Jump to content

Best brand of coal to use in a Morso Squirrel?


Piran

Featured Posts

24 minutes ago, Higgs said:

 

Do they sit firmly, either side and against the fire bricks? They might be what I'm looking for. Was thinking of bricks, or similar. 

 

 

Yes but need trimming to fit if you have a back boiler. Useful, but expensive for what they are!

  • Greenie 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I never understand these questions. Apart from Jules Fuels boats on the lower GU I've never found a coal boat or boat yard that has more than 2 choices. Most have only 1 choice of coal. So surely you are just buying whatever your local supplier sells? ?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

31 minutes ago, bizzard said:

Years ago when most folk had the jolly old Torgem stoves in their boats, Phurnacite and Coalite and house coal were about the limit around here.  Phurnacite is very good.

Phurnacite is all I ever used, best on  the market, but not cheap.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

21 hours ago, Dave123 said:

I never understand these questions. Apart from Jules Fuels boats on the lower GU I've never found a coal boat or boat yard that has more than 2 choices. Most have only 1 choice of coal. So surely you are just buying whatever your local supplier sells? ?

Snap!

 

I have preferences, but I just buy what's available.  Saying that, Jacko used to have a choice of about 12 different fuels on Roach.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 06/11/2020 at 14:20, Tom and Bex said:

Yes but need trimming to fit if you have a back boiler. Useful, but expensive for what they are!

 

Spending north of thirty squid on two bits of cast iron, to which you have to take a hacksaw before you can use them, doesn't seem much of an investment to me.

 

I'll be using the same approach on our brand new Squirrel as we've used at home* for years -- two suitably sized and shaped bricks, or parts thereof. After all, all that is need is something to make sure the coals fall towards the grate. 

 

*but not on a Squirrel!

 

 

 

 

7 hours ago, doratheexplorer said:

I have preferences, but I just buy what's available. 

 

Exactly why I use the stuff from home. I buy it in bulk and it's there in the coal bunker. I just lug a sack or two to the boat when necessary.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 09/11/2020 at 22:29, Dr Bob said:

Another vote for excel and the coal inserts. I only empty the ash once per 24 hours.

I gave the chimney three sweeps last year prior to using it, replaced the glass and rope, and the fire bricks, when i lit it again last November, it was like a blast furnace, had to put reflective insulation around above the fire boards, I then used extra old fire bricks to reduce the capacity , as it was that hot. 
I thought the coal I had last year was excellent, burning through the night, and ash to be emptied every five or six days, however, this year, fire not burning quite so hot, but completely different coal, still no ash , and fire stays in all night, empty at a push four days.

I think giving the fire a good overhaul has worked wonders, rather than the coal.  Might be a co incidence I suppose but this is fifth year of my use and has been remarkable against first three years, with then needing to empty every morning.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 hours ago, Timx said:

I gave the chimney three sweeps last year prior to using it, replaced the glass and rope, and the fire bricks, when i lit it again last November, it was like a blast furnace, had to put reflective insulation around above the fire boards, I then used extra old fire bricks to reduce the capacity , as it was that hot. 
I thought the coal I had last year was excellent, burning through the night, and ash to be emptied every five or six days, however, this year, fire not burning quite so hot, but completely different coal, still no ash , and fire stays in all night, empty at a push four days.

I think giving the fire a good overhaul has worked wonders, rather than the coal.  Might be a co incidence I suppose but this is fifth year of my use and has been remarkable against first three years, with then needing to empty every morning.

I think you must have used rather large fire bricks to reduce capacity.

Most peeps seem to think they use 2-3 bags of coal a week when used 24/7 and at that rate you will fill the ash tray in 1-2 days dependant on fuel. 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

48 minutes ago, Dr Bob said:

I think you must have used rather large fire bricks to reduce capacity.

Most peeps seem to think they use 2-3 bags of coal a week when used 24/7 and at that rate you will fill the ash tray in 1-2 days dependant on fuel. 

I think if its burning fiercely most of the ash is going up the chimney! Burley fireball stoves are the same very little ash as it's gone skyward 

  • Greenie 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

7 minutes ago, peterboat said:

I think if its burning fiercely most of the ash is going up the chimney! Burley fireball stoves are the same very little ash as it's gone skyward 

I've wondered about this, there is a definite difference between amount of ash and how fierce the fire is, I've always thought it was just hot enough to burn more completely but maybe the draw sends more ash up the flu

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Just now, tree monkey said:

I've wondered about this, there is a definite difference between amount of ash and how fierce the fire is, I've always thought it was just hot enough to burn more completely but maybe the draw sends more ash up the flu

I think so especially on wood,  but even on the Rayburn when on cooking temps their is less ash so my assumption are its going up the chimney.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

55 minutes ago, peterboat said:

I think if its burning fiercely most of the ash is going up the chimney! Burley fireball stoves are the same very little ash as it's gone skyward 

I think you are prolly correct, but no one would run their fire that hot 24/7 - would they?

With a squirrel, if you put enough fire bricks down the sides then I guess you could get the centre burning hotter with a good depth of coal, but wouldn't that depth of coal then keep the ash at the bottom rather than allowing it up the flue.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

6 minutes ago, Dr Bob said:

I think you are prolly correct, but no one would run their fire that hot 24/7 - would they?

With a squirrel, if you put enough fire bricks down the sides then I guess you could get the centre burning hotter with a good depth of coal, but wouldn't that depth of coal then keep the ash at the bottom rather than allowing it up the flue.

The Rayburn when ticking over [80% of the time] has when you open the firebox just black anthracite looking up at you, when cooking its red/white hot when you open the door same with wood. Winter time it burns harder and I do have less ash but dirtier solar panels. I have a wrap around boiler in the rayburn which means that even ticking over most of the bottom heat is heating water so warm rads, however the oven will still sit at 150 degrees because flu gases heat the side and top.

fuel wise it uses 25 kilo every five days and two bags of wood at he same time [coal bags] do not expensive to run, smokeless fuel doesnt do as well and is pretty much a waste of time in it, coal chokes it up completely unless burning hard

Link to comment
Share on other sites

4 minutes ago, peterboat said:

The Rayburn when ticking over [80% of the time] has when you open the firebox just black anthracite looking up at you, when cooking its red/white hot when you open the door same with wood. Winter time it burns harder and I do have less ash but dirtier solar panels. I have a wrap around boiler in the rayburn which means that even ticking over most of the bottom heat is heating water so warm rads, however the oven will still sit at 150 degrees because flu gases heat the side and top.

fuel wise it uses 25 kilo every five days and two bags of wood at he same time [coal bags] do not expensive to run, smokeless fuel doesnt do as well and is pretty much a waste of time in it, coal chokes it up completely unless burning hard

My comments on ash levels were in response to Timx who I assumed was using a squirrel - but on re-reading his post, it doesnt actually say which stove. We've only had this squirrel this year ...the previous stove was a boatman.....and I would love to only have to do the ash every 4-5 days! From my experience in the 50's and 60's, anthracite was always the 'best' fuel in terms of use and ash.......shame these current stoves dont work as well on it (although I have not tried the squirrel on it yet!).

  • Greenie 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

27 minutes ago, Dr Bob said:

My comments on ash levels were in response to Timx who I assumed was using a squirrel - but on re-reading his post, it doesnt actually say which stove. We've only had this squirrel this year ...the previous stove was a boatman.....and I would love to only have to do the ash every 4-5 days! From my experience in the 50's and 60's, anthracite was always the 'best' fuel in terms of use and ash.......shame these current stoves dont work as well on it (although I have not tried the squirrel on it yet!).

Yes I’m using a squirrel, I used the old fire bricks again around the sides, and am using 2/3 bags a week keeping it going 24/7 but only a few coals on during the day to keep it on tick over, it was never this good a couple of years ago.

C07257B8-CA62-4980-9496-57328C8963D3.jpeg

Link to comment
Share on other sites

On 09/11/2020 at 22:29, Dr Bob said:

Another vote for excel and the coal inserts. I only empty the ash once per 24 hours.

Excel has been my preference over the last few years, but I've switched to New Heat from the same manufacturer and now prefer it. Less ash, but significantly less dust in the boat and less "fumey". Big ovals, but they are just as easy to light as Excel and, counterintuitively, just as easy to revive a sleeping fire with in the morning. I pay £10 per 20kg at the lovely Saltisford Arm. :)

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

3 hours ago, Sea Dog said:

Excel has been my preference over the last few years, but I've switched to New Heat from the same manufacturer and now prefer it. 

 

 I prefer NewHeat over Excel.  The only thing I didn't like is the sneaky stealth inflation tactic - selling in 20kg bags when the standard is 25kg.

 

I resent the old "keeping the cornflake box the same size but reducing the weight of the contents" trick.  But that's just me. 

 

Good fuel tho'

 

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue.