to make do when mooring as few rings and of course never in the right places. Next safe place in my view is well out of the city. Richard
  7. I have the Volvo-Penta type, and the answer is yes IF you can get the propshaft back far enough. In my case it meant removing the rudder which is also possible in the water on my boat. A rag tied around the propshaft stops too much water getting in. I did however find that the propshaft was worn and needed replacement, and the cutlass type bearing as well, so it had to be done out of the water in the end, Richard
  8. And a good little supermarket in Great Haywood village as well, and another one canalside at Barlaston.
  9. Tesco near the first couple of locks north of Harecastle tunnel.
  10. On my 38 it's actually part of the wiring loom, it just sticks out of the side. Richard
  11. Much as I wouldn't normally want to disagree with Tony, from this old thread there is actually an idle speed adjustment on the fuel pump. Richard
  12. I have changed mine. Quick pull out up a slipway, remove rudder, withdraw propshaft. Used a sabre saw to cut through the glass fibre outer shell of the bearing in a couple of places and it came out easily. Tapped in the new one and reassembled. For once the job all went well, done in a couple of hours. I would think that any boatyard that can get your boat out of the water could do it. Richard
  13. It's a 4m\13ft aluminium tube with a double hook on the end. Useful further south on the Oxford, when the bridge decks are wet, and won't stay open. Also for swing bridges, and the bottom gates on the Northampton flight where there are no footplates. Richard
  14. My single handed method was to jam a pole under the handrail on one side, but it was so badly balanced that it took all my strength to lift it from the towpath side. Richard
  15. Local place in Cinderford, Gloucestershire. Richard
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